Fertility Drugs

Many medications are available for the treatment of infertility and each of the major product categories are discussed on our Web site.

Several fertility drugs indirectly induce ovulation and include Clomid, Femara (letrozole), Glucophage (metformin), and Parlodel. Clomid and Femara induce ovulation by causing the hypothalamus to increase production of gonadotropin releasing hormone thus stimulating the pituitary to produce FSH.  Metformin is effective in inducing ovulation in patients with polycystic ovarian disease. It works by correcting the insulin resistance that is often present in PCOS patients.

Sometimes anovulation (lack of ovulation) is caused by a small benign tumor on the pituitary gland, which can cause hyperprolactinemia (elevated prolactin hormone levels).  Elevated prolactin levels can cause increased breast milk production and anovulation. Parlodel (bromocriptine) and Dostinex (cabergoline) corrects the elevated prolactin levels and allows ovulation to resume. Rarely, the tumor is surgically removed.

Other fertility drugs, such as FSH (Gonal-F, Follistim, Repronex, Bravelle, etc.) directly stimulate the ovaries.  FSH is normally produced by the pituitary and it stimulates the recruitment and development of follicles. These injectable fertility drugs are used in assisted reproductive technology cycles and stimulated IUI and cause the development of numerous eggs.

Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG, Profasi, Pregnyl) is given to induce ovulation (i.e. cause egg release). Ovidrel is a genetically derived pure form of hCG that is sometimes used.  The body recognizes hCG as leutinizing hormone which normally triggers ovulation.

Other medications such as antibiotics, progesterone, and corticosteroids are used to treat infections, immune disorders, and provide additional hormonal support of the pregnancy. 

 

 

 

Quick Reference

Reproductive Medicine

Patient Appointments
336-716-6476

Schedule an Appointment

Locations:

CompRehab Plaza
131 Miller Street, 2nd floor
Winston-Salem, NC 27157

Greensboro location
526 N. Elam Avenue
Suite 103
Greensboro, NC 27403

Hickory Location
Tate Medical Commons
1771 Tate Blvd SE
Hickory, NC 28602

Find a Doctor Ways to Give
Last Updated: 11-06-2013
USNWR 2013-2014Magnet Hospital RecognitionConsumer Choice2014 Best DoctorsJoint Commission Report

Disclaimer: The information on this website is for general informational purposes only and SHOULD NOT be relied upon as a substitute for sound professional medical advice, evaluation or care from your physician or other qualified health care provider.