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12/28/2006
New research reveals that while cholesterol-lowering drugs do increase the risk of painful inflammation of the pancreas, the side effect is relatively rare, according to Sonal Singh, M.D., from Wake Forest University School of Medicine, and colleagues. “Acute pancreatitis is a fairly common condition and cholesterol-lowering drugs have been implicated in some cases,” said Singh. “Since millions of people around the world take these drugs, our aim was to quantify the risk.” The study, reported in the current issue of Drug Safety, is the first to estimate the risk of pancreatitis from drugs such as Lipitor® and Pravachol®, known as statins. Researchers found that while the drugs increased the risk of pancreatitis by 40 percent – the occurrence is still fairly rare. Out of every 300,000 people taking the drugs for a year, only one would be expected to develop the condition.

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12/28/2006
Strokes strike about 700,000 people each year. Knowing your risk factors could prevent you from becoming a statistic. The Comprehensive Stroke Center at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is offering free stroke screenings during January to help kick off the new year on a healthy note. Our experts in stroke care and rehabilitation from our nationally-recognized stroke center will be on hand to answer your questions. The screenings are free and open to those over 40 years of age. Stroke Screenings will be held at the following locations: Wed. Jan. 10 from 4 to7 p.m. at BestHealth, Sat., Jan. 13, at Comp Rehab Plaza from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., Tues. Jan. 16 at the West Forsyth YMCA from 4 to 7 p.m., Tues. Jan. 23 at the Winston Lake YMCA from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., Thurs. Jan. 25 at BestHealth from 4 to 7 p.m., Tues. Jan. 30 at the Fulton YMCA from11 a.m. until 2 p.m., Tues. Feb. 6 at Kernersville YMCA from 3 until 6 p.m.

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12/21/2006
Students at Wake Forest University School of Medicine are planning a much-enlarged “Share the Health” fair in January designed to encourage the medically underserved to become active participants in their own health care. The eighth annual health fair will be held on Saturday, Jan. 20, 2007 from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. at Marketplace Mall, 2101 Peters Creek Parkway. Admission is free. Members of Wake Forest University athletic teams will be on hand to sign autographs, and speakers from the medical school faculty will be talking about such topics as pediatric obesity, nutrition, exercise and diabetes.

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12/20/2006
Wake Forest University School of Medicine ranked 35th among 123 American medical schools in grant support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), according to recently released rankings for the federal fiscal year that ended on Sept. 30, 2005. (cq) The school’s NIH support totaled $122,685,142. (The school received nearly $190 million from all sources during the Wake Forest fiscal year that ended June 30.) The Department of Public Health Sciences ranked second in the nation among similar departments, and the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology ranked fifth.

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12/20/2006
Wake Forest University School of Medicine is the lead United States partner in a new program for university student and faculty exchange between Brazil and the U. S. The program was recently announced by the U.S. Department of Education. Wake Forest will partner with Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio, and two historically African-American institutions: Central State University in Ohio and Winston-Salem State University. Participants in the program wish to advance the exchange of faculty and students in the biomedical sciences. A consortium of educational institutions in each country has received a four-year grant from the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE). (In the U.S., the grant totals $209,586.) The goal is to provide student interchange including a better understanding of cultural differences. Activities will include development of language skills in Portuguese for the U.S. students studying in Brazil and English for the Brazilian studen

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12/19/2006
Two research projects at Wake Forest University School of Medicine have been named top breakthroughs of the year by national science magazines. Anthony Atala, M.D., has been honored for advances in tissue engineering and Lawrence Rudel, Ph.D., for his research into the danger of trans-fatty acids in foods. The January 2007 issue of Discover magazine names Atala’s work as the No. 2 science story of the year and ranks Rudel’s research as No. 14. In addition, Atala was also recently honored by both Popular Science and Popular Mechanics magazines. Earlier this year, Atala, director of the Institute for Regenerative Medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, announced success implanting laboratory-grown bladders in children and teenagers with spina bifida.

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12/15/2006
Santa Claus will make a special entrance to town courtesy of AirCare, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center’s 24-hour air ambulance service. The jolly old elf will land at Wake Forest Baptist’s helipad on Monday, Dec. 18 at 10 a.m. to greet patients, their families and visitors. The public is invited.

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12/13/2006
Paul Meis, M.D., a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, has received the Public Health Staff Recognition Award. The award, given by GlaxoSmithKline, was in recognition of his work with the Davie and Yadkin County health departments to reduce infant mortality and serious illnesses in newborns. Meis, who has been an obstetrician for 40 years, has published articles focusing on causes of low-birth-weight babies, and pioneered a study to test whether hormone injections could reduce pre-term births.

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12/11/2006
Two researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine are among 58 in the country recently named recipients of “Pathway to Independence” awards from the National Institutes of Health. The awards, of approximately $1 million each, are designed to provide an opportunity for promising postdoctoral scientists to receive support from a mentor and then to establish themselves as independent scientists. The Wake Forest recipients are Ryan Temel, Ph.D., and Deepak Deshpande, Ph.D. The program supports awardees through two phases. The initial one- to two-year mentored phase allows investigators to complete their supervised research work, publish results, and search for an independent research position. The second independent phase, which last three to five years, will allow awardees who secure an assistant professorship or equivalent position to establish their own research program and successfully apply for an NIH grant to support their work.

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12/11/2006
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has received an Award of Distinction from the eHealthcare Leadership Awards for its web site, www.wfubmc.edu. The award was given in the “Best Overall Internet Site” category for hospitals with more than 400 beds. The eHealthcare Leadership Awards drew more than 1,100 entries from health care organizations, online health companies, pharmaceutical firms and business improvement initiatives.

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12/7/2006
Michael V. Rocco, M.D., is the first holder of the newly created Vardaman M. Buckalew Jr. Professorship in the Section on Nephrology of Wake Forest University School of Medicine. The endowed position honors Buckalew, a physician who was head of the Section on Nephrology in the Department of Internal Medicine for 26 years. He recently stepped down from serving as chief of professional services for North Carolina Baptist Hospital and remains in active practice. Buckalew performed seminal research in hypertension, kidney disease resulting from analgesic ingestion, renal tubular disorders and the effect of protein restriction on progression of kidney disease, said Barry I. Freedman, M.D., head of the Section on Nephrology. Rocco has been a member of the nephrology faculty since 1991.

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12/4/2006
Epilepsy specialists at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center have found that brain injury patients in a coma can benefit from prolonged electroencephalographic (EEG) testing that may diagnose whether seizure activity is contributing to their coma state. “EEG monitoring helps us pinpoint a cause as to why the patient may still be suffering from a coma in intensive care units that previously would have gone unrecognized,” Cormac O’Donovan, M.D., an epileptologist, director of the EEG lab and principal investigator for the study at the medical center. “Hopefully by beginning treatment early, we can eliminate or reduce the side effects of prolonged seizures on the brain.” O’Donovan presented his research at the annual meeting of the American Epilepsy Society in San Diego on Monday.

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12/4/2006
Epilepsy specialists at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center are testing an investigational device designed to control seizures in patients with epilepsy. The device is a responsive neurostimulator (RNS™ System) which is implanted in the brain, detects abnormal electrical activity in the brain and sends out electrical impulses to prevent seizures. Wake Forest Baptist is the only center in North Carolina, Tennessee and South Carolina to test the device made by NeuroPace. “This technology offers new hope to patients who have not responded to other treatments currently available and continue to have seizures,” said William Bell, M.D., an epileptologist and principal investigator for the study at the medical center. Unlike the vagal nerve stimulator, another implantable device to treat seizures, the RNS treats the exact area of the brain affected by seizures. These are often areas of the brain that cannot be safely removed by epilepsy surgery. Patients are una

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12/1/2006
“Control the Show” is back. B. J. Sintay, an engineering student in the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, has linked more than 35,000 Christmas lights on his Winston-Salem home to the World Wide Web and offers folks the opportunity to control blocks of those lights from their own computers while watching the action on camera. The lights will be turned on at 5 p.m. today and the show will be even better than last year, thanks to a sponsorship by the School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences (SBES). Last year’s show attracted widespread attention – up to 2 million hits per day to controltheshow.com and dozens of stories by newspapers, radio and television. Members of the media are already showing an interest in covering this year’s production.

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12/1/2006
William B. Applegate, M.D., M.P.H., dean of Wake Forest University School of Medicine, has been elected chair-elect of the Board of Regents of the American College of Physicians (ACP) for 2007-2008. Applegate, who is also senior vice president of Wake Forest University Health Sciences, has been a fellow of the ACP since 1984, a regent since 2002, editor of the ACP’s Medical Knowledge Self-Assessment Program in geriatrics, chairman of its publications committee, and a member of several of its other committees. His election means that he will become chairman of the ACP board in May 2008. The ACP is the nation's largest medical specialty society, representing physicians in internal medicine and its subspecialties, including, endocrinology, rheumatology, infectious diseases, allergy and immunology, and geriatrics. Total membership is about 120,000, including medical students.

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11/30/2006
The first human study using gene transfer to treat erectile dysfunction (ED) shows promising results and suggests the potential for using the technology to treat overactive bladder, irritable bowel syndrome and asthma, according to the researchers. “In the small pilot study, this new therapy was well tolerated and safe,” said George Christ, Ph.D., senior researcher and a professor at the Institute for Regenerative Medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. “It provides evidence that gene transfer is a viable approach to treating ED and other diseases involving smooth muscle cells.” The results of the study, which included 11 men with ED, are reported online today in Human Gene Therapy. The technology was developed by Christ and Arnold Melman, M.D., when they worked together at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, New York.

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11/28/2006
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – With a $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine are exploring whether fat stored around the heart accelerates the development of atherosclerosis. As people gain weight, fat can accumulate in the abdomen, as well as around the heart and other organs. The study will explore the hypothesis that fat around the arteries in the heart contributes to inflammation and to increased risk of fatty deposits in the vessels, which can lead to heart attacks. “This will be a step forward in understanding more about the health effects of fat distribution,” said Jingzhong Ding, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of internal medicine.

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11/27/2006
Recruiting has begun for a national research study of patients with chronic kidney disease to test whether six-times-a-week home dialysis over-night works as well or better than three-times-a-week dialysis, also done at home. The study is one of two dialysis studies getting under way at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. The national study involves hemodialysis, in which the blood is cleaned by a kidney-dialysis machine. It is also known as chronic dialysis therapy because the patient’s kidneys have permanently failed, requiring dialysis for the rest of their lives. Michael V. Rocco, M.D., the national principal investigator, said that about 250 patients would be recruited in the United States and Canada – including at least 12 at Wake Forest Baptist.

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11/27/2006
WINSTON-SALEM, NC -- On November 30, physicians at the Gamma Knife Center at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center will perform Leksell Gamma Knife® stereotactic radiosurgery on one of the world’s tallest men to treat a pituitary tumor and restore his potential for a promising basketball career. Sun Ming Ming, a 23 year-old from China, came to the United States in 2005 hoping to be drafted by the National Basketball Association (NBA). At 7’9” his prospects looked good. Though he was eligible for the draft, he lacked stamina, strength and speed. He was diagnosed with a tumor on his pituitary gland that was responsible for his extraordinary height as well as his lack of performance. The tumor caused the pituitary gland, which is located near the middle of the brain, behind the eyes and nose, to overproduce growth hormone.

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11/22/2006
Total outside support for Wake Forest University Health Sciences (WFUHS) – mostly for research – increased by nearly $1 million, reaching a total of $189,830,035 for the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2006. The increase came despite a tightening federal budget, which saw support from the federal government decline from $152.3 million to $149.4 million. WFUHS has one of the most productive faculties in the country and the decline here was due to the departure of several highly funded investigators, according to Sally A. Shumaker, Ph.D., associate dean for research.

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11/21/2006
The Sickle Cell Patient Action Network (SCPAN) will sponsor an “I’m So Sick of Turkey” fundraiser at Pizza Hut, 2721 Peters Creek Parkway, Monday, Nov. 27, from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. A portion of the proceeds from pizza sales will be donated to the support group. SCPAN is a networking and support group of patients, caregivers and others who advocate for the rights of people with sickle cell disease and provide education and awareness about research and treatment of the disease. Organizers hope that people, who are tired of Thanksgiving dinner leftovers, will be encouraged to order a pizza for a good cause. “The support group provides an invaluable service to our patients and their families,” said Stephany Coakley at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center’s Comprehensive Sickle Cell Program. “Fundraisers like this help us to provide more services to help sickle cell disease patients and caregivers cope with a painful, chronic illness.”

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11/21/2006
A new study shows that blood flow to the legs is relatively normal in people with diastolic heart failure, suggesting other potential causes of their inability to do everyday activities, according to researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. “Reduced tolerance for physical activity is the primary symptom of diastolic heart failure, and it greatly affects quality of life,” said Dalane Kitzman, M.D., professor of cardiology and senior researcher on the study. “This condition will increase as our population ages, so it’s important to pinpoint the reasons for their symptoms and to develop effective treatments.” The study results are reported on-line in American Journal of Physiology – Heart & Circulatory Physiology and will be published in an upcoming print issue. There are an estimated 5 million heart failure patients in the United States, and about half have diastolic heart failure, in which the heart muscle is stiff and doesn’t take in enough bloo

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11/17/2006
New research at Wake Forest University School of Medicine suggests that certain inhaled asthma medications – as well as similar chemicals our bodies produce during times of high stress – may worsen diseases such as asthma, heart failure and lupus that involve inflammation. The scientific team led by Raymond Penn, Ph.D., and Matthew Loza, Ph.D, found that beta-agonists, such as those used in the treatment of asthma, increase the accumulation of type 2 T cells, a type of white blood cell that participates in immune system defense mechanisms. In certain diseases such as asthma and lupus, an over-reactive type 2 T cell response occurs and is believed to contribute to the disease. “Inhaled beta-agonists are very effective in opening up airways and allowing asthmatics to breathe, but their ability to address the underlying inflammation that causes most asthma has been debated for years,” said Penn, an associate professor in the Department of Internal Medicine and the Center f

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11/17/2006
A structured exercise program can boost the physical well-being of sedentary seniors who show early signs of losing independent function. The results hold promise that many older adults can lower their risk of major walking disability, according to researchers from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and colleagues. The results of the pilot study, published in the November issue of the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences and presented today at the annual meeting of the Gerontological Society of America show that sedentary older adults can safely begin a program of moderate exercise and that the program helps to preserve mobility function. The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) pilot study involved 424 older adults and was conducted at four field centers, including Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. The other centers were the Cooper Institute in Dallas, Texas, Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., and the University

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11/17/2006
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center will hold its annual Christmas star lighting and worship service Monday, Nov. 27 at 5:45 p.m. at the employee parking lot on Cloverdale Avenue across from the Shell gas station. The public is invited. This unique outdoor service will be led by the Rev. Dr. Robert E. Sawyer, chaplain of Salem College, and will feature the Medical Center Chorale and the lighting of the star. The 31-foot star is anchored to the roof of Wake Forest Baptist’s North Tower. It weighs 3,400 pounds and is constructed of 26 aluminum points attached to an octagonal-shaped center core. The eight- and 11-foot long points are covered with a vinyl-coated nylon mesh. A 150-watt floodlight illuminates each point. The star was constructed in 1992 by Cosco Sign Co. in Lexington and is believed to be one of the largest Moravian stars ever built.

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11/15/2006
Daniel Krowchuk, M.D., a pediatrician at Brenner Children’s Hospital, has edited a book, “Pediatric Dermatology: A Quick Reference Guide” for family physicians, pediatricians and others who provide primary care for children. The book is available beginning this month through the American Academy of Pediatrics. “The book addresses conditions and disorders that pediatricians and other primary care providers are likely to see,” he said. “It also covers many of the more unusual diagnoses. It is designed to help physicians how to recognize a condition, make the diagnosis, and then manage it.” One of the most helpful parts of the book includes information on how to differentiate between two diagnoses, Krowchuk said. “Sometimes two conditions can look very much alike but can be caused by two different things.”

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11/13/2006
April Yasunaga, M.D., a resident in the internal medicine program at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, is the 2006 recipient of Amanda’s Award from the Domestic Violence Community Council. The award is named for a local survivor who endured years of abuse and who, now as a health care professional herself, is dedicated to helping patients lead safe and healthy lives. Amanda's Award is given annually to a healthcare provider in our community who has demonstrated exceptional commitment to both screening patients for domestic violence and providing them with information about local resources.

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11/11/2006
Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may provide a noninvasive way to monitor neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with lupus, according to results from research in mice at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. “This study is the first to demonstrate that MRS is a feasible method to monitor neuropsychiatric symptoms in lupus,” said Nilamadhab Mishra, M.D., the principal investigator, in a presentation at the American College of Rheumatology meeting in Washington. MRS is closely related to MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), and uses strong magnetic fields and low energy radio waves to get biochemical information about the body. The test is done in an MRI machine to which a spectrometer has been attached to measure changes in metabolites, such as the levels of glutamate and glutamine.

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11/11/2006
Two drugs that a Wake Forest University School of Medicine research team has been investigating for lupus for several years may stabilize atherosclerotic plaque in the walls of arteries and help avert heart attacks and strokes. Nilamadhab Mishra, M.D., and colleagues reported at the American College of Rheumatology meeting in Washington that the two drugs – TSA (trichostatin A) and SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid ) – decreased cholesterol deposits in the walls of arteries. The two drugs are part of a class of drugs called histone deacetylase inhibitors, or HDIs, which work by multiple mechanisms, one of which is anti-inflammatory: they decreased inflammatory proteins produced by macrophages, a type of white blood cell. These inflammatory proteins can make the atherosclerotic plaque unstable. Mishra said. The macrophages were taken from normal mice and the experiments were done in a laboratory setting.

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11/10/2006
R. Duncan Hite, M.D., is one of only 10 national and international recipients of a Humanitarian Recognition Award from the Chest Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP). The $5,000 awards are given to organizations supported by the award recipients, who volunteer their time and expertise to improve the health of communities and people in need worldwide. Hite was recognized for his work with the Hospital Hospitality House of Winston-Salem project, an effort to create a 24-room facility that will provide affordable lodging, food, and support to families of patients at both Wake Forest Baptist and Forsyth medical centers. Plans for the next five to 10 years are to expand the facility to 48 beds. Hite, director of medical intensive care and critical care research in the Department of Internal Medicine-Pulmonary Critical Care, serves on the project’s board of directors.

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11/10/2006
A Wake Forest University School of Medicine team believes it has found biomarkers for lupus that also may play a role in causing the disease. The biomarkers are micro-ribonucleic acids (micro-RNAs), said Nilamadhab Mishra, M.D. He and colleagues reported at the American College of Rheumatology meeting in Washington that they had found profound differences in the expression of micro-RNAs between five lupus patients and six healthy control patients who did not have lupus. “We are the first to show that these micro-RNAs are a problem in human lupus,” said Mishra, an assistant professor of rheumatology.

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11/8/2006
A Colorado-based company is launching a line of “medical- food” products for the dietary management of asthma, eczema and other allergic conditions based on discoveries by Floyd H. “Ski” Chilton, Ph.D., of Wake Forest University Health Sciences (WFUHS). Chilton’s discoveries originally led to the founding of a company called Pilot Therapeutics. Now Pilot Therapeutics and WFUHS have licensed rights to the technology to Efficas Inc. of Boulder, Colo., to allow Efficas to produce and market the therapeutic products, said Michael A. Batalia, Ph.D., director of the Office of Technology Asset Management at Wake Forest. The Efficas™ Care products are aimed at three health conditions: asthma, eczema and allergy. The Efficas Care line is now available for online purchase.

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11/7/2006
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – Wake Forest University School of Medicine is one of 52 academic health centers to receive a National Institutes of Health (NIH) planning grant to prepare for joining a new national research consortium. “The national consortium will transform how clinical and translational research is conducted, ultimately enabling researchers to provide new treatments more efficiently and quickly to patients,” according to an NIH news release announcing the grants. Known as the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA), the new program is expected to provide a total of $500 million annually that will be awarded to about 60 academic health centers when it is fully implemented in 2012. Twelve academic health centers have been funded from this year’s first round of applications.

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11/7/2006
Lei Shi, M.D., Ph.D., a research fellow at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, has received the Marie Curie Award from the Radiation Research Society. The award honors a scholar-in-training showing the highest potential for a successful career in the areas of radiation, biology, chemistry, physics or medicine. As the winner, Shi will present the annual Marie Curie Award lecture at the 58th annual meeting of the Radiation Research Society in Philadelphia in November and will receive a cash award and travel expenses. Shi’s lecture will focus on his work in the laboratory of Judy Brunso-Bechtold, Ph.D., in the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, where scientists are working to learn more about radiation-induced brain injury. Whole-brain radiation is widely used for recurrent brain tumors as well as to prevent the metastasis of breast cancer, lung cancer and malignant melanoma to the brain.

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11/7/2006
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – Raghunatha Yammani, Ph.D., a researcher at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, is one of 14 early-career scientists to receive a 2006 research grant from the American Federation for Aging Research (AFAR). Yammani is an instructor in the Department of Internal Medicine. AFAR, which is dedicated to advancing biomedical research on aging, uses its privately funded research grant program to provide start-up grants to promising early-career medical doctors and scientists studying the basic mechanisms of aging, age-related diseases and the processes underlying common geriatric functional disorders. Yammani’s research focuses on a protein known as S100A4 that is involved in activating an array of signaling molecules in cells. His AFAR-sponsored project is to learn more about the signaling pathways that may be involved in age-related changes in cartilage. The research may help explain the development of osteoarthritis and may ultimately lead t

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11/6/2006
Sharon Castellino, M.D., a pediatric oncologist at Brenner Children’s Hospital, is evaluating whether a drug typically used to treat Alzheimer’s patients, will help brain cancer survivors avoid the learning and memory problems that are common after radiation therapy. Brenner Children’s Hospital is the only center participating in the pilot study. The drug, called Aricept™, will be given daily for six months to brain cancer survivors who have received cranial radiation. Castellino will follow these patients for six months to see if the drug can help prevent a decline in their cognitive abilities. “We know that pediatric brain cancer patients are at risk for developing cognitive problems later in life,” she said. “They may have memory problems, low school performance, declines in IQ, behavioral problems, and these problems may lead to poor quality of life. Patients who receive cranial radiation as part of their treatment regime are at greater risk for developing these

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11/6/2006
This has been a banner year for the Abdominal Organ Transplant Program at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. On the heels of news this summer that the 1,500th transplant was performed, surgeons have now completed their 100th pancreas transplant in the history of the program. “Our program has progressed to the next level in recent years,” said Robert Stratta, M.D., transplant surgeon and director of the Transplant Program. “Our 100th pancreas transplant was a combination kidney-pancreas transplant. Our pancreas transplant program is currently among the top 15 most active in the country and our kidney program is among the top 40 most active.” Pancreas transplants, often performed in conjunction with a kidney transplant, are used to treat diabetes.

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11/2/2006
The incidence of melanoma is increasing at a rate higher than any other cancer. While it currently accounts for approximately four percent of skin cancers, it causes the most skin cancer deaths. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2006 there will be 62,190 new cases of melanoma in the United States and about 7,910 people will die of this disease. On November 7 at 5 p.m. EST, Edward Levine, M.D., professor of surgical oncology at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, and colleagues will perform sentinel lymph node mapping and surgical removal of a melanoma during a live webcast. The sentinel node is the first regional node in the lymphatic drainage pathway from the primary tumor. The tumor status of the sentinel node determines the likelihood of whether the disease has spread to the remaining lymph nodes.

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11/2/2006

Promotions at Wake Forest University School of Medicine Promotions at Wake Forest University School of Medicine Winston-Salem, N.C. - The following faculty members have been promoted from assistant professor to associate professor at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Carl D. Langfeld, Ph.D

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11/2/2006

Promotions at Wake Forest University School of Medicine Promotions at Wake Forest University School of Medicine Winston-Salem, N.C. - The following faculty members have been promoted from instructor to assistant professor at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Gretchen Koontz, M.D., obstetri

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11/2/2006

Promotions at Wake Forest University School of Medicine Promotions at Wake Forest University School of Medicine Winston-Salem, N.C. - The following faculty members have been promoted from instructor to assistant professor at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Werner Bischoff, M.D., internal

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11/2/2006

Promotions at Wake Forest University School of Medicine Promotions at Wake Forest University School of Medicine Winston-Salem, N.C. - The following individuals have been promoted from associate professor to professor at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Barbara J. Nicklas, B.S.E., M.S., Ph

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11/2/2006

Promotions at Wake Forest University School of Medicine Promotions at Wake Forest University School of Medicine Winston-Salem, N.C. - The following individuals have been promoted from associate professor to professor at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Anthony J. Bleyer, B.S., M.D., profe

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11/2/2006
New research shows that higher levels of uric acid are strongly associated with high blood pressure in blacks, suggesting that a simple blood test could predict risk and that treatments to lower uric acid may be a novel way to reduce hypertension-related complications in this population. “The novel angle of our study is that the association between uric acid and hypertension is much stronger in blacks, a group that disproportionately suffers from kidney disease, stroke and other complications of hypertension,” said Philip B. Mellen, M.D., M.S., assistant professor internal medicine, and lead investigator. The results are reported online in Hypertension, a journal of the American Heart Association.

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11/1/2006
Teenagers with reading problems are at significantly higher risk for suicide and for dropping out of school than typical readers, according to a study by Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center researchers. “In our study, poor readers were three times more likely than typical readers to consider or attempt suicide and six times more likely to drop out of school,” said lead author Stephanie Sergent Daniel, Ph.D. “Educators and parents should be aware of the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior among adolescents with reading problems.” The results, reported today in the November issue of the Journal of Learning Disabilities, are from a study of 188 students recruited from six public high schools at age 15. They were followed for a mean of 3.3 years.

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10/31/2006
In the first large-scale analysis of proteins in the brains of individuals addicted to cocaine, researchers have uncovered novel proteins and mechanisms that may one day lead to new treatment options to fight addiction. The results, reported in the current issue of Molecular Psychiatry, released on-line today, show differences in the amounts of 50 proteins and point to profound changes in brain function related to long-term cocaine use, said Scott E. Hemby, Ph.D., of Wake Forest University of Medicine. The researcher used technology so advanced it was like looking for differences in brain tissue with “floodlights” rather than a “flashlight,” he said.

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10/31/2006
The discoverers of the unique mouse line that is resistant to cancer have begun to pin down how the process works and found that white blood cells in these mice overwhelm normal defenses of cancer cells. In a report in Cancer Immunity, a journal of the Academy of Cancer Immunology, posted on line today, Zheng Cui, M.D., Ph.D., and Mark C. Willingham, M.D., of Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues said that several types of white blood cells in the mice attack cancer cells by sensing, finding and surrounding them, forming a “rosette,” and then killing them. “Apparently, the mutation in the cancer-resistant mice renders the white blood cells capable of sensing unique diffusible and surface signals from cancer cells and responding to those signals by migration and physical contact,” they said.

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10/30/2006
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center’s BestHealth® website has received a Health Care Standard of Excellence Award from the Web Marketing Association based on its “Outstanding Achievement in Website Development.” “To be recognized by the Web Marketing Association for outstanding achievement in web development is a prestigious honor,” said Jan Strohl, senior marketing manager for e-business. “It is a tribute to Wake Forest Baptist’s web team’s efforts to bring quality health care information to the people of our region.” There were more than 2,300 entries for this year’s WebAwards. Entries were judged on top web site design, copywriting, innovation, content, interactivity, navigation and use of technology.

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10/27/2006
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is holding a nursing education fair for employees on Tuesday Nov. 7, from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. in Ardmore Cafeteria. The event will offer opportunities for reporters to interview nursing recruiters, workforce development specialists, and university representatives about careers in nursing. Representatives from more than 15 universities and colleges will be on hand to provide information about their nursing education programs. Human Resources representatives from N.C. Baptist Hospital will also be available to answer questions about nursing career opportunities.

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10/27/2006
Wake Forest University baseball pitcher Charlie Mellies will speak at a Pep Fest today (Friday) at about 1:15 p.m. at Hill Magnet School, 2200 Tryon St. (off Sprague Street), at the conclusion of a week-long Step-a-Thon. The Wake Forest Demon Deacon will help award prizes to winning Hill Magnet School students. The Step-a-Thon – “Inspiration and Perspiration” – has been encouraging Hill students to be fit and healthy by meeting daily activity goals. Their progress has been documented by pedometers. The prizes will be given during halftime at a volleyball game to students with the most number of steps. The school’s pep band will play. The Step-a-Thon is being organized by eight Wake Forest University School of Medicine students as part of the N.C. Schweitzer Fellows Program.

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10/26/2006
Ronny A. Bell, Ph.D., M.S., associate professor of public health sciences-epidemiology and prevention at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, has been named interim associate director of the Maya Angelou Research Center on Minority Health. Bell’s primary research interests are chronic disease prevalence, risk factors and prevention with particular emphasis on ethnic minority populations. He also serves as co-director of the Health Sciences Research Master’s Degree Program at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. He is a native of Robeson County and a member of the Lumbee Indian tribe. Bell received his bachelor’s degree in public health nutrition from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a doctorate in nutrition from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and a master’s degree in epidemiology from Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

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10/25/2006
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has received a $125,000 grant from the Avon Foundation to hire two patient navigators to guide minority breast cancer patients through the health care system. This was one of four grants awarded as part of the Avon Walk for Breast Cancer Charlotte, a two-day, 39-mile annual fundraising event Oct. 21-22. Wake Forest Baptist is the only grant recipient in Winston-Salem. Eliminating health care disparities in the community is a major goal of Wake Forest Baptist. This disparity is quite evident in breast cancer patients: while whites account for more cases of breast cancer each year, the mortality rate in non-whites is higher. In Forsyth County in 2002, the mortality rates for whites with breast cancer was 18 percent and for non-whites it was 39 percent. With the Avon grant, a new program called the Survivors in Service (SIS) Navigation Network will be created to target women from the underserved and undertreated African Americ

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10/20/2006
Lori J. Brown has been appointed vice president and administrator of Brenner Children's Hospital, part of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. “We are delighted to announce that Lori J. Brown has joined our staff,” said Donny Lambeth, chief operating officer of North Carolina Baptist Hospital. “She brings a wealth of knowledge and service to the children’s hospital and will help us solidify our relationship with the community and continue offering the best health care for children in this region.” Brown previously served as vice president of regional services at Children’s Hospital and Health System of Wisconsin. In that position she was chief operating officer and chief nurse executive for all regional clinical services including hospitals (hospitals within hospitals) and clinics. Prior to that position, she served as director of Patient Care Support Services and business manager for the division of Patient Care Services for Children’s Hospital of Wis.

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10/20/2006
Michael L. Clements, director of the Downtown Health Plaza of Baptist Hospital, has been elected president of the North Carolina Public Health Association (NCPHA). “As we attempt to address the problems of the health care and wellness of our population it is imperative that the public health and primary health systems join forces,” said Clements. “They both provide vital services which though sometimes different in their approach—prevention versus treatment—the same objective is the improvement of the health status and health quality of life of our community.” “One of my goals during my tenure is to bring these systems together to help address the health care crisis which is occurring in North Carolina. Wellness is more than just the absence of disease.”

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10/20/2006
The Maya Angelou Research Center on Minority Health at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is partnering with Winston-Salem Delta Fine Arts, Inc., to produce a photographic exhibit Nov. 5 through Dec. 22 at Delta Arts Center, 2611 New Walkertown Rd. An opening reception for the exhibit will be held on Sunday, Nov. 5 from 3 p.m. until 5 p.m. The event is free, and the public is invited to attend. In the project called “Voices of African-American Health” 24 African-Americans in Winston-Salem and surrounding areas were provided journals and disposable cameras and allowed one month to document their experiences with illness or with taking care of others who suffer from disease. A range of health conditions is represented in the exhibit, including hypertension, diabetes, cancer, mental illness and infant mortality. While the exhibit focuses mostly on photography, vignettes from each participant’s journal are also included.

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10/19/2006
The Eye Center at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is one of about 100 clinical sites nationally that will evaluate the effects of antioxidants and fish oil on the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The goal of the study is to determine if these nutrients will decrease a person’s risk of progressing to advanced AMD. Previous observational studies have suggested these nutrients may protect vision. “We are excited to participate in this study targeting the new combination of nutrients to help reduce the progression of age-related macular degeneration even further,” said Craig M. Greven, M.D., professor and chairman of ophthalmology and principal investigator at Wake Forest Baptist. “This study may help people at high risk for advanced AMD maintain their vision longer and enhance their quality of life.” The research, funded by the National Institutes of Health, is the second part of the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) project. Five years ago

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10/18/2006
Winston-Salem’s two medical centers will both become completely tobacco-free for all patients, employees, and visitors during 2007.

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10/17/2006
The magical sights and sounds of the 19th annual Festival of Trees are an excellent way for families to kick off the holiday season—with plenty of shopping, entertainment, activities for children and the chance to view decorated trees. The event, held at the Education Building on the Dixie Classic Fairgrounds, is open on Saturday, November 18 from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. and Sunday, November 19 from noon until 5 p.m. Admission is $6 for adults and $2 for children 12 and under. Parking is free. All proceeds from the Festival of Trees support pediatric programs at Brenner Children’s Hospital, part of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. “The Festival of Trees has always been one of the largest fundraisers for Brenner, and it is an event that brings the community together in order to raise money for programs that directly help patients and their families,” said Susan Kennedy, director of Annual Support and Special Projects at the Medical Center. “We encourage ever

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10/16/2006
The Department of Radiation Oncology at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has announced the appointment of four additional physicians to its faculty.

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10/13/2006
As part of the N.C. Schweitzer Fellows Program, eight Wake Forest University School of Medicine students will be holding a Step-a-Thon Oct. 23-27, at Hill Magnet School in Winston-Salem. The Step-a-Thon, “Inspiration and Perspiration,” will encourage students to be fit and healthy, said Jenny Smith, a Schweitzer fellow and fourth-year medical student. “There is a great need for more active lifestyles to be pursued by our nation’s youth,” she said. “According to the American Obesity Association, about 15 percent of children between the ages of 6 and 11 are obese,” said Laura Heringer, a second-year medical student and another fellow. “Given these alarming numbers on obesity among our society’s children, it is important to find ways to make healthy living accessible and fun.”

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10/13/2006
Leslie B. Poole, Ph.D., professor of biochemistry at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, has been named director of the Center for Structural Biology. The announcement came from Douglas S. Lyles, Ph.D., professor and chairman of the Department of Biochemistry, who said that the founding directors of the center, Al Claiborne, Ph.D., and Mark Lively III, Ph.D., “decided to step down after a number of years of extensive effort in establishing the center and raising its profile in the field of structural biology.”

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10/12/2006
Five registered nurses at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center received The Great 100 award during a ceremony held in Greensboro on Oct. 7. The recipients are Lynn Bailey, R.N.C., M.S.N., a staff nurse in the intensive care nursery for Brenner Children’s Hospital; James Bryant, R.N., M.S.N., the director of emergency and transport services; Aaron J. Poller, R.N., M.S.N., a staff nurse in the adult psychiatry unit; Penny L. Roberts, R.N., B.S.N., a staff nurse in the rehabilitation and acquired brain injury unit; Debbie Thomson, R.N., M.S.N., a pediatric nurse practitioner for Brenner Children’s Hospital. The Great 100 recognizes 100 registered nurses throughout North Carolina for their excellence in the nursing profession, contributions to the community, and efforts toward improving patient care and nursing education.

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10/12/2006
Joshua Schwartz, M.D., M.B.A., has joined the Office of Technology Asset Management at Wake Forest University Health Sciences as a licensing associate. “We are excited to have Dr. Schwartz working with us. His medical and business experience rounds out our team,” said Michael A. Batalia, Ph.D., director of the office. Schwartz graduated from the University of North Carolina, received his M.D. from Wake Forest University School of Medicine and was a Charles H. Babcock Scholar at the Babcock Graduate School of Management, where he earned his M.B.A. degree with academic distinction.

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10/12/2006
Contemporary Christian music artist Claire Culbreath Howell will perform in Davis Memorial Chapel at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center on Thursday Oct. 19 at 12:15 p.m. Admission is free.

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10/11/2006
Brian Werner, a second-year medical student from Lancaster, Pa., took first place in the 22nd annual Medical Student Research Day poster competition at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. His poster, “Development of a Novel Nanotechnological Approach to Non-Invasive Assessment of Tissue Pressure,” described a new method of measuring tissue pressure in the body using silver nanoparticles. The Pennsylvania State University graduate explained, “Changes in pressure alter the light-emitting properties of these nanoparticles, which can be measured with a sensor outside the body. The process would measure various tissue pressures such as pressure within compartments of the arms or legs. “ Potentially, the process could measure intracranial or other difficult-to-measure pressures, which are much lower than blood pressure, typically ranging from 10 to 40 millimeters of mercury.

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10/11/2006
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is one of about 20 hospitals nationwide to receive the DREAM (Dream of Reaching Excellence in Anticoagulation Management) Award from Roche Diagnostics. The award is for the Medical Center’s ongoing dedication to providing advanced anticoagulation therapy to its patients and its leadership in anticoagulation therapy in the region. Anticoagulants are medications that interfere with the normal clotting process of blood. They are used to prevent strokes in patients who have mechanical heart valves, who have a heart rhythm problem known as atrial fibrillation, who develop blood clots in the deep veins of the legs and groin, or who have certain other medical conditions.

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10/10/2006
The Center for Excellence in Research, Teaching and Learning (CERTL) at Wake Forest University Health Sciences and three partners, including the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools, have received a $1.25 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to further improve science education at all grade levels in area schools. The project – Research, Education and Linking (REAL) Science Careers – will help teachers to use problem-based learning methods in their classrooms and to develop the needed instructional materials, said Ann Lambros, Ph.D., director of CERTL and assistant dean for medical education at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. The project also will include developing exhibits at SciWorks featuring current research on healthy lifestyle choices. Those exhibits would be turned into traveling kiosks for exhibit in the schools and the community..

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10/10/2006
“Creating Peaceful Families,” a two-day workshop for clergy, lay and youth leaders, advocates, and other human service providers, will be held Oct. 20-21 at Green Street United Methodist Church. The Rev. Al Miles, a nationally recognized author and expert on effective clergy response to family and teen dating violence, will be the guest speaker. A youth rally, Youth W.A.V.E. (Worth and Value Explored), that features drama, music and Miles, will be held Saturday Oct. 21 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the church. Miles is coordinator of the Hospital Ministry Department for Pacific Health Ministry at the Queen's Medical Center in Honolulu, Hawaii, where he chairs the hospital's ethics committee. In 2002, he was appointed by Attorney General John Ashcroft to the National Advisory Committee on Violence Against Women.

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10/9/2006
Five current or former members of the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) called today for Congress to make sweeping changes to deal with a large number of longstanding problems at the agency. “The current FDA system of regulating drug safety has serious limitations and is in need of changes,” they say in Archives of Internal Medicine, released today. Since Congress is ultimately responsible, “it is up to Congress to take the steps necessary to reinvigorate the FDA’s ability to assure the public that approved medical products are safe.” Curt D. Furberg, M.D., Ph.D., professor of public health sciences at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and the lead author, said the five decided to write the analysis after becoming discouraged by the FDA’s inability to fix its own problems.

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10/6/2006
Three sections have been created in the Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy, a part of the Division of Public Health Sciences at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Doug Easterling, Ph.D., associate professor of public health sciences and chairman of the department, said the three new sections are: • The Section on Healthcare Systems and Policy, which brings together faculty who conduct research on the organization and delivery of health care services, on health care inequality, and on healthcare policy, financing, regulation, economics, and ethics. • The Section on Social and Behavioral Sciences, which seeks to improve health and quality of life through research focusing on the effects of diseases and their treatments on individuals and families, as well as research exploring social and psychological factors that influence health behaviors such as physical activity and healthy eating. • The Section on Society and Health, which goes beyond

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10/4/2006
Pediatric researchers at Brenner Children’s Hospital will be testing a new medication to see if it helps children with congenital heart defects. Wesley Covitz, M.D., head of pediatric cardiology, and his team will test whether a drug can prevent a shunt, placed in the heart after a defect is discovered, from clotting. The drug, called Clopidogrel, will be used to help patients who do not have enough blood flow to the lungs due to a heart defect. To treat this condition, a shunt is implanted surgically to keep the arteries open. If a clot forms in or around the shunt, it can be fatal, Covitz said. Approximately 490 patients who will enroll in the study will receive the drug or a placebo. All participants will also receive the currently approved treatment (aspirin therapy) to prevent clots from forming. “We will follow these patients for a year to see if the drug reduces the likelihood of clotting, which is rare, but does occur,” he said. “The trial will include children

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10/2/2006
Six researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine were recognized during the 10th annual Research Awards Day on Sept. 26. Following lectures by the recipients, awards were presented by Richard H. Dean, M.D., president and CEO of Wake Forest University Health Sciences. The New Investigator Award honors researchers who have made significant contributions to scientific literature and who have the potential for an outstanding career as a scientist.

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10/2/2006
About one in every 523 children and adolescents in the United States had physician-diagnosed diabetes in 2001, according to estimates from a major national study called SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth. SEARCH is the largest surveillance effort of diabetes among youth under the age of 20 ever conducted in the United States, said Ronny A. Bell, Ph.D., M.S., associate professor of epidemiology and prevention at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and a SEARCH co-investigator. It is the first look at the burden of diabetes in youth of all major racial and ethnic groups. In a report in the October issue of Pediatrics, study investigators estimate that about 154,000 of roughly 80.7 million children and adolescents nationwide had diabetes in 2001. The number of youth with diabetes varies across major U.S. racial and ethnic groups and across age groups.

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10/2/2006
In 2004, researchers at Wake Forest University determined that modest weight loss through diet and exercise improves physical function and decreases pain in older, overweight adults suffering from knee osteoarthritis (OA). Now, backed by more than $3 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Wake Forest researchers will take their findings a step further through IDEA (Intensive Diet and Exercise for Arthritis), the first study to determine whether intensive weight loss, either alone or combined with exercise, can slow the progression of knee OA. Beginning Oct. 2, the study is recruiting participants in the Piedmont Triad who are overweight, 60 years of age or older and have pain in one or both knees. Participation is free and limited transportation is available. Anyone interested in participating in the study should call the toll-free recruitment telephone line at 1-877-238-4825 (1-877-BE-VITAL).

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9/29/2006

WFUBMC Holds Rehab Reunion to Observe National Rehabilitation Awareness Celebration WFUBMC Holds Rehab Reunion to Observe National Rehabilitation Awareness Celebration WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Rehabilitation Services at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center hosted its 24th Annual Rehab Reunion on

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9/25/2006
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is the winner of the 2006-07 Consumer Choice Award for the Winston-Salem metropolitan area. The award, by National Research Corporation (NRC), honors hospitals that consumers rate as having the highest quality and image. This is the eighth straight year that the Medical Center has received a Consumer Choice award. The award was presented to 234 hospitals nationwide in 180 markets. The winning facilities rank highest in their metropolitan statistical areas, which are defined by the U.S. Census Bureau. Nationally the Consumer Choice Awards are based on a survey of more than 200,000 households, representing 450,000 consumers, in 48 states and the District of Columbia. The Winston-Salem award is based on results from Forsyth, Yadkin, Davie and Surry counties.

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9/22/2006
The Department of Neurology at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has announced the appointment of four additional physicians to its faculty. Michael Guo, M.D., Ph.D. completed his training in physical medicine and rehabilitation at the University of Virginia and graduated from the University of Kentucky’s School of Medicine. He works with the spine center and is trained in all forms of interventional pain management of the spine. Martin Childers, D.O., Ph.D., comes to the Medical Center with funding from the National Institute of Health to study gene therapy in muscular dystrophy, as well as nutritional supplements in the treatment of muscular dystrophy. His primary focus is research in Duchene's and Limb girdle muscular dystrophy.

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9/20/2006
Brenner Children’s Hospital, part of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, has announced the appointment of nine physicians to its faculty.

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9/20/2006
Wake Forest University School of Medicine researchers have found high rates of hunger in surveys of immigrant Latino families in eastern and western North Carolina, southwestern Virginia and Forsyth County. “Although the United States enjoys a relative lack of hunger, there are segments of the N.C. population – Latino immigrants – with hunger more severe than areas of persistent poverty like Appalachia,” said Sara A. Quandt, Ph.D. The overall hunger rate for the U.S. is 4.3 percent. The Wake Forest surveys found that rates of hunger among Latino immigrants ranged from almost twice the national rate (8 percent) to more than eight times the national rate (35.6 percent). The results are reported in the October issue of the Journal of Nutrition.

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9/15/2006
In a national survey of registered nurses, half reported chronic interference of work with their home lives, such as being unable to spend the time they wanted with their families, according to researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues. “Work-family conflict has significant implications for nurses in terms of personal health, their ability to provide quality care and for the nursing profession itself,” said Joseph Grzywacz, Ph.D., an associate professor of family and community medicine and lead author on the study, reported in the current issue of Research in Nursing & Health. The study is the first to provide reliable estimates of how frequently work-family conflict occurs among nurses.

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9/12/2006
Pediatric researchers at Brenner Children’s Hospital will be testing a new medication for Marfan syndrome. Wesley Covitz, M.D., head of pediatric cardiology, and his team will test whether a drug commonly used to treat high blood pressure will be effective in children and young adults with Marfan Syndrome and will compare their findings with results of the currently used beta-blocker medication. Patients will be given the original beta blocker or an angiotensin receptor blocker (the new medication) to slow the enlargement of the aorta (a large artery which carries blood away from the heart) which can result in sudden tearing of the aorta if left untreated. Both drugs are commonly used to treat high blood pressure in adults and the new drug has been found effective in laboratory studies, Covitz said. Marfan syndrome is a relatively rare genetic condition in which patients lack a gene that allows them to make elastic tissue. Patients with the disease tend to be extremely

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9/12/2006
Charles W. Pemble IV, a fourth-year graduate student in the Center for Structural Biology at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, has finished in a tie for first place in the national student poster competition at the American Crystallographic Association meeting in Honolulu. His poster was prepared in conjunction with his mentor, Todd Lowther, Ph.D., assistant professor of biochemistry, and Steven J. Kridel, Ph.D., assistant professor of cancer biology. It described work he is doing to understand the crystal structures involved in aspects of an enzyme called human fatty acid synthase which is responsible for synthesis of long-chain fatty acids. These fatty acids are crucial in human physiology.

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9/11/2006
By analyzing patient characteristics and the particular bacteria causing some patients to develop pneumonia during hospital stays, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has developed treatment guidelines to more effectively target the germs. “We matched the best antibiotic combination to each patient’s characteristics and the particular bugs that we have in our hospital,” said James Beardsley, Pharm.D., lead author of the article in this month’s issue of the journal Chest. “We learned that some of the commonly recommended drugs wouldn’t have worked for many of our patients.” The researchers estimate that antibiotic therapy under the new hospital-specific guidelines will target the correct bacteria in at least 90 percent of cases at risk of being resistant to treatment. If national guidelines were followed, treatment may have correctly targeted the germs in only 70 percent of cases.

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8/31/2006
Brenner Children's Hospital and WMAG 99.5 will present the Cure Kids Cancer Radiothon live from the children’s hospital’s pediatric oncology unit on September 21 - 23. The radiothon will be held between the hours of 5:30 a.m. until 7 p.m. on Thursday and Friday, and from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Saturday. The radio crew will be on the ninth floor of Brenner Children’s Hospital. The event will feature current and former cancer patients, who will tell their stories of hope and triumph to radio personalities including Bill Flynn and Lora Songster. Listeners can phone in donations during the Radiothon by calling 1-888-780-8811. As the only children’s hospital in this region, Brenner Children’s Hospital offers a dedicated pediatric oncology program. The childhood cancer treatment team at Brenner Children’s Hospital includes pediatric oncologists, surgeons, radiation oncologists, pediatric oncology nurses, specially trained psychologists, social workers, child life specialists

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8/31/2006
Janice D. Wagner, D.V.M., Ph.D., has been appointed director of the Animal Resource Program (ARP) and attending veterinarian of Wake Forest University, and Richard W. Young, D.V.M., has been appointed associate director. The positions encompass all campuses of Wake Forest University. The announcement came from Sally A. Shumaker, Ph.D., associate dean for research at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. “Dr. Wagner’s combination of research and veterinary expertise was determined to best suit the needs of the university,” she said. “At this time of growth within our animal research program, we are fortunate to have someone of Dr. Wagner’s caliber bringing her considerable clinical and research skills to her new role.”

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8/31/2006
A Winston-Salem Symphony string quartet will perform a selection of familiar light classics and show tunes Tuesday, Sept. 12 at 12:15 p.m. in Davis Memorial Chapel at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. The public is invited and admission is free. Also, symphony music director Robert Moody will be on hand with a preview of the symphony’s new season. The program is part of the Arts Alive! performance series sponsored by the Wake Forest Baptist Committee on Visual and Performing Arts and the Hawthorne Hill Society. For information, contact Jim Steele, (336) 716-3487.

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8/30/2006
Dale Folwell’s attempt to break a world motorcycle endurance record on his Honda Gold Wing by riding 32,000 miles in 30 days touching all 48 contiguous states will test his endurance, but Folwell says it hardly compares with the courage, patience and hope of the 90,000 Americans currently on organ transplantation waiting lists. Folwell’s ride is the kickoff to a fundraising initiative to benefit the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, a national leader in research on tissue and organ regeneration. The institute reported earlier this year successful transplantation of the first laboratory-grown human bladders.

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8/30/2006
Stephen Kritchevsky, Ph.D., has been named director of the J. Paul Sticht Center on Aging at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. The center is a research program focused on improving the health of older adults and preventing age-related disability. With the naming of the new director, the School of Medicine will also expand the center's efforts by bringing new researchers to the institution as well as increasing collaborations between basic research scientists and those who study disease in humans. “The center’s focus is to learn more about how age and disease affect older adults and to develop strategies that reduce the functional problems that can result. Our goal is to increase the ‘health-span’ of older adults,” said Kritchevsky.

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8/29/2006
J. Dale Browne, M.D., has been named the James A. Harrill Professor and Chairman of the Department of Otolaryngology (Division of Surgical Sciences), at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, replacing W. Frederick McGuirt, M.D., who stepped down as chairman after leading the department for eight years. McGuirt received the Honored Surgeon Award from the N.C. chapter of the American College of Surgeons at the chapter’s meeting this summer, in recognition of his longstanding leadership in the field of surgery. Browne’s appointment as chairman was effective Aug. 1. He has been on the faculty of the Medical Center since 1989, and is one of the region’s leading surgical oncologists. He specializes in skull base surgery, head and neck cancer, and surgical reconstruction.

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8/29/2006
A Wake Forest University School of Medicine team will try to understand what differences exist in the brains of people diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder and how the differences may be related to these diseases. Under a five-year $1.1 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health, the team will be comparing post-mortem brain tissue from individuals who had been diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder with tissue from normal individuals who had not been diagnosed with those diseases... The principal investigator, Scott E. Hemby, Ph.D., said the research focuses on the brain’s temporal lobe, particularly on structures called the hippocampus, subicullum and entorhinal cortex that are involved in learning and memory.

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8/28/2006
The first Concours de Graylyn event will take place at Graylyn Conference Center on Sept. 16 from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. The event features a collection of pre and post-World War II automobiles in the original condition. Private collectors from Seattle, Toronto and Los Angeles are planning to take part in the event, which will include vintage automobiles such as Bentley, BMW, Rolls Royce, Mercedes-Benz, Ferrari, and Alfa Romeo. Event founder and cancer survivor William Dymond says his dream is to launch a premiere national concours in North Carolina to raise awareness and financial support for Brenner Children's Hospital -- one of the nation's best children’s hospitals, according to Child Magazine. “We envision an outstanding annual Triad Concours event that will rapidly grow to the stature of Pebble Beach, Meadowbrook, Amelia Island, and the Hilton Head Concours d'Elegance,” Dymond said.

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8/25/2006
An analysis combining 11 separate research studies found that blacks with diabetes have poorer control of blood sugar than whites, according to researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues. “This lower level of control may partly explain why blacks have disproportionately higher rates of death and complications from diabetes,” said Julienne Kirk, PharmD, lead author of the study published on-line today (Aug. 25) in Diabetes Care. Kirk said the findings point to the need to determine why the difference in control exists and to identify ways to prevent or reduce the resulting health problems. Poor blood sugar control can result in long-term complications such as blindness, amputation and end-stage kidney failure.

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8/23/2006
Kenneth L. Koch, M.D., director of the Digestive Health Center at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, will be among the gastroenterologists taking part in the first annual Digestive Motility Awareness Day at Shea Stadium when the New York Mets meet the Philadelphia Phillies this Saturday, Aug. 26 in Flushing, N.Y. Koch and other members of the Gastroparesis and Dysmotilities Association (GPDA) will distribute information about digestive motility problems to those attending the game. Digestive motility refers to the movement of food through the digestive tract. According to the GPDA as many at 25 percent of all Americans suffer with routine symptoms of upper or lower digestive distress. Those symptoms—often triggered by food—include daily or weekly bouts of nausea, heartburn, regurgitation, bloating, an early feeling of fullness with meals, abdominal pain or constipation. Digestive motility problems result primarily from neurological malfunctioning in the muscular walls

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8/23/2006
In the face of rapidly increasing numbers of adults and children with diabetes, Wake Forest University School of Medicine has created a new diabetes research center to expand already extensive research on the disease through the development of programs that integrate basic and clinical research. Donald W. Bowden, Ph.D., has been named director of the Wake Forest University School of Medicine Diabetes Center by William B. Applegate, M.D., M.P.H., senior vice president of Wake Forest University Health Sciences and dean of the medical school. “The Diabetes Center will be a multidisciplinary research and education center that will collaborate with a large variety of programs and centers,” said Applegate, who said that Bowden would report directly to him.

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8/22/2006
First- and second-year students at Wake Forest University School of Medicine were expecting a standard lecture on the brain and nervous system. Instead, a semi-conscious, vomiting “patient” was rolled into the lecture hall and the doctors-to-be were asked to help manage the case. “SimMan™,” a reproduction of an average-size adult, is more than a typical mannequin. The simulated patient makes realistic heart, lung, and bowel sounds and can be programmed to have various medical problems – which students can work to treat. Students can also use SimMan to practice procedures such as giving injections and inserting urinary catheters or breathing tubes. Many medical schools use such computerized simulated patients to teach clinical skills. Wake Forest is one of the first schools to use this technology in live large group lecture settings to teach basic science principles.

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8/21/2006
A new survey of 6,810 teens showed that more than half of them work, and 514 of them had been injured on the job. “The findings from this study clearly indicate that work-related injuries among youth are a significant health problem,” report Kristina M. Zierold, Ph.D., assistant professor of family and community medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, and Henry A. Anderson, M.D., chief medical officer of the Wisconsin Division of Public Health. Writing in the American Journal of Health Behavior, the authors report that 150 of the teens were injured severely enough that activities at home, work, or school were affected for more than three days, and 97 filed for workers’ compensation.

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8/21/2006
Kristy F. Woods, M.D., M.P.H., has resigned as director of the Maya Angelou Research Center on Minority Health at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, effective Aug. 25. In a letter to the center’s national advisory board members, Woods said, “It has been my honor and pleasure to serve as the director of the Angelou Research Center.... Over the past three years the center has gained local and national recognition in its efforts to address health disparities and minority health issues.” Woods was hired as the center’s director and as a professor of internal medicine in June 2003. During her tenure, the center secured several grants totaling more than $850,000 to implement minority health research and programs. A network of collaborative partnerships has been created across the state and region to increase health literacy in African American, American Indian and Hispanic communities.

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8/18/2006
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – The Heart Center Dining Program at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center will host a series of dinner-time talks providing free information about nutrition and heart disease every Tuesday from Sept. 12 through Oct. 10 at California Fresh Buffet, 1370 Peters Creek Parkway. The public is invited to attend. According to the American Heart Association, more than 50 million Americans suffer from a group of risk factors called the metabolic syndrome. Those risk factors, including abdominal obesity and insulin resistance, will be discussed at the first talk in the series. Children and adults who suffer from the metabolic syndrome have a greater chance of developing type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease and other conditions related to plaque buildup in artery walls, including stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Heart Center Dining Program Fall Lecture Series schedule: Tuesday, Sept. 12 – Childhood Obesity, Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome

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8/17/2006
An art exhibit and a series of lectures at the Gateway Gallery at The Enrichment Center and Senior Services Inc., will explore Alzheimer’s disease, a puzzling form of dementia, now through Sept. 16. All events are free and open to the public. “The Alzheimer’s Project” is the inaugural project of the “City of Arts and Medicine Series” sponsored by the Northwest Area Health Education Center (AHEC) at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Senior Services Inc. and The Enrichment Center. To register or for more information, contact Joyce Allen, (336) 713-7726, jeallen@wfubmc.edu. For gallery information, call the Gateway Gallery at The Enrichment Center, (336) 777-0076 or visit the Website, www.enrichmentcenter.org

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8/17/2006
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – Of the four million survivors of stroke each year in the United States, as many as 30 percent will experience a tightness of the muscles in the arms and legs, known as spasticity. To help patients cope with this problem, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has opened a new spasticity clinic at CompRehab Plaza. The clinic will offer botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) as a treatment option. New research shows that repeated treatments of botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) over one year after a stroke can improve muscle tone and reduce pain in the arms and hands, making it easier for patients to dress themselves and perform personal hygiene.

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8/14/2006
Five students in the Wake Forest University School of Medicine Ph.D. program in molecular medicine have recently won awards for their research. The training program is one of the first in the country to provide clinical training to doctoral students who are studying the biology of cells and molecules. “The overall objective of the program is to educate future investigators in research that translates to human disease,” said Charles McCall, M.D., professor of molecular medicine. “These awards attest to the program’s success.” The training program is one of two molecular medicine programs in the country funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to train four students a year. Of 35 students currently enrolled in the program, six have been supported by the training grant and nine have been awarded individual fellowships from the NIH or other organizations.

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8/9/2006
The same chemical in the body that is targeted by the drug Viagra® also helps our brains “boot up” in the morning so we can process sights, sound, touch and other sensory information. The discovery could lead to a better understanding of major brain disorders, according to researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine. “We’ve learned new information about how our brains process sensory information, which may help increase our understanding of what goes awry in conditions such as schizophrenia, attention deficit disorder and epilepsy,” said Dwayne Godwin, Ph.D., associate professor of neurobiology and anatomy and senior author of the study, reported on-line in the journal Neuroscience. Through studying ferrets, the researchers set out to understand the role of nitric oxide, a small gaseous molecule with big roles in health. The drug Viagra acts by slowing down the breakdown of nitric oxide in the penis, leading to increased blood flow. The heart drug nitrogl

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8/9/2006
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center will participate in a national research study to observe the effects of vagal nerve stimulators and antidepressants in participants with treatment-resistant depression. Wake Forest Baptist will be one of about 100 centers in the study, which will involve 1,000 people who have had a vagal nerve stimulator implanted for treatment-resistant depression and 1,000 participants who are on antidepressant drug therapy. Similar to a pacemaker, a vagal nerve stimulator is a silver-dollar-sized device that is implanted under the skin near the collarbone. A wire lead under the skin connects the device to the vagus nerve in the neck. The battery-powered device produces weak electrical signals that travel along the vagus nerve to the brain at regular intervals.

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8/8/2006

Bariatric Surgery Program at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center designated a Center of Excellence for Bariatric Surgery by Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina. The Centers of Excellence program focuses on appropriate patient selection, comprehensive pre-operative evaluation, excellent surgical outcomes, careful and long term post-operative support and follow-up, and continuous improvement of care, outcomes and patient satisfaction.

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8/8/2006
Reducing the size of abdominal fat cells – which are a risk factor for diabetes and heart disease – takes more than cutting calories, according to new research from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Early results from a five-year study show that exercise should be added to the equation.

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8/7/2006
The frequency of adolescents viewing wrestling on TV was positively associated with date fighting and other violent behaviors, according to a study, published by researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine in the August issue of Pediatrics.

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8/3/2006
An evolving and expanding program of Core Teaching Faculty at Wake Forest University School of Medicine is bringing new innovations to a curriculum that was completely revamped in 1998.

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8/1/2006
New findings about how prostate cancer cells are able to resist hormone treatment and defy death may lead to more effective drug treatments, according to researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues.

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8/1/2006
Seed Stage Associates LLC, a wholly owned for-profit subsidiary of Wake Forest University Health Sciences (WFUHS), has won renewal of its contract with the University of North Carolina General Administration to provide technology transfer services to 11 of the university’s 16 campuses. It is the fourth year of the contract.

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7/31/2006
Through studying pigeons with genetic heart disease, researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine have discovered a clue about why some patients’ heart vessels are prone to close back up after angioplasty.

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7/31/2006
Retired U.S. Air Force Col. Deborah A. Kretzschmar, M.D., has joined the Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center as an assistant professor of internal medicine–gastroenterology.

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7/28/2006
Three new research groups have been organized in the 100-member Department of Biostatistical Sciences, which was established earlier this year as part of the Division of Public Health Sciences at Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

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7/28/2006
Despite a widely held belief that the heart drug digitalis shouldn’t be given to patients with diastolic heart failure, a new analysis shows it is relatively safe.

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7/27/2006
Learning more about the decline in learning and memory that can accompany aging is the focus of a $6.2 million grant Wake Forest University School of Medicine has been awarded from the National Institute on Aging.

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7/26/2006
The drug eszopiclone, marketed as Lunesta™, significantly improved sleep in elderly people with chronic insomnia, according to a report by W. Vaughn McCall, M.D., M.S., and six colleagues.

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7/26/2006
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is the first hospital in the Triad to offer a new type of hip surgery that is an alternative to standard total hip replacement. Approved by the Food and Drug Administration in May, the Birmingham Hip Resurfacing System is designed to remove less of the patient’s bone than traditional hip replacement surgery.

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7/25/2006
Studies at Wake Forest Baptist show patients with pancreatic cancer may benefit from a treatment that combines chemotherapy with radiation therapy after surgery.

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7/21/2006
Patents covering a new procedure for diagnosing esophageal reflux disease developed by a Wake Forest University Health Sciences (WFUHS) otolaryngologist has been licensed to Bayer HealthCare’s Diagnostics Division by WFUHS.

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7/18/2006
Two studies of immigrant farmworker families in North Carolina and Virginia found evidence of pesticide exposure in young children, and prompted researchers to call for pesticide safety training for workers’ spouses.

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7/14/2006
Mental health providers can be successfully located with or in pediatric practices, according to researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and the N.C. Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

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7/12/2006
Thomas DuBose Jr., M.D., of Winston-Salem, has been named the Tinsley R. Harrison, M.D. Chair of Internal Medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

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7/12/2006
The medical genetics laboratory at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has been awarded accreditation by the Commission on Laboratory Accreditation of the College of American Pathologists (CAP), based on the results of a recent on-site inspection.

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7/12/2006
Ronald J. Zagoria, M.D., professor of radiology at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, has been appointed editor-in-chief of the medical journal Emergency Radiology.

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7/11/2006

PET Confirms Link between Receptors and Cocaine Abuse PET Confirms Link between Receptors and Cocaine Abuse WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Using positron emission tomography (PET), researchers have established a firm connection between a particular brain chemistry trait and the tendency of an individual to abuse

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7/6/2006
People over 65 who are depressed or anxious turn to complementary or alternative medicine more often than older people who are not anxious or depressed – but not to treat their mental symptoms. Joseph. G. Grzywacz, Ph.D., and colleagues from Wake Forest University School of Medicine reported in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine that 34.9 percent of people over 65 who had symptoms of anxiety or depression used complementary or alternative medicine (CAM), compared to 26.5 percent of those without mental symptoms.

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6/29/2006
The Maya Angelou Research Center on Minority Health at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and the National Marrow Donor Program will sponsor a marrow donor drive targeting African-American, Latino/Hispanic, Native American and Asian people Saturday July 8 at Mt. Zion Baptist Church, 950 File St.

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6/29/2006
A record 53 medical students – nearly half the class of 2009 – are conducting summer research projects under a Medical Student Research Training Program at Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

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6/28/2006
Jennifer Wolfgang, D.O., an endocrinology fellow at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, is one of five fellows nationwide to receive an award for outstanding research.

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6/27/2006
Officials at Brenner Children’s Hospital will move its Greensboro outpatient clinic offices and offer expanded services, beginning in July.

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6/27/2006
Black women – even if their weight is normal – may be at increased risk for insulin resistance, a condition associated with diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart vessel disease, according to new research by Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

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6/20/2006
Patients undergoing difficult medical procedures may benefit from getting advance detailed information about how unpleasant they might feel, according to researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues.

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6/19/2006
A record 53 medical students – nearly half the class of 2009 – are conducting summer research projects under a Medical Student Research Training Program at Wake Forest University School of Medicine.Last year, a then-record 46 students participated, according to Richard St. Clair, Ph.D., chairman of the intramural research support committee, which reviews the student applications. “Last year and this year, we felt the applications were so strong that all the students should be funded.”

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6/19/2006
The “apple” body shape that increases the risk of diabetes and heart disease may be accelerated by eating trans fat such as partially hydrogenated vegetable oil, according to new animal research at Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

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6/13/2006
Treating certain lung cancer patients with surgery followed by radiation therapy can improve their chances of long-term survival, according to a study of more than 7,000 patients. The results, which suggest the need to reconsider radiation therapy’s role in treatment, are reported today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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6/12/2006
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – Matthew S. Edwards, M.D. received the Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award of the American Vascular Association (AVA) at the 60th Vascular Annual Meeting on June 1in Philadelphia, Pa. Edwards, assistant professor of surgery at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center was selected for the honor for a preliminary study that suggests that using minimally invasive balloon angioplasty is almost as effective as more traditional surgery to restore blood flow to kidneys damaged by hypertension or other disorders.

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6/12/2006

N.C. Baptist Hospital Honors Its Volunteers N.C. Baptist Hospital Honors Its Volunteers WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - In conjunction with National Volunteer Week, North Carolina Baptist Hospital honored 95 of its volunteers at a luncheon, April 28, held at The Hawthorne Inn and Conference Center. The hospital ha

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6/9/2006

Giannini Brass to Perform Concert of Patriotic Music at WFUBMC Giannini Brass to Perform Concert of Patriotic Music at WFUBMC WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - The Giannini Brass will perform a concert of patriotic music Thursday, June 15 at 12:15 p.m. in Davis Memorial Chapel at Wake Forest University Baptist Medic

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6/9/2006

Migraine Headaches & Sexual Desire May be Linked, New Research Shows Migraine Headaches & Sexual Desire May be Linked, New Research Shows WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Contrary to the popular cliché, "Not tonight, I have a headache," new research suggests that not all headache sufferers avoid sexual acti

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6/7/2006

Hand Therapists At Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center to Hold Open House Hand Therapists At Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center to Hold Open House WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - In observance of Hand Therapy Awareness and Injury Prevention Week (June 12-16), hand therapists at Wake Forest Uni

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6/5/2006
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – Using a “clot buster” drug normally reserved for treating patients during a heart attack, emergency room doctors were able to double the number of patients who could be revived from cardiac arrest. This sudden loss of heart function occurs in more than 260,000 people a year nationwide – and at least 93 percent of them die. “Clot-busting agents show promise as a new therapy for this abrupt and catastrophic loss of heart function,” said William P. Bozeman, M.D., an emergency medicine specialist at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and lead author on the study, reported in the June issue of the journal Resuscitation and available now on-line.

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6/5/2006

Kids' Triathlon to Benefit Brenner Children's Hospital Kids' Triathlon to Benefit Brenner Children's Hospital WINSTON-SALEM - The fourth annual Kids for Kids Triathlon, benefiting Brenner Children's Hospital, will be held on Saturday, July 15 at 8 a.m. at Wake Forest University. Kids ages 7 to 10 will

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6/2/2006

Eye Screenings for Diabetics Scheduled in Surry County Eye Screenings for Diabetics Scheduled in Surry County WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Surry County residents who have diabetes and are uninsured or on Medicaid are invited to participate in free eye screenings to detect diabetic retinopathy, the leading caus

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6/2/2006

Research Group Develops Pesticide Management Materials for American Indians Research Group Develops Pesticide Management Materials for American Indians WINSTON-SALEM, NC -- A team of researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine has developed a set of educational materials designed to increa

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6/1/2006

Researchers Studying Value of Shorter, More Intense Treatment for Prostate Cancer Researchers Studying Value of Shorter, More Intense Treatment for Prostate Cancer WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center are participating in a large, multi-site national research

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6/1/2006

Wake Forest Researcher Warns Against Making Connection Between Presence of Measles Virus and Autism Wake Forest Researcher Warns Against Making Connection Between Presence of Measles Virus and Autism WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - An American scientist whose research replicates a connection published in England

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5/31/2006

Moderate Alcohol Intake Associated with Better Mental Function in Older Women Moderate Alcohol Intake Associated with Better Mental Function in Older Women WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Research involving more than 7,000 older women found that those who drink a moderate amount of alcohol have slightly higher lev

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5/30/2006

Heart Center Cardiologist to Repair Adult Congenital Heart Defect Live on Internet Using Minimally Invasive Procedure Heart Center Cardiologist to Repair Adult Congenital Heart Defect Live on Internet Using Minimally Invasive Procedure WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - A cardiologist at Wake Forest University Baptis

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5/24/2006

Characteristics of Caregivers May Increase Symptoms in Dementia Patients Characteristics of Caregivers May Increase Symptoms in Dementia Patients WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Troublesome symptoms that accompany dementia - including wandering, hallucinations and restlessness - may increase if the patients' careg

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5/24/2006

WFUBMC Dedicates $147 Million To Benefit Community Health WFUBMC Dedicates $147 Million To Benefit Community Health WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center dedicated $147.2 million of its total $1.348 billion budget - 10.9 percent - toward initiatives that strengthen the fou

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5/18/2006

Fraternity/Sorority Members Who Get Drunk Weekly At Higher Risk of Injuries and Sexual Victimization Fraternity/Sorority Members Who Get Drunk Weekly At Higher Risk of Injuries and Sexual Victimization WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Members or pledges of college fraternities and sororities are twice as likely a

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5/16/2006

New Research Building Opens, Inaugurating Expanded Piedmont Triad Research Park New Research Building Opens, Inaugurating Expanded Piedmont Triad Research Park WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - A research facility tailored to meet the needs of two of Wake Forest University's premier research areas was dedicated Tues

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5/15/2006

Nurses Receive Excellence Award at Ceremony Nurses Receive Excellence Award at Ceremony Fifty-eight nurses were honored at the Sixteenth Annual Nursing Excellence Awards Ceremony at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center Tuesday evening. Wake Forest Baptist nurses were nominated for this awa

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5/12/2006

Ferrario Named Honorary Member of Spanish Hypertension Society Ferrario Named Honorary Member of Spanish Hypertension Society WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center hypertension specialist Carlos M. Ferrario, M.D. was recently named an honorary member of the Spanish Society o

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5/12/2006

Ferrario Receives Distinguished Alumnus Award from Cleveland Clinic Foundation Alumni Association Ferrario Receives Distinguished Alumnus Award from Cleveland Clinic Foundation Alumni Association WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center hypertension specialist Carlos M. Ferrari

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5/12/2006

Free Skin Cancer Screening at WFUBMC Free Skin Cancer Screening at WFUBMC WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Dermatologists from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and the community will conduct a free skin cancer screening from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Thursday, May 18 at the Medical Center's dermatology

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5/12/2006

A new high-technology medical device used with MRI scanners that helps doctors watch the beating heart has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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5/10/2006

Heart Center at WFUBMC Designated a Blue Cross and Blue Shield of N.C. Cardiac Center of Excellence Heart Center at WFUBMC Designated a Blue Cross and Blue Shield of N.C. Cardiac Center of Excellence WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - The Heart Center at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has been designat

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5/9/2006

Gypsy Violist at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center Gypsy Violist at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Violist Christina D. Placilla will perform in Davis Memorial Chapel at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center Thursday May 18 at 12:15 p.m. Admissio

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5/8/2006

Lab Mice Cured of Cancer after Receiving White Blood Cells from Cancer-Resistant Mice Lab Mice Cured of Cancer after Receiving White Blood Cells from Cancer-Resistant Mice WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - White blood cells from a strain of cancer-resistant mice cured advanced cancers in ordinary laboratory mice, researc

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5/3/2006

Graduate Student Wins Prestigious Award Graduate Student Wins Prestigious Award WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Jill Wykosky, a graduate student at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, is the recipient of a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award from the National Institute of Neurological Disord

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5/2/2006

Scientist Works to Improve Treatment for Brain Tumors Scientist Works to Improve Treatment for Brain Tumors WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - With a five-year, $1 million grant from the National Cancer Institute, a Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center researcher will work to improve the effectiveness of a

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4/28/2006

Ninth Annual Excellence Triathlon set for May 20 Ninth Annual Excellence Triathlon set for May 20 WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - The Women's Health Center of Excellence at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center will hold its ninth annual Excellence Triathlon beginning at 8 a.m. on Saturday, May 20 at Tan

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4/26/2006

Skin Disease Common among Hispanic Farmworkers in North Carolina, Research Shows Skin Disease Common among Hispanic Farmworkers in North Carolina, Research Shows WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Wake Forest University School of Medicine studies of Hispanic farmworkers in North Carolina found that more than three ou

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4/26/2006

WFUBMC Joins Statewide Effort to Improve Surgical Patient Care WFUBMC Joins Statewide Effort to Improve Surgical Patient Care WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has joined forces with 13 other North Carolina hospitals on a nationally-based project to improve the care of p

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4/25/2006

Brenner Children's Hospital to participate in Bike Rodeo on May 6 Brenner Children's Hospital to participate in Bike Rodeo on May 6 The Forsyth County chapter of SAFE KIDS will hold a Bike Rodeo, to celebrate National SAFE KIDS Week, on May 6 from 12 to 3 p.m. in the parking lot of Toys R'Us, on Silas Cr

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4/24/2006

Doctors Learn More about Diagnosing Rare Form of Cancer Doctors Learn More about Diagnosing Rare Form of Cancer WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Their experience treating a rare type of abdominal cancer has helped physicians at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center make a new discovery that may change the w

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4/18/2006

Arcury, Quandt Receive National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Award Arcury, Quandt Receive National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Award WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Two senior Wake Forest University School of Medicine faculty members have received a top award from the National Inst

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4/17/2006

Hypertension Specialists at WFUBMC Discover Treatment to Improve Blood Pressure Control Hypertension Specialists at WFUBMC Discover Treatment to Improve Blood Pressure Control WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Physicians at the Hypertension and Vascular Disease Center at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center

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4/17/2006

Internationally Recognized Glaucoma Expert to Address Maya Angelou Research Center Internationally Recognized Glaucoma Expert to Address Maya Angelou Research Center WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Eve J. Higginbotham, M.D., an internationally recognized expert on glaucoma will deliver the 2006 spring lecture at

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4/13/2006

Web-based Course To Help Doctors Be More Informed Drug Prescribers Web-based Course To Help Doctors Be More Informed Drug Prescribers WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine will develop a web-based course designed to give health care providers the information they

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4/12/2006

Researchers to Develop New Way to Analyze Study Data Researchers to Develop New Way to Analyze Study Data WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - A statistician and an economist at Wake Forest University School of Medicine are among 11 groups in the country awarded grants by the National Science Foundation to find new and

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4/12/2006

Three Orthopaedic Surgeons Join Wake Forest Baptist Three Orthopaedic Surgeons Join Wake Forest Baptist WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Three orthopaedic surgeons have recently joined Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Cristin Ferguson, M.D., is an assistant professor who specializes in sports me

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4/11/2006

National Teacher Training Network Headquartered at Wake Forest University School of Medicine National Teacher Training Network Headquartered at Wake Forest University School of Medicine WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - A support program at Wake Forest University School of Medicine for K-12 teachers has expanded t

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4/11/2006

Wake Forest Medical Training Programs Nationally Ranked Wake Forest Medical Training Programs Nationally Ranked WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Wake Forest University School of Medicine ranks 18th in family medicine, 20th in geriatrics, 25th in primary care and 41st in research among the nation's medical schools i

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4/10/2006

Inadequate Housing May Contribute to Poor Health in Immigrant Farmworker Families Inadequate Housing May Contribute to Poor Health in Immigrant Farmworker Families WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -Many Hispanic farmworker families in North Carolina live in inadequate housing that puts them at higher risk of exposu

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4/6/2006

Scientists Learn More about How Viruses Reproduce, Spread Scientists Learn More about How Viruses Reproduce, Spread WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Biochemists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine have made a surprising discovery about the inner workings of a powerful virus - a discovery that they hope cou

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4/5/2006

Brain Scans Show Depressed Monkeys Have Same Central Nervous System Characteristics as People Brain Scans Show Depressed Monkeys Have Same Central Nervous System Characteristics as People WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Depressed monkeys not only look and act like depressed people, but their central nervous sys

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4/3/2006

The first human recipients of laboratory-grown organs were reported today by Anthony Atala, M.D., director of the Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

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4/3/2006

Brenner Children's Hospital Pediatrician Encouraging Parents To Be Involved In Mediating Media Use for Their Children Brenner Children's Hospital Pediatrician Encouraging Parents To Be Involved In Mediating Media Use for Their Children WINSTON-SALEM - Parents' active involvement in what their children ar

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3/29/2006

Feldman Delivers the Clarence S. Livingood Lectureship Feldman Delivers the Clarence S. Livingood Lectureship WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Steven R. Feldman, M.D., Ph.D., a dermatologist at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, recently delivered the Clarence S. Livingood Lectureship at the American Ac

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3/29/2006

WFUBMC Opens the First MEG Center in North Carolina and Surrounding States WFUBMC Opens the First MEG Center in North Carolina and Surrounding States WINSTON-SALEM - Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center recently opened the state's first and only Magnetoencephalography (MEG) Imaging Center offeri

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3/28/2006

Small Study Points to Addictive Effects of Frequent Tanning Small Study Points to Addictive Effects of Frequent Tanning WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Frequent users of tanning beds may be getting more out of the experience than darker skin, according to researchers from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Cen

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3/27/2006

Imaging Technology Helps Identify Esophageal Cancer Patients Who Respond Well to Treatment Imaging Technology Helps Identify Esophageal Cancer Patients Who Respond Well to Treatment WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - New research at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center shows that Positron Emission Tomography

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3/23/2006

Downtown Health Plaza of Baptist Hospital Receives American College of Radiology Accreditation Downtown Health Plaza of Baptist Hospital Receives American College of Radiology Accreditation WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - The Downtown Health Plaza of Baptist Hospital has been awarded a three-year term of accredita

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3/20/2006

Goal of Asthma Studies is to Find More Effective Treatments Goal of Asthma Studies is to Find More Effective Treatments WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - From studying new injected medications to learning about the effects of patients' genes, researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and colleague

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3/17/2006

Drug Helps Cognitive Function, Mood, Quality of Life in Brain Tumor Patients following Radiation Therapy Drug Helps Cognitive Function, Mood, Quality of Life in Brain Tumor Patients following Radiation Therapy WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - A drug that is marketed to treat Alzheimer's disease also improves cogn

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3/17/2006

Women with Breast Cancer Who Choose Preventive Mastectomies Generally Satisfied, Study Shows Women with Breast Cancer Who Choose Preventive Mastectomies Generally Satisfied, Study Shows WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Most women with cancer in one breast who decide to have the unaffected breast removed along with

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3/16/2006

Research Mice Help Scientists Understand the Complexities of Cholesterol Research Mice Help Scientists Understand the Complexities of Cholesterol WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues have developed new research mice to help them better understand ho

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3/15/2006

GOV. EASLEY DECLARES MARCH 12-18 SEVERE WEATHER AWARENESS WEEK GOV. EASLEY DECLARES MARCH 12-18 SEVERE WEATHER AWARENESS WEEK Tornado Drills in Schools and Government Buildings to be Held March 15 RALEIGH - Gov. Mike Easley has declared March 12-18 as Severe Weather Awareness Week in North Carolina and desi

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3/13/2006

WFUBMC Receives Five Awards from World Wide Web WFUBMC Receives Five Awards from World Wide Web WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has received five awards through the Fall/Winter 2005 World Wide Web Health Awards. This semiannual program recognizes the best health info

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3/10/2006

Double Transplants May Offer One Solution to Short Supply of Donated Kidneys Double Transplants May Offer One Solution to Short Supply of Donated Kidneys WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Transplanting a pair of kidneys with limited function into one patient can be just as successful as the standard procedure in whi

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3/8/2006

Effect of Diabetes on Heart May Differ By Ethnicity, Study Finds Effect of Diabetes on Heart May Differ By Ethnicity, Study Finds WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Diabetes strongly increases the risk of heart failure in all ethnic groups, but early effects of diabetes on the heart may differ depending on whether

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3/7/2006

Mini-fellowship Program Attracts High School Students into Science Careers Mini-fellowship Program Attracts High School Students into Science Careers WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Nearly all the high school students who participate in a summer mini-fellowship-in-research program at Wake Forest University Sch

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3/6/2006

Blumstein Elected Officer of National Organization Blumstein Elected Officer of National Organization WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Howard Blumstein, M.D., medical director of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, has been elected secretary/treasurer of the Americ

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3/2/2006

"Brain Awareness Week" Events Scheduled in Winston-Salem "Brain Awareness Week" Events Scheduled in Winston-Salem WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Nationally recognized experts on brain function, cognitive impairment, neuroscience, and music will take part in Winston-Salem's celebration of Brain Awareness Week 2006

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3/2/2006

Three Surgeons Join Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center Three Surgeons Join Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -- The Department of General Surgery at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has announced the appointment of three surgeons to its faculty.

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2/28/2006

Folk Remedies Widely Used by Older Adults in North Carolina Folk Remedies Widely Used by Older Adults in North Carolina WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - A survey of older adults in rural North Carolina shows that they widely use complementary medicine therapies, but tend to focus on folk or home remedies, such as t

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2/27/2006

Researchers Say Criterion for Diagnosing Child Abuse Not Always Accurate Researchers Say Criterion for Diagnosing Child Abuse Not Always Accurate WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - When it comes to looking for damage to the eyes to prove child abuse, new research shows that things aren't always as they seem, accordin

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2/23/2006

Brenner Researcher Says PSA Campaign About Risky Sexual Behaviors A Success Brenner Researcher Says PSA Campaign About Risky Sexual Behaviors A Success WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -Media campaigns that remind parents to talk with their children about sex are effective, according to a pediatric researcher at Bren

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2/23/2006

Policy Changes in Poultry Industry Could Reduce Worker Injuries, Report Suggests Policy Changes in Poultry Industry Could Reduce Worker Injuries, Report Suggests WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - A survey of Hispanic poultry workers in western North Carolina suggests that policy changes - such as encouraging job rot

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2/22/2006

Davie County Commissioners Revise Agreement With Davie County Hospital Davie County Commissioners Revise Agreement With Davie County Hospital WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Davie County Commissioners have voted to revise the agreement with Davie County Emergency Health Corporation (parent organization of Davie Co

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2/22/2006

Researcher to Speak about Dietary Supplements and Disease Prevention in Children Researcher to Speak about Dietary Supplements and Disease Prevention in Children WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Linda Linday, M.D., a researcher who focuses on the role of certain dietary supplements in preventing childhood obesity a

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2/20/2006

Graduate Students at School of Medicine to Study Ethics Graduate Students at School of Medicine to Study Ethics WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - The faked work of the Korean stem cell scientists, the shading of the truth in laboratory analyses that make results seem better than they are or withholding data that

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2/15/2006

WFUBMC Surgeon Named President-Elect of the Southern Association for Vascular Surgery WFUBMC Surgeon Named President-Elect of the Southern Association for Vascular Surgery WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Kimberley J. Hansen, M.D., professor of surgery and head of the section on vascular surgery at Wake Forest Uni

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2/14/2006

$10 Million NIH Grant to Identify Genes That Might Contribute to Early Atherosclerosis $10 Million NIH Grant to Identify Genes That Might Contribute to Early Atherosclerosis WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center cardiologist David M. Herrington, M.D., M.H.S., is leading a $1

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2/13/2006

Counseling Children about Skin Cancer Important, But Rarely Done Counseling Children about Skin Cancer Important, But Rarely Done WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - More pediatricians should counsel children and their parents about preventing skin cancer, according to dermatology researchers from Wake Forest Universi

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2/13/2006

Electroconvulsive Therapy Improves Quality of Life for At Least Six Months Electroconvulsive Therapy Improves Quality of Life for At Least Six Months WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) - shock treatment -improves quality of life in patients with major depression, and that improved qu

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2/10/2006

Brenner Children's Hospital Pediatrician Awarded Grant Brenner Children's Hospital Pediatrician Awarded Grant WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Shari Barkin, M.D., a pediatrician at Brenner Children's Hospital, has been awarded a grant from the Duke Endowment to develop the Collaborative to Strengthen Families a

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2/9/2006

Air Ambulance Research Identifies Best Intubation Method Air Ambulance Research Identifies Best Intubation Method WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Research has identified the most effective way to insert breathing tubes in air ambulance patients on the way to the hospital. The finding, that a combination of sedativ

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2/8/2006

Celtic Music Group Gaelwynd to Perform Celtic Music Group Gaelwynd to Perform WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Celtic music group Gaelwynd will perform on the eve of St. Patrick's Day Thursday, March 16 at 12:15 p.m. in Davis Memorial Chapel at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Admission is free.

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2/8/2006

National Study Aimed at Improving Alzheimer's Diagnosis and Treatment Begins at WFUBMC National Study Aimed at Improving Alzheimer's Diagnosis and Treatment Begins at WFUBMC WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is one of 60 centers in the United States and Canada selected t

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2/8/2006

Wake Forest University Eye Center and Coliseum Eye Associates Enter Partnership Wake Forest University Eye Center and Coliseum Eye Associates Enter Partnership WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - The Wake Forest University Eye Center of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and Coliseum Eye Associates are now

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2/7/2006

National Study Finds No Effect from Reducing Total Dietary Fat National Study Finds No Effect from Reducing Total Dietary Fat WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Despite findings being announced this week that a low-fat diet introduced in the middle-age years didn't reduce the risk of breast cancer, heart disease, str

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2/7/2006

Nearly Half of People Who Need Cholesterol Treatment Don't Get It Nearly Half of People Who Need Cholesterol Treatment Don't Get It WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Even though treatment for cholesterol disorders can reduce the risk of heart and blood vessel disease by about 30 percent over five years, many at-risk

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2/6/2006

Some Masks Used in Children's Asthma Treatment Not Effective, Research Shows Some Masks Used in Children's Asthma Treatment Not Effective, Research Shows WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Some face masks commonly used to help young children inhale asthma medicine are not effective, according to a new study by resea

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2/3/2006

Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Partners Medicare Choice Sign Contract Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Partners Medicare Choice Sign Contract WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Almost 40,000 senior citizens who are members of Partners Medicare Choice now have in-network access to Wake Fo

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2/2/2006

Researchers to Help Depressed Patients Get Much-Needed Sleep Researchers to Help Depressed Patients Get Much-Needed Sleep WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center are looking at ways to help depressed people sleep easier. Psychiatric researchers will be studying

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2/1/2006

Lung Cancer Survival Rates May Be Linked to Access to Care Lung Cancer Survival Rates May Be Linked to Access to Care WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - New research suggests that the lower survival rates of blacks with lung cancer may be explained by access to care. The study, by Wake Forest University Baptist Medic

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2/1/2006

Obesity May be Factor In Accelerated Type I Diabetes In Some Patients Obesity May be Factor In Accelerated Type I Diabetes In Some Patients WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Obesity, long known as a cause of type II diabetes, may accelerate the onset of type 1 diabetes in some - but not all - groups of younger patie

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1/30/2006

Trauma Centers Have Lower Mortality Rates, Research Shows Trauma Centers Have Lower Mortality Rates, Research Shows WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - A national study that included six hospitals in North Carolina has found that the overall risk of death is 25 percent lower when care for traumatic injuries is provided at

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1/30/2006

WFUBMC Gastroenterologist Wins Medical Research Award WFUBMC Gastroenterologist Wins Medical Research Award WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Girish Mishra, M.D., M.S., associate professor of internal medicine, section on gastroenterology at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, was recently awarded the Res

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1/26/2006

Medical School Reorganizes Public Health Sciences, Creating a Division and Three Departments Medical School Reorganizes Public Health Sciences, Creating a Division and Three Departments WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - The Department of Public Health Sciences - the national leader in research funding from the N

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1/24/2006

Free Health Fair is Saturday at Marketplace Mall Free Health Fair is Saturday at Marketplace Mall WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Free health screenings for glaucoma and high blood pressure and free tests for cholesterol and blood sugar will be available this Saturday (Jan. 28) at Marketplace Mall from 10 a.m. to

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1/23/2006

Metabolic Syndrome Identified As Risk Factor for Kidney-Pancreas Transplant Patients Metabolic Syndrome Identified As Risk Factor for Kidney-Pancreas Transplant Patients WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - A three-year multi-center study of kidney-pancreas transplant recipients has identified a new risk factor for imp

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1/23/2006

Researchers to Study Exercise as Prevention for Breast Cancer Researchers to Study Exercise as Prevention for Breast Cancer WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Researchers from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center are teaming up with physical therapy students from Winston-Salem State University to study how

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1/21/2006

Researchers Isolate Causes of Cognitive Loss Following Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery Researchers Isolate Causes of Cognitive Loss Following Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Minimizing trauma to the body's largest artery - the aorta - during heart bypass surgery can significantly redu

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1/20/2006

Maya Angelou Research Center Receives $12,000 Grant Maya Angelou Research Center Receives $12,000 Grant WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - The Maya Angelou Research Center on Minority Health at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has received a $12,000 grant from Johnson & Johnson and the Society for

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1/17/2006

Soy Phytoestrogens May Block Estrogen Effects in Some Postmenopausal Women, Animal Research Suggests Soy Phytoestrogens May Block Estrogen Effects in Some Postmenopausal Women, Animal Research Suggests WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Research in monkeys suggests that the natural plant estrogens found in soy do n

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1/13/2006

Medicine Woman to Speak in Triad Medicine Woman to Speak in Triad WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Rosalyn L. Bruyere, a healer, clairvoyant and medicine woman who regularly teaches and participates in research, will speak at several locations in Winston-Salem on Jan. 23-26. The events are sponsored by the

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1/12/2006

The National Institutes of Health Renews Multi-million Dollar Grant to Study Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome at WFUBMC The National Institutes of Health Renews Multi-million Dollar Grant to Study Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome at WFUBMC WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

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1/11/2006

New Race to Support Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program New Race to Support Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - The Heart Center at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has created a new event to raise money for the Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Pro

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1/9/2006

Collaboration Established Between WFUHS & Tengion to Advance Regenerative Medicine Research Collaboration Established Between WFUHS & Tengion to Advance Regenerative Medicine Research WINSTON-SALEM, N.C., AND KING OF PRUSSIA, PA.,-- Wake Forest University Health Sciences and Tengion Inc. announ

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1/9/2006

Seed Stage Associates Expands To Assist 11 UNC Campuses Seed Stage Associates Expands To Assist 11 UNC Campuses WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Seed Stage Associates LLC, a wholly owned for-profit subsidiary of Wake Forest University Health Sciences (WFUHS), has won an expanded contract from the University of No

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1/5/2006

International Research Reveals Proven Ways to Reduce Drug Costs International Research Reveals Proven Ways to Reduce Drug Costs WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - A study of drug costs around the world revealed proven methods that could be used to reduce costs in the United States, according to a researcher from Wake

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1/4/2006

Wagner Named Deputy Associate Dean for Research Wagner Named Deputy Associate Dean for Research WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Janice D. Wagner, D.V.M., Ph.D., has been appointed deputy associate dean for research at Wake Forest University School of Medicine by William B. Applegate, M.D., M.P.H., dean and senior

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1/3/2006

Nurse Anesthesia Program Receives Maximum Accreditation Nurse Anesthesia Program Receives Maximum Accreditation WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - The Nurse Anesthesia program at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center was awarded a 10-year accreditation by the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educa

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