Health Encyclopedia > Health Topics

Drug Allergies

Topic Overview

What is a drug allergy?

A drug allergy happens when you have a harmful reaction to a medicine you use. Your body's immune system fights back by setting off an allergic reaction. Most drug allergies are mild, and the symptoms go away within a few days after you stop using the medicine. But some drug allergies can be very serious.

Some drug allergies go away with time. But after you have an allergic reaction to a drug, you will probably always be allergic to that drug. You can also be allergic to other drugs that are like it.

A drug allergy is one type of harmful, or adverse, drug reaction. There are other kinds of adverse drug reactions. Symptoms and treatments of different kinds of adverse reactions vary. So your doctor will want to find out if you have a true drug allergy or if you have another type of bad reaction that isn't as serious.

What are the symptoms?

The symptoms of a drug allergy can range from mild to very serious. Most of the time they appear within 1 to 72 hours. They include:

  • Hives or welts, a rash or blisters. These are the most common symptoms of drug allergies. See a picture of skin reactions caused by drug allergies.
  • Coughing, wheezing, a runny nose, and trouble breathing.
  • A fever.
  • Serious skin conditions that makes your skin blister and peel. These include toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome.
  • Anaphylaxis , which is the most dangerous reaction. It can be deadly, and you will need emergency treatment. Symptoms, such as hives and trouble breathing, usually appear within 1 hour after you take the medicine. Without emergency care, you could die.

What medicines commonly cause an allergic reaction?

Any medicine can cause an allergic reaction. A few of the most common ones are:

  • Penicillins (such as ampicillin or amoxicillin).
  • Sulfa medicines.
  • Barbiturates.
  • Insulin .
  • Vaccines.
  • Anticonvulsants.
  • Medicines for hyperthyroidism.

If you are allergic to one medicine, you may be allergic to others like it. For example, if you are allergic to penicillin, there is a chance that you may also be allergic to similar medicines, such as amoxicillin.

How is a drug allergy diagnosed?

Your doctor will diagnose a drug allergy by asking you questions about the medicines you take and about any medicines you have taken in the recent past. Your doctor will also ask about your past health and your symptoms. He or she will do a physical exam.

If this doesn't tell your doctor whether you have a drug allergy, then he or she may do skin tests. Or your doctor may have you take small doses of a medicine to see if you have a reaction.

How is it treated?

If you have a reaction

Call 911 right away if you have trouble breathing or if you start to get hives.

If you have a severe reaction, your first treatment may occur in an emergency room. You may get an epinephrine shot to help you breathe. You may also get medicines, such as antihistamines and steroid medicines.

If you have a mild allergic reaction, over-the-counter (OTC) antihistamines may help your symptoms. You may need prescription medicine if these don't help or if you have problems with side effects, such as drowsiness. Not all OTC antihistamines cause drowsiness.

Other treatment

The best thing you can do for a drug allergy is to stop taking the medicine that causes it. Talk to your doctor to see if you can take another type of medicine.

If you can't change your medicine, your doctor may try a method called desensitization. This means that you will start to take small amounts of the medicine that caused your reaction. Under your doctor's supervision, you will then slowly increase how much you take. This lets your immune system "get used to" the medicine. After this, you may no longer have an allergic reaction.

Staying safe

If you have severe drug allergies, your doctor may give you an allergy kit that contains an epinephrine shot. Your kit may also include an antihistamine. Keep your allergy kit with you at all times. Your doctor will teach you how to use it. If you have a serious allergic reaction, you may need to give yourself the shot, take the antihistamine, and get emergency medical treatment.

Be sure to wear a medical alert bracelet or other jewelry that lists your drug allergies. If you are in an emergency, this can save your life.

How can you care of yourself at home?

To take care of yourself at home:

  • Know which medicines you're allergic to, and avoid taking these medicines.
  • Keep a list of all medicines you are taking.
  • Talk with your doctor or pharmacist about any new medicines you are prescribed. Make sure they are not similar to those that can cause a reaction.
  • Don't use someone else's medicines or share yours.

If you do have a mild reaction, take steps to relieve symptoms such as itching. Take cool showers, or apply cool compresses. Wear light clothing that doesn't bother your skin. Stay away from strong soaps and detergents, which can make itching worse.

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  Allergies in Children: Giving an Epinephrine Shot to a Child
  Allergies: Giving Yourself an Epinephrine Shot

Other Places To Get Help

Organizations

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology
555 East Wells Street
Suite 1100
Milwaukee, WI  53202-3823
Phone: (414) 272-6071
Email: info@aaaai.org
Web Address: www.aaaai.org
 

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology publishes an excellent series of pamphlets on allergies, asthma, and related information. It also provides physician referrals.



American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI)
85 West Algonquin Road
Suite 550
Arlington Heights, IL  60005
Phone: 1-800-842-7777 (allergist referral service)
Email: mail@acaai.org
Web Address: www.acaai.org
 

The American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI) provides allergy information for consumers, including a nationwide allergist referral service.



References

Other Works Consulted

  • Dykewicz MS (2009). Drug allergies. In EG Nabel, ed., ACP Medicine, section 6, chap. 14. Hamilton, ON: BC Decker.
  • McNeil D (2011). Allergic reactions to drugs. In ET Bope et al., eds., Conn's Current Therapy 2011, pp. 796–798. Philadelphia: Saunders.
  • Grammer LC (2012). Drug allergy. In L Goldman, A Shafer, eds., Goldman's Cecil Medicine, 24th ed., pp. 1638–1640. Philadelphia: Saunders.
  • Archer GL, Polk RE (2012). Approach to therapy for bacterial diseases. In DL Longo et al., eds., Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 18th ed., vol. 1, pp. 1133–1150. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • Celik G, et al. (2009). Drug allergy. In NF Adkinson Jr et al., eds. Middleton's Allergy Principles and Practice, 7th ed., vol. 1, pp. 1205–1226. Philadelphia: Mosby Elsevier.
  • Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters (2010). Drug allergy: An updated practice parameter. Annals of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, 105: e1–e78.
  • Shinkai K, et al. (2012). Cutaneous drug reactions. In DL Longo et al., eds., Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 18th ed., vol. 1, pp. 432–440. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Credits

By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Rohit K Katial, MD - Allergy and Immunology
Last Revised June 17, 2013

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