Research

 

Alain Bertoni PhotoThe Research Program of the Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity (MACHE) aims to become a leader in health equity research, utilizing the resources of the faculty and staff of the Wake Forest School of Medicine and collaborative partners.  The Research Program will advance the conduct of population-impact health research (also known as T4 research), focusing on broad-based, sustainable outcomes that influence health policy in underserved populations.  These aims will be achieved by:

Goals: 

 

  • Collaborating with partners within and external to the medical center to conduct research focused on factors underlying minority health and healthcare disparities and interventions aimed at reducing disparities;
  • Serving as a resource for research development, including planning, conducting, and evaluation of projects led by MACHE-affiliated faculty and collaborators;
  • Serving as a resource for ensuring that, conceptually and methodologically, research projects are relevant to the populations to which they are targeted and that the products of research are meaningful and useful to the people served;
  • Disseminating research findings that impact health disparities within the medical center and to local and national communities impacted by that research; and
  • Advocating for related evidence-based health policy.
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    LROP Logo

    LUMBEE RITE OF PASSAGE 

    Why is this study being done?

    Suicide is a threat to the health of all Americans, but some ethnic groups are more affected than others.  American Indian youth experience high rates of suicide completions, suicide attempts, and suicidal ideation. Many factors contribute to suicidal ideation in American Indian youth, including depressive symptoms, low self-esteem, substance abuse, hopelessness, forced acculturation, and lack of social support. Cultural interventions that utilize cultural practices to intervene on health outcomes, as distinguished from interventions that are merely culturally appropriate have recently been associated with positive health outcomes in American Indians as well as other ethnic groups. Still, while it is highly recommended that interventions targeting mental illness in American Indian youth consider cultural constructs related to health, very few studies have used this approach to-date. (more)

     

    2013 Lumbee Homecoming

    Lumbee Homecoming 2013

     

     

     

     

     

    LROP Mini PowWow Photos

     

     

     

     

    Mini PowWow
    Clyburn Pines

    Lumbee youth participated in a "mini-pow wow" at the Allenton Boy's and Girl's Club on April 30th, 2012.  Many of the dance regalia were maybe by the youth with the assistance of Lumbee tribe youth services staff and parents.  Youth performed various dance styles throughout the evening that they had learned in their culture classes offered by the tribe.  Watch the video below.

     

     

    Proverbs 31 Logo

    NATIVE PROVERBS 31 

    Why is this study being done?

    American Indians (AIs) have higher rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared to whites, and largely because of high rates of factors that increase the risk of CVD, including high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity and tobacco use. Statistics show that smoking and other non-traditional use of tobacco is also higher among AI populations than among other races. AI women are especially affected by these factors. While many of these factors can be improved through changes in health behaviors, culturally appropriate approaches are needed to help address these concerns. (more).

    Charles AdkinsCharles M. Adkins, MPH presented a poster titled “The Enhancement of Health-Related Attitudes & Behaviors in the Affective Domain of Lumbee Indian Women in Robeson County, North Carolina Through a Faith-Based CVD Intervention” on April 12, 2012 at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro Health and Human Performance Building.

    Charles is a graduating Master’s student in Public Health Education at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Hailing from Connecticut, he has a background in Sociology and Medical Biology with an interest in health disparities in international health. During the spring semester of 2012, he interned at the Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity (MACHE) working with Dr. Ronny Bell and Project Staff on the Native Proverbs 31 Health Project. As a graduate intern, his responsibilities included the creation of the project survey database and codebook, data collection and entry, contributions to the design of projects materials, as well as the development and implementation of the Affective Domain Exit Survey – the main focus of the research. The affective domain survey aimed to measure individual achievement in the affective domain, i.e. changes in health-related behaviors, attitudes, and values. The survey was developed throughout the semester and implemented during follow-up data collection.

    Preliminary results indicate that the women who participated in the intervention have made changes in relation to their health-related behaviors and, more importantly, their perceptions of personal and familial health as a result of the Native Proverbs 31 Health Project.

      

    LAY HEALTH ADVISORS:
    A COALITION INITIATIVE

     
    The purpose of the project, “Latino Lay Health Advisors: A Coalition Initiative,” is to educate the Latino community to improve medical literacy and avoid overutilization of acute care settings, such as emergency rooms. Focus areas for the grant are diabetes, heart disease, obesity and other related health problems as well as health care access. The grant was awarded by the N.C. Health and Wellness Trust Fund as part of one of its major health initiatives, the Eliminating Health Disparities Initiative. Dr.  Jorge Calles-Escandón, M.D., is an associate professor of internal medicine and principal investigator of the LHA project. (more).

    The purpose of the project, “Latino Lay Health Advisors: A Coalition Initiative,” is to educate the Latino community to improve medical literacy and avoid overutilization of acute care settings, such as emergency rooms. Focus areas for the grant are diabetes, heart disease, obesity and other related health problems as well as health care access. The grant was awarded by the N.C. Health and Wellness Trust Fund as part of one of its major health initiatives, the Eliminating Health Disparities Initiative. Dr.  Jorge Calles-Escandón, M.D., is an associate professor of internal medicine and principal investigator of the LHA project.

     

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    Last Updated: 12-03-2014
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