Health Encyclopedia > Health Topics

Carney Complex

National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

Important

It is possible that the main title of the report Carney Complex is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

Synonyms

  • CNC
  • Carney syndrome
  • familial myxoma
  • lentigines, atrial myxoma, and blue nevi (LAMB) syndrome
  • nevi, atrial myxoma, myxoid neurofibromas, and ephelides (NAME) syndrome

Disorder Subdivisions

  • None

General Discussion

Carney complex is a rare genetic disorder characterized by multiple benign tumors (multiple neoplasia) most often affecting the heart, skin and endocrine system and abnormalities in skin coloring (pigment) resulting in a spotty appearance to the skin of affected areas. Benign tumors of connective tissue (myxomas) are common in individuals with Carney complex and, most often, are found in the heart where they can potentially cause serious, life-threatening complications including stroke, valvular obstruction or heart failure. A wide variety of endocrine abnormalities potentially can occur in Carney complex affecting a variety of glands. Additional tumors include myxomas affecting the skin and nerve sheath tumors (schwannomas). Skin pigment abnormalities include tiny flat (freckle-like) black or brown spots (multiple lentigines) and small, blue or bluish-black spots (blue nevi). The specific symptoms and severity of Carney complex can vary greatly from one person to another. In many cases, Carney complex is due to mutations of the PRKAR1A gene. The mutation can occur randomly for no apparent reason (i.e., new mutation) or be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.



Carney complex is a different disorder from Carney triad. Carney triad encompasses three types of tumors: a gastric stromal sarcoma; functioning extra-adrenal paragangliomas; and pulmonary chondromas. Although these two disorders are completely unrelated, both have sometimes been referred to as Carney syndrome, causing confusion. This report deals solely with Carney complex.

Resources

Pituitary Network Association

P.O. Box 1958

Thousand Oaks, CA 91358

USA

Tel: (805)499-9973

Fax: (805)480-0633

Email: info@pituitary.org

Internet: http://www.pituitary.org



American Heart Association

7272 Greenville Avenue

Dallas, TX 75231

Tel: (214)784-7212

Fax: (214)784-1307

Tel: (800)242-8721

Email: Review.personal.info@heart.org

Internet: http://www.heart.org



Cushing's Support and Research Foundation, Inc.

65 East India Row

#22B

Boston, MA 02110

Tel: (617)723-3674

Fax: (617)723-3674

Email: cushpace@gmail.com

Internet: http://www.csrf.net



American Cancer Society, Inc.

250 Williams NW St

Ste 6000

Atlanta, GA 30303

USA

Tel: (404)320-3333

Tel: (800)227-2345

TDD: (866)228-4327

Internet: http://www.cancer.org



National Cancer Institute

6116 Executive Blvd Suite 300

Bethesda, MD 20892-8322

USA

Tel: (301)435-3848

Tel: (800)422-6237

TDD: (800)332-8615

Email: cancergovstaff@mail.nih.gov

Internet: http://www.cancer.gov



Hormone Health Network

8401 Connecticut Avenue

Suite 900

Chevy Chase, MD 20815-5817

Fax: (310)941-0259

Tel: (800)467-6663

Email: hormone@endo-society.org

Internet: http://www.hormone.org/



For a Complete Report

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

Last Updated:  5/3/2011

Copyright  2011 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise, Incorporated disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. Your use of this information means that you agree to the Terms of Use. How this information was developed to help you make better health decisions.

Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated.

USNWR 2013-2014Magnet Hospital RecognitionConsumer Choice2014 Best DoctorsJoint Commission Report

Disclaimer: The information on this website is for general informational purposes only and SHOULD NOT be relied upon as a substitute for sound professional medical advice, evaluation or care from your physician or other qualified health care provider.