CFAF Research Grant

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COLLEGE FOOTBALL ASSISTANCE FUND MAKES FOOTBALL CONCUSSION RESEARCH GRANT TO CHILDRESS INSTITUTE

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – October 8, 2012 – The College Football Assistance Fund (CFAF) announced a $10,000 research grant to the Childress Institute for Pediatric Trauma to fund a college football concussion study at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

“More than 12,000 kids die every year from serious injuries, which is more than all other causes combined,” said Richard Childress, president and CEO of Richard Childress Racing and co-founder of the Childress Institute for Pediatric Trauma. “When my wife and I heard these numbers, we knew we needed to make an impact to save the lives of injured children across the United States. The Childress Institute for Pediatric Trauma is grateful to CFAF for helping us raise awareness about sports-related traumatic brain injuries.”

Wake Forest Baptist’s concussion team is working closely with Virginia Tech to study impacts in kids from six years old to college-age. This fall the group expanded their research into high schools and youth leagues, further broadening the reach, effect and relevance of the study’s eventual findings and helping ensure the safety and health of all football players nationwide.  Both institutions are currently utilizing the Head Impact Telemetry System (HITS), a system in which transponders inside players’ helmets gather and transfer data about the impact of every hit during practices and games to health care professionals on the sideline and in the clinic.

“So much is unknown about how the brain is affected from sports-related injuries,” said Dr. Joel Stitzel, Co- principal investigator at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, a part of the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences (SBES). “Through research and the support of the Childress Institute, our goal is to better identify and treat mild traumatic brain injury.”

The HITS system was purchased and installed in Wake Forest University football players’ helmets for the 2010 and 2011 seasons to study impact exposure. Further work in the joint study with Virginia Tech will improve the understanding of the biomechanical basis for brain injury as well as develop procedures for bringing future concussion research studies to football programs for younger players.

The Childress Institute for Pediatric Trauma at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center was established through the generosity of Richard and Judy Childress.

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Media Contact: Kara Thompson, kathomps@wakehealth.edu , (336) 491-9766

ABOUT CFAF

The College Football Assistance Fund is a non-profit organization dedicated to support those who have sustained serious injuries through college football. Assistance is provided to ease the burden of medical costs associated with injuries such as joint replacement, spine treatment, neurological care and other related expenses.

The CFAF was established in 2010 by a group of collegiate coaches and athletic administrators concerned about the limited resources available to injured football players. Major donors include some of today’s top college football coaches and bowls.

For more information about CFAF, please visit www.CFAFund.org


About The Childress Institute for Pediatric Trauma

The Childress Institute is working to save injured children’s lives through research, education and awareness, as well as help them recover quickly. Serious injury is the No. 1 killer of kids in America – more than 12,000 children die each year and more than 100,000 survive with some form of a disability. The Childress Institute for Pediatric Trauma at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center was established through the generosity of Richard and Judy Childress. For more information, please visit www.ChildressPediatricTrauma.org .