Types of Mentoring

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One on One Mentoring

One-to-One Mentoring 

 

One mentor meets with one mentee at a time; this is the traditionally accepted model. The individualized attention that the mentor pays to the mentee allows for greater rapport building. These relationships often last a number of years but can be a lifelong partnership. These relationships are highly structured with multiple outcomes, often for both the mentor and the mentee.

 

Group Mentoring 

Group Mentoring

 

One mentor meets with multiple mentees at a time. Mentees typically have a common or similar goal. This method is especially effective in situations where time and mentoring resources are at a premium. Once a level of trust and openness has been achieved, this model is also effective for tapping into collective knowledge, where shared knowledge and ideas can trigger larger possibilities.

 

Team Mentoring

Team Mentoring 

 

Multiple mentors work with single mentee. The relationship lasts for a limited time, until the goal is achieved or the project is completed. The focus of the mentoring relationship is the function of the group, rather than any psychosocial bonding. The mentors are assembled to act as guides and resources, providing feedback on the work, but it is the responsibility of the mentee to bear the burden of learning and to move the project forward.

 

Peer Mentoring 

Peer Mentoring

 

Another junior faculty member or members provide guidance and/or feedback to a junior faculty member. These relationships can be one-to-one or as a group, and are an informally structured relationship. This type of mentoring can be effective for sharing job related knowledge or to share insight on some of the challenges and experiences the others may encounter.

 

e-Mentoring

E-Mentoring (also known as Online or Telementoring)

 

One mentor works with a single mentee at a time via the Internet. Some programs factor in an initial meeting or periodic face-to-face meetings, if distance is not too much of a barrier, but most do not because to the participants are in vastly separate locales. This type of mentoring is extremely helpful for schools or organizations that have multiple branches around the world. It is also a great way for participants in different locations but common fields to establish mentoring relationships. However, it is important that both parties be self-motivated to maintain regular communications and complete agreed upon tasks without the traditional "face time" to serve as an impetus.

 

Informal Mentoring  

Informal Mentoring

 

The mentee self-selects their mentor, usually initiated as part of a conversation or because the mentor is someone the mentee has identified as a role model. These relationships develop naturally, may not include any formal agreement, and may not have any formalized structure to them. Most of the relationship progresses at the behest of the mentee and even though there are goals, measures of success are seldom kept track of.

 

Reverse Mentoring

Reverse Mentoring 

 

The junior faculty member has more experience or knowledge in a particular area than the senior faculty member. This kind of mentoring can be used when the senior person needs to know about a particular kind of new technology or can be used to encourage diversity and cross generational understanding. For this kind of mentoring to be successful, it is important to remove barriers of status and position and to create a safe, open environment.

 

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© 2014 by Office of Faculty Affairs and Career Development, Wake Forest School of Medicine.

 

All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission of the WFSM Office of Faculty Affairs and Career Development.

 

 

 

Quick Reference

JUMP
Steven M. Block, MBBCH
Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Career Development

336-713-5074

jump@wakehealth.edu

Rita Groce
Program Manager

336-713-5074

jump@wakehealth.edu

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