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12/31/2007
Researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine have shown that the effects of sleep deprivation on cognitive performance can be reversed when the naturally occurring brain peptide, orexin-A, is administered in monkeys. Their results are published in this week’s Journal of Neuroscience.

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12/31/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is one of three medical centers in the state to receive grant money to help continue its effort to offer healthy food and beverage options throughout the hospital.

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12/31/2007
Strokes strike about 700,000 people each year. Knowing your risk factors could prevent you from becoming a statistic. The Comprehensive Stroke Center at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is offering free stroke screenings during January to help kick off the new year on a healthy note. Our experts in stroke care and rehabilitation from our nationally-recognized stroke center will be on hand to answer your questions. The screenings are free and open to those over 40 years of age.

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12/21/2007
Sally Shumaker, Ph.D., professor and associate dean for research, has been appointed to senior associate dean for research of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. David Friedman, Ph.D., professor of physiology and pharmacology, was also appointed to associate dean for research.

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12/21/2007
A hospital cafeteria might not be the first place to come to mind when planning where to eat your holiday meal, but guest chef David Koerner would like the chance to delight your taste buds.

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12/19/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has received the designation of “Three Stars and Higher Efficiency” as a UnitedHealth Premium Cardiac – Cardiac Surgery Specialty Center for 2007.

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12/18/2007
Kimberley J. Hansen, M.D., professor of surgery and head of the section on vascular and endovascular surgery at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, has been named president of the Southern Association for Vascular Surgery (SAVS).

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12/18/2007
The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has funded a three-year clinical and research training program in vascular medicine at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

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12/17/2007
The first new tenants of the much anticipated Piedmont Triad Research Park (PTRP) Wet Lab LaunchPad project were announced today (Dec. 17) during a grand opening event at 3 p.m.

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12/13/2007
The 2007 update of the Best Doctors in America® database includes 181 physicians at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. The Medical Center also ranks 32nd in the nation for the number of physicians listed in Castle Connolly’s new 7th edition of America’s Top Doctors®.

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12/13/2007
A study by Heart Center cardiologists at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center indicates that drug-coated stents are more beneficial than harmful in keeping the arteries of chest pain patients clear of blood clots.

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12/12/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has been named a Center of Excellence in Geriatric Medicine and Training by the John A. Hartford Foundation. Wake Forest Baptist was one of the three centers recently selected from a field of 27 applicants for the $450,000 grants.

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12/11/2007
Results from two genome-wide association studies have identified a genetic variant of the DAB2IP gene that is associated with the risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Research teams from the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), Wake Forest University School of Medicine, the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, and Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions made the discovery jointly.

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12/11/2007
If companies provide workplace flexibility and if employees perceive that flexibility as real, then healthier lifestyle habits are put into action by those employees, according to new research by lead author Joseph G. Grzywacz, Ph.D., of Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

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12/7/2007
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – Raymond C. Roy, M.D., Ph.D., has been appointed interim president of Wake Forest University Physicians (WFUP), a position that was created in the overall restructuring of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center earlier this year. With the approval of the Medical Center board of directors, Roy was appointed by William B. Applegate, M.D., interim president of Wake Forest University Health Sciences. Under the new Medical Center structure, the WFUP president will eventually report to the Medical Center CEO, another new position created in the restructuring, as will the presidents of Wake Forest Health Sciences and North Carolina Baptist Hospital. A nationwide search is currently under way by the Medical Center board for the new CEO.

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12/5/2007
New research at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center suggests that transplanting kidneys from donors who died after cardiac arrest – which used to be considered taboo – offers a promising approach to increase the donor pool.

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11/30/2007
Scientists have known which genes are linked to inflammation, but now researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center have organized this information to develop a powerful tool to aid investigators in studying the genetics of inflammatory diseases.

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11/30/2007
Two Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center employees are among 40 distinguished East Carolina University (ECU) College of Allied Health Sciences alumni who were recently recognized by the university.

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11/28/2007
Bryant Cameron Webb, a second year student at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, is the recipient of the 2007 National Association of Medical Minority Educators Inc. (NAMME) scholarship award.

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11/27/2007
A research team from Wake Forest University School of Medicine is the first to show that injections of a protein normally found in human cells can increase lifespan and delay the onset of symptoms in mice with ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), or Lou Gehrig’s disease.

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11/16/2007
Doug Edgeton has been selected as the new president of Piedmont Triad Research Park (PTRP). PTRP has secured grants totaling about $33 million for infrastructure improvements, including relocating railway lines, placing power lines underground, communications, storm water management, creek restoration, and new roadways.

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11/15/2007
A Wake Forest University School of Medicine student has received the Best Poster Presentation Award from the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP).

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11/14/2007
North Carolina Baptist Hospital/ Davie County Hospital has selected a site for the urgent and primary care center in Mocksville. The site is the southwest corner of the intersection of Route 601 and Country Lane. “This property will be easily accessible for patients and employees of businesses in the Mocksville area,” said Donny Lambeth, Interim President of Baptist Hospital. There is a traffic signal at the intersection.

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11/14/2007
Because of the 5,201 Forsyth County residents who participated in a long-running study of cardiovascular health factors, researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and colleagues have made major findings that have led to changes in health care policy at the national level.

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11/13/2007
New research from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center suggests that age alone shouldn’t be a barrier to receiving a kidney transplant – and that using donated kidneys that would once have been discarded may help alleviate the burgeoning organ shortage among older adults.

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11/13/2007
Rowan Regional Medical Center has partnered with Brenner Children’s Hospital at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center to utilize their Neonatal Critical Care Transport Team to optimize care for newborns and their families in Rowan County.

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11/12/2007
New research provides clues about the causes of lupus symptoms and suggests specific new targeted treatment strategies, according to Nilamadham Mishra, M.D., from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, in presentations this week at the American College of Rheumatology in Boston.

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11/9/2007
Studies in mice suggest that two drugs already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration show promise for treating the complications of lupus, according to Nilamadham Mishra, M.D., in presentations this week at the American College of Rheumatology in Boston. Mishra, a rheumatologist at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, had previously reported that an anti-seizure medication and a chemotherapy drug were effective at preventing skin and kidney disease in mice with lupus. In the current research, he explored why the drugs were effective – with the goal of understanding more about what goes wrong to cause the disease.

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11/7/2007
Despite previous research suggesting that older adults are more distractible, new research shows they are no more distractible than younger adults when asked to focus their attention on their sense of sight or sound, or when asked to switch their attention from one sense to the other.

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11/7/2007
“Abscess Incision and Drainage, A Procedure in Clinical Medicine,” a teaching video produced by Wake Forest University School of Medicine, is featured in the Nov. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) and will become a part of its on-line educational series. The manuscript and 10-minute video created by lead author Michael T. Fitch, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues from the Department of Emergency Medicine, detail the basic physician procedure for abscess incision and drainage. This procedure is used to treat many common skin and soft tissue infections, including abscesses caused by antibiotic-resistant organisms such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

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11/7/2007
New research comparing music conductors and non-musicians shows that both the conductors and the non-musicians “tuned out” their visual sense while performing a difficult hearing task. As the task became harder, however, only the non-musicians tuned out more of their visual sense, indicating that the training and experience of the conductors changed how their brains work.

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11/5/2007
College students who drink alcohol mixed with so-called “energy” drinks are at dramatically higher risk for injury and other alcohol-related consequences, compared to students who drink alcohol without energy drinks, according to new research from Wake Forest University School of Medicine. The findings were reported today at the annual meeting of the American Public Health Association in Washington, D.C.

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11/5/2007
Three graduate students from Wake Forest University School of Medicine were finalists in the 2007 Collegiate Inventors Competition (CIC), a program of the National Inventors Hall of Fame Foundation. The students created a life-like lung that can be used in motor vehicle crash tests.

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11/5/2007
Brenner Children’s Hospital is opening the region’s first and most comprehensive pediatric obesity program. Called Brenner FIT (Families in Training), the program has several components, including a year-long intensive treatment program for overweight children with an underlying medical problem.

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11/4/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center physicians are part of a statewide study on the treatment of chest pain patients that has standardized care and reduced the time it takes to unblock the coronary artery of a person having a heart attack.

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11/2/2007
More than 5,000 people living in North Carolina and approximately 213,380 people in the United States will be diagnosed with lung cancer this year. Today, patients and their families have more choices about how to manage and treat lung cancer, but coping with the diagnosis and making decisions can be overwhelming

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11/2/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has launched its search for a chief executive officer for the Medical Center. A 10-member committee has been formed to conduct the search, brought about by the decision to restructure the Medical Center, the largest employer in the Piedmont Triad with more than 11,000 employees. An integrated organizational structure was announced in March with one CEO for the entire Medical Center.

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11/2/2007
What started as a local effort by medical students to provide free health care to the community could lead to similar projects at medical schools across the country. In January 2007, the annual “Share the Health” Fair was held at Marketplace Mall by Wake Forest University School of Medicine (WFUSM) students. The co-chairs of the event, Blair Simpson and Lindsay Chaney, will present the results of the project at the Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American Public Health Association (APHA) being held Nov. 3-7 in Washington, D.C.

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11/1/2007
The holidays are an exciting time of year for kids, but kids and adults can often be tempted to overindulge. To ensure children have a healthy holiday, Brenner Children’s Hospital offers the following tips:

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10/29/2007
Mrs. Pumpkin’s Bakery and Deli is sponsoring a gingerbread house event on Saturday, Nov. 17 from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. to benefit the HIV Family Fund at Brenner Children’s Hospital. Children can make gingerbread houses, enjoy refreshments, holiday music and Santa, while celebrating the holidays and helping children living with HIV. Reservations are required by calling 336-924-9797. Mrs. Pumpkins Bakery and Deli is located on 3645-B Reynolda Road in Winston-Salem.

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10/29/2007
Griffith D. Parks, Ph.D., has been appointed chairman of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, by William B. Applegate, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.P., dean and interim president of Wake Forest University Health Sciences.

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10/26/2007
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C -- Halloween is supposed to be a spooky night, but parents don’t have to be scared about their kids’ safety if they follow some simple safety tips from Safe Kids Forsyth County. With Halloween being one of the most dangerous days of the year for child pedestrians -- children are more than twice as likely to be hit by a car and killed on Halloween than the rest of the year -- it’s essential for parents to prepare their children properly to stay safe while trick or treating.

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10/26/2007
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – Burton V. Reifler, M.D., M.P.H., a professor of psychiatry at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and senior advisor to the dean, has been elected president of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) for the year 2008. The ABPN, one of 24 member boards of the American Board of Medical Specialties, maintains the certification process for physicians in psychiatry, neurology and 11 subspecialties. Reifler will head the ABPN’s board of directors, which works with the APBN staff and committees of specialist and subspecialist physicians, to develop certification and maintenance examinations, identify core competencies, and promote advancements related to the fields of psychiatry and neurology.

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10/24/2007
Research at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is leading to potentially lifesaving changes for patients suffering from dysphagia, or swallowing difficulty. Dysphagia is common among critical care patients and can lead to malnutrition, aspiration of food or liquids into the trachea, and pneumonia.

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10/23/2007
A gene discovered by scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine has been linked to lupus and related autoimmune diseases. The finding, reported online in Nature Genetics, is the latest in a series of revelations that shed new light on what goes wrong in human cells to cause the diseases. “This research is a huge leap toward understanding the cause of lupus and related autoimmune diseases,” said Fred Perrino, Ph.D., a co-author on the paper and a professor of biochemistry at Wake Forest. “There had been few clues before now.” Perrino, who discovered the gene in 1998, said he suspected it was involved in human disease, but it took a group of researchers from around the world collaborating to put the puzzle together.

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10/23/2007
The results of the first study to show the effectiveness of early physical therapy in a medical intensive care unit (ICU) are being presented today (Oct. 23) by a researcher from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center at the national meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians in Chicago. The length of stay for a group of respiratory-failure patients who received mobility therapy within 48 hours of the insertion of a breathing tube was reduced by an average of three days compared to the stay for patients who did not receive the therapy. This reduced length of stay included a reduction of time in the ICU of more than a day. Initial therapy – called passive range of motion – was provided by nursing assistants who flexed the joints of the patients’ upper and lower limbs three times a day, seven days a week. As patients progressed, they received more advanced physical therapy from a physical therapist. The therapy proved safe, and there was also no addition to h

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10/23/2007
Catch the holiday spirit and kick off the season with the sights and sounds of the 20th annual Festival of Trees, featuring shopping, entertainment, activities for children and the chance to view the Christmas tree forest. The event, held at the Education Building on the Dixie Classic Fairgrounds, is open from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 17, and from noon until 5 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 18. Admission to the Festival of Trees is $6 for adults and $4 for children 12 and under. Parking is free. All proceeds from the Festival of Trees support pediatric programs at Brenner Children’s Hospital, part of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

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10/19/2007
A research team from Wake Forest University School of Medicine, the Northern California Cancer Center, and the University of Southern California has found that increased exposure to sunlight – which increases levels of vitamin D in the body -- may decrease the risk of advanced breast cancer.

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10/17/2007
Researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center are evaluating whether encouraging healthy lifestyle changes to prevent diabetes is more effective through a group counseling setting, or through an individual education program. This two-year study, called the Healthy Living Partnership to Prevent Diabetes, or HELP Prevent Diabetes, is currently recruiting volunteers in Forsyth County. Participants will be placed in one of two study groups. The first approach will involve weekly group meetings led by a trained community health worker who will give information about weight loss, physical activity and nutrition. The second group will receive individualized counseling from a registered dietician.

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10/16/2007
On Tuesday, Oct. 16, a special event to honor patients’ courage, strength and hope will be held at the WFUBMC Comprehensive Cancer Center from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the second floor. This FREE event will feature a NASCAR theme and special visitor, driver Cale Gale, who will be there from 10 a.m. to noon. Patients are encouraged to participate in the Just For You event, a day of pampering with refreshments, makeovers, massages, manicures, hair cuts and styling. Live music will be provided throughout the day and includes the choral group Sugar Stiks, Mary Simmons, a floutist, as well as Chuck Harmon, a hammer dulcimer player, and Danny Crouse, providing Top 40 tunes. Families, children and caregivers are welcome, too.

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10/15/2007
A small capsule that takes “snapshots” of the small intestine as it moves through the digestive tract helped doctors spot cases of Crohn’s disease that had gone undiagnosed for up to 15 years, according to researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Reporting this week at the American College of Gastroenterology’s meeting in Philadelphia, the researchers said that of 198 video capsule endoscopies that were performed to evaluate unexplained gastrointestinal bleeding, physicians found six cases of Crohn’s disease that hadn’t been diagnosed previously, despite the patients having colonoscopies and a variety of other imaging tests. The study is the first to evaluate the prevalence of the Crohn’s disease (about 3 percent) among patients having capsule endoscopy to evaluate unexplained bleeding.

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10/15/2007
The first research to show the involvement of a gene known as Dmp1 in human lung cancer will hopefully lead to an increased understanding on what goes wrong at the cellular level to cause the disease, according to researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine reporting in Cancer Cell. The research team found that the Dmp1 gene – which normally works to suppress tumor formation – is non-functional in about 35 percent of human lung cancers. “Lung cancer is one of the most lethal types of cancer and understanding more about its cause could be a first step to developing new treatments,” said senior scientist Kazushi Inoue, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor of pathology.

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10/15/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center announced today that it has submitted a Certificate of Need (CON) application to add 26 beds to existing units. The 2007 State Medical Facilities Plan reflects a need for 26 additional beds in Forsyth County. Wake Forest Baptist currently has 872 licensed beds, of which 789 are general acute care. “An aging population, an increase in chronic illnesses, and population growth will continue to drive up the demand for inpatient care in general,” said Mike Freeman, vice president of strategic planning, explaining why the additional beds are needed. From 2003-2007 NCBH has experienced significant growth in inpatient admissions. It is anticipated that the addition of two surgeons who perform joint replacements will increase the volume of these surgeries. “At present, the medical and surgical oncology units are effectively operating at full capacity and we must position ourselves to respond to these increasing demands by acquiring additiona

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10/12/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is being honored by the N.C. Community College System for its support of Forsyth Technical Community College. The Distinguished Partners of Excellence Award recognizes a company, business or industry group and its community college partner whose joint efforts have resulted in significant benefits to the professional development of its employees, or individuals pursuing job training/retraining for future employment. Wake Forest Baptist shares in the award with Forsyth Medical Center (FMC) and FTCC, which nominated the partnership. This partnership is being recognized because of its support of the Bob Greene Hall, the college's classroom and laboratory building for allied health programs. Wake Forest Baptist and FMC have also assisted with faculty and professional development, as well as equipment for the college's health programs. Also, both hospitals have representatives who serve on the advisory boards for the college's health

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10/10/2007
The Department of Urology of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has moved its patient care offices to 140 Charlois Blvd. in Winston-Salem.

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10/10/2007

Anthony Atala, M.D., director of the Institute for Regenerative Medicine at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, will present a lecture from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. on Friday Oct. 19 on the science of growing new tissues and organs in the laboratory. The talk, in Babcock Auditorium on the Medical Center campus, is free and open to the public. Atala will speak on “Regenerative Medicine: New Approaches in Healthcare for the 21st Century,” as part of the opening session of Alumni Weekend, an event in which about 400 graduates of the Wake Forest University School of Medicine will return to campus for reunions. Atala’s current work focuses on growing new human cells, tissues and organs (including kidney, blood vessels, cartilage, muscle, bladder, pancreas, and others) to repair or replace tissues or organs damaged by age, cancer, trauma, or abnormal development. In addition to his research in regenerative medicine, Atala is the W.H. Boyce Professor and chairman of the Depa

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10/9/2007
The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center announces the appointment of Jason E. Lang, M.D., as assistant professor, orthopaedic surgery. Lang will join orthopaedic surgeons Riyaz H. Jinnah, M.D., FRCS; William G. Ward Sr., M.D.; Gary G. Poehling, M.D.; David F. Martin, M.D.; and Scott C. Wilson, M.D., as part of the most comprehensive joint program in the Triad. Lang treats adult patients with pain, deformity and arthritis of the knee and hip, employing state-of-the-art techniques – mini-incisions, computers, bone sparing, and limited joint replacement – when possible. His areas of expertise include partial and total knee and hip replacement, computer-assisted total joint surgery, and revision surgery of the hips and knees. Lang has made presentations at national meetings and been published in national journals. He also co-wrote a chapter in Insall and Scott’s Surgery of the Knee.

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10/9/2007
K. Patrick Ober, M.D., professor of internal medicine and dean of medical education at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, has been nominated for the 2007 Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Humanism in Medicine Award. The recipient of the national 2007 Humanism in Medicine Award, presented by the AAMC through the support of the Pfizer Medical Humanities Initiative (PMHI), will be announced Nov. 3 in Washington, D.C. The AAMC annually recognizes a medical school faculty physician who illustrates the qualities of a caring and compassionate mentor. The goal of the award is to remind medical students and faculty of the importance of these qualities and the positive effects they can have on the doctor-patient relationship.

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10/9/2007
Halloween is an exciting time of year for kids, but kids and adults can often be tempted to overindulge. To ensure children have a healthy holiday, Brenner Children’s Hospital offers the following tips: “Halloween only comes once a year, but steering children in a positive direction and away from unhealthful patterns anytime of the year is always good,” said Stacy Kolbash, a registered dietitian with Brenner Children’s Hospital. “For healthier treat options think ‘mini’.” Kolbash recommends: • Mini bags of microwavable popcorn • Mini bags of pretzels • Mini bags of peanuts • Small box of dried fruit • Mini bag of baby carrots • Pack of sugar free gum “If you simply cannot celebrate the holiday without chocolate, be sure to make smarter choices,” Kolbash said. “For example, choose a mini dark chocolate bar with nuts that offers an antioxidant boost. But remember, your treat does not have to be edible. Research shows that children will choose a toy as often as they

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10/9/2007
The Board of Commissioners of the Town of Mocksville unanimously adopted a resolution of support for the Certificate of Need proposed by Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center for a replacement hospital for Davie County. The resolution states that the “need clearly exists for a modern hospital with state-of-the-art equipment and a broad range of services” to meet the healthcare needs of Davie County, one of the fastest-growing counties in North Carolina. The resolution points out that the Davie County Hospital is “an outdated facility that cannot feasibly be renovated and has no adjoining land for expansion.” The hospital was built in 1956.

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10/8/2007
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – New research shows that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a group of drugs commonly used to treat depression, may double the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, according to researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues. When the drugs are taken with aspirin and other similar pain medications, the risk is more than 600 percent higher. “Clinicians who prescribe these medications should be aware of the potential risk and may need to consider alternatives,” said Sonal Singh, M.D., senior researcher and an assistant professor of internal medicine. “In addition, regulatory authorities should consider revising existing package inserts to highlight the magnitude of the risk.” The research was reported online this month in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. Emerging evidence has shown that SSRIs may be associated with bleeding of the lining of the digestive tract including the esophagus, stomach or upper par

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10/8/2007
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – A nationwide study examining the safety of Tasers® used by law enforcement agencies suggests the devices are safe, causing a low occurrence of serious injuries. “This study is the first large, independent study of injuries associated with Tasers. It is the first injury epidemiology study to review every Taser deployment and to reliably assess the overall risk and severity of injuries in real world conditions,” said William Bozeman, M.D., the lead investigator and an emergency medicine specialist at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. “The injury rate is low and most injuries appear to be minor. These results support the safety of the devices.” Bozeman will present the study results at the American College of Emergency Physicians’ Research Forum in Seattle, Wash., Oct. 8. In a review of nearly 1,000 cases, 99.7 per cent of those subjected to a Taser had mild injuries, such as scrapes and bruises, or none at all. Only three subjects (0.3%) su

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10/5/2007
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – Gail Marion, P.A., Ph.D., can now add screenwriter and film producer to her resume. The final touches to the educational film “Tobacco Ties,” have been done and it’s been unveiled to medical students. The 9-minute film depicts a typical scenario: a single, working mother of two consults her doctor because of asthma-related problems. She’s a smoker who comes from a family of smokers who have farmed tobacco for several generations. Sunday dinners at home always end with her and her sisters sitting around the table gabbing, drinking coffee and smoking. She knows smoking isn’t healthy and is aggravating her asthma, but it helps her de-stress and concentrate at work. Most importantly, it defines her role within her family which is steeped in a history of tobacco. “In this scenario, the patient comes to her doctor with a culture of tobacco – it’s how they made their living, paid for schooling, bought their houses,” said Marion.

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10/4/2007
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – During the week of Oct. 6-12, physician assistants (PAs) around the United States, including the PA students of the Wake Forest University Katherine Anderson Society (KAS), will celebrate National Physician Assistant Week. The first class of PAs graduated from Duke University in 1967. Physician assistants are licensed health professionals who practice medicine as members of a team with their supervising physicians. PAs deliver a broad range of medical and surgical services to diverse populations in rural and urban settings. As part of their comprehensive responsibilities, PAs conduct physical exams, diagnose and treat illnesses, order and interpret tests, counsel on preventive health care, prescribe medications, and assist in surgery. The KAS is the student society comprised of Wake Forest University Physician Assistant students. Community outreach activities planned for the current academic year include visiting local secondary schools to educate

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10/2/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center cardiothoracic surgeons will perform a mitral heart valve repair using Gortex Chords® and a Medtronic Simplici-T Band® live Tuesday, Oct. 23 at noon. Neal D. Kon, M.D., professor of cardiothoracic surgery at Wake Forest Baptist will perform the procedure. Edward H. Kincaid, M.D., assistant professor of cardiothoracic surgery will assist. A. Robert Cordell, M.D., professor of cardiothoracic surgery emeritus will narrate the procedure and answer questions from viewers. To view this live webcast, visit www.wfubmc.edu. The Webcast will also be archived at the Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center web site.

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10/2/2007
The new hospital proposed by Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center for Davie County will be one of the most technically advanced facilities in the United States. “Davie Hospital will incorporate a totally digital, electronic record system,” said Paul M. LoRusso, vice president and chief information officer at Wake Forest Baptist. “Fewer than 20 of the more than 5,700 hospitals in the country achieve a totally paperless environment.” “The benefits of a totally digital record system for patient care and quality are well documented.”

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10/1/2007
Several new studies suggest how transplant surgeons can make more effective use of kidneys from deceased donors – even those that are at the outer limits of acceptance criteria – according to researchers from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. At the 13th Congress of the European Society for Organ Transplantation held in Prague, Czech Republic, Rajinder Singh, M.D., a fellow in transplantation surgery, presented the results of three studies suggesting not only the potential to expand acceptance criteria, but specific ways to achieve optimum results. “Our experience suggests that the limits of donor acceptability may continue to expand as we are able to achieve acceptable short-term results with kidneys that once would have been discarded,” said Robert Stratta, M.D., senior researcher. “Our findings point to the importance of matching donor and recipient ages, reducing waiting times for transplantation, and taking steps to reduce delayed graft function and acute

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10/1/2007
All seminars and screenings are held at BestHealth in Hanes Mall unless otherwise noted and require preregistration unless otherwise indicated. To register for any of these seminars, please call Health On-Call® at 716-2255 or 1-800-446-2255. For a complete listing of seminars visit the website at www.besthealth.com.

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9/30/2007
The newest research building in Piedmont Triad Research Park has been named the Richard H. Dean Biomedical Research Building, in honor of the man whose vision for the park has resulted in plans for major long-range development.

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9/26/2007
Brenner Children’s Hospital officials announced today that they are joining a new nonprofit organization that will raise funds nationally to help member hospitals cope with dramatic increases in the health needs of children. “America’s children are facing increasing challenges to their health and well-being—challenges that include the growing numbers of uninsured kids, the steadily climbing statistics on childhood obesity and the staggering toll of preventable injuries,” said Lori Brown, administrator and vice president of Brenner Children’s Hospital. “Together for Kids has been formed to rally more resources to make America’s kids healthier and safer.” Together for Kids consists of 34 children’s hospitals and hospital systems, representing 53 individual facilities serving children in 47 U.S. cities. The network includes major university teaching hospitals, pediatric departments within hospitals, and children’s hospitals in communities of all sizes. The alliance also inclu

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9/25/2007
The Department of Dermatology at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center ranks 13th in the country out of 107 programs based on results from a study by the Dermatology Online Journal. The programs were ranked by five measures: publications in 2001 to 2004; NIH funding in 2004; Dermatology Foundation grants in 2001 to 2004; faculty lectures in 2004 delivered at national conferences; and the number of full-time faculty members who were on the editorial boards of the top three U.S. dermatology journals and the top four subspecialty journals. “This is quite a compliment to our program,” said Alan B. Fleischer Jr., M.D., Professor and Chairman of Dermatology. “Our publication and presentation numbers compare very favorably with many of the larger programs in the top 20, in spite of our smaller faculty.”

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9/24/2007
Forums to gather input from the community about plans for the proposed Davie County Hospital will be held October 11, 15 and 16.

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9/24/2007
New findings from researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and colleagues suggest why some people with kidney failure can develop a rare tightening and swelling of the skin and other organs, including the lungs and heart. Reporting in the October issue of the American Journal of Dermatopathology, the authors suggest a possible explanation for why some patients on kidney dialysis who are injected with a “contrast agent” during a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) develop nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). The U.S. Food and Drug Administration now requires a warning about the potential risk on the products’ labels. NSF leads to thickened, rough or hard skin usually on the arms, legs or trunk. In some cases, the limbs can become difficult or even impossible to move.

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9/22/2007
An octogenarian who began championing senior citizens long before he became one will speak at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center on Monday, Sept. 24. Dr. Elbert C. Cole, the 89-year-old founder of the Shepherd’s Centers of America who has spent the last 30 years motivating senior citizens to become active in the community, will speak to the Medical Center’s Ethics Committee members and other invited guests. The Shepherd’s Centers of America are a network of interfaith, community-based organizations that provide meaning and purpose for adults throughout their mature years. Cole founded the Shepherd's Centers in 1975 in Kansas City, Mo., where he was serving as senior minister of a large midtown church. There are now more than 75 member organizations in 21 states, including centers in Winston-Salem and Greensboro. While leading the Shepherd’s Centers effort, Cole also continued to care for his dementia-stricken wife – traveling around the nation with her by

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9/21/2007
A celebration of the 50th anniversary of Davis Memorial Chapel at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and the 60th anniversary of the founding of the Medical Center’s Division of Pastoral Care, will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 26, in the chapel.

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9/21/2007
Debra I. Diz, Ph.D., director of basic science research at the Hypertension and Vascular Research Center at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, has been named the 2007 Lewis K. Dahl Memorial Lecturer. The lecture will be presented on Friday, Sept. 28 at the American Heart Association’s 61st Annual Council for High Blood Pressure Research Conference 2007 in Tucson, Ariz. Professor Diz has joint appointments in surgical sciences, physiology and pharmacology and neurosciences at Wake Forest Baptist. Diz’s research has mapped several of the circuits and chemical substances in the brain involved in the control of blood pressure. Long-standing studies she is leading investigate brain, blood and kidney interactions in people with high blood pressure and during the aging process.

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9/19/2007
Ronny A. Bell, Ph.D., M.S., professor of public health sciences-epidemiology and prevention at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, has been named director of the Maya Angelou Research Center on Minority Health. “After a nationwide search which attracted a large number of talented candidates, I am pleased to announce that Dr Bell emerged as the leading candidate for the directorship of the Angelou Research Center and has accepted the position,” said William B. Applegate, M.D., dean, Wake Forest University School of Medicine and interim president, Wake Forest University Health Sciences. “He has been extraordinarily effective as acting director in the last year and has earned the deep trust of all of our faculty and staff. In addition, Dr. Bell is a noted national scholar.” Bell will further the research center’s mission of health disparities research, community outreach and minority faculty and student development at Wake Forest Baptist. “I am honored t

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9/18/2007
The Center for Reproductive Medicine at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center will host a complimentary fertility seminar, “IVF: Is It Right for You?” on Tuesday Oct. 9 at Childress Vineyards in Lexington. Registration and hors d’oeuvres begin at 6 p.m. The Wake Forest Baptist Center for Reproductive Medicine, which has locations in Winston-Salem, Greensboro and Hickory, recently reported a 75 percent pregnancy success rate. The reported national average is currently 48 percent. There will be an opportunity to privately ask the doctors questions at the end of the seminar. For more information about the event or the center, call (336) 716-6476, or to register online, visit www.wfuivf.com.

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9/17/2007
Faculty from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, University of North Carolina, Penn State, Howard University and West Virginia University will participate in the Southeastern Symposium on Breast Cancer Disparities on Saturday, October 20. The one-day symposium, sponsored by the Maya Angelou Research Center on Minority Health, the Komen Foundation and the Avon Foundation, will be held at the Marriott and Embassy Suites in downtown Winston-Salem. Areas of focus will include disparities in breast cancer incidence, genetic risk, diagnosis and treatment, and survivorship. The symposium is targeted primarily for practitioners and researchers, but the public also is invited to attend. Registration fee is $75 and includes a continental breakfast, lunch and dinner.

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9/17/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, through North Carolina Baptist Hospital and its co-applicant, the Davie County Emergency Health Corporation, today is submitting its official application to the state to build an 81-bed community hospital with a broad range of services to meet the needs of Davie County and the adjoining areas of Clemmons and Lewisville in Forsyth County and the southern portion of Yadkin County.

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9/13/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has completed the purchase of a 25-acre site in Hillsdale where it plans to build the replacement for Davie County Hospital. The land is on N.C. 801 north of the I-40 interchange in eastern Davie County.

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9/13/2007
The third annual Corvette Cruise-In, benefiting Brenner Children’s Hospital, will be held on Saturday, Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. at Comp Rehab Plaza at 131 Miller Street, Winston-Salem. The event is free and open to the public, however donations to the Brenner Children’s Hospital Cancer Support Program are encouraged. The cruise-in will feature more than 100 corvettes. Entertainers scheduled to perform include: Kris Ferris, Bryan "Songbear" Smith, G.T. Summerlin, Greg Phairas and Andrea Reese. A raffle for a new 350 crate engine donated by Flow GM Parts Center will also be held. The tickets are $5 each and will be available at the cruise-in. As the only children’s hospital in this region, Brenner Children’s Hospital offers a dedicated pediatric oncology program. The childhood cancer treatment team at Brenner Children’s Hospital includes pediatric oncologists, surgeons, radiation oncologists, pediatric oncology nurses, specially trained psychologists, social work

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9/13/2007
The Downtown Health Plaza of Baptist Hospital will sponsor a free screening for prostate cancer Thursday, Sept. 20 from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. and Saturday, Sept. 22 from 7 a.m. until 9 a.m. at 1200 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive. The American Cancer Society recommends a blood test for the prostate specific antigen (PSA) and a digital rectal exam (DRG) annually, beginning at age 50 for men who do not have any major medical problems and can be expected to live at least 10 more years. Men at high risk should begin testing at age 45. Those at high risk include African American men and men who have a close relative (father, brother, or son) who had prostate cancer before age 65. Men at even higher risk (because they have several close relatives with prostate cancer at an early age) could begin testing at age 40. Depending on the results of the first tests, they might not need more testing until age 45.

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9/12/2007
An analysis of four studies involving more than 14,000 patients found that long-term use of the diabetes drug rosiglitazone (Avandia®) increased the risk of heart attack by 42 percent and doubled the risk of heart failure, according to a new report from researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues. There was no effect on death from cardiovascular causes. The analysis, reported in the Sept. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, is one of the first to evaluate how long-term use of Avandia affects risk of heart attacks, heart failure and mortality. It involved studies that followed patients for at least a year. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently required that Avandia and another drug in the same class carry the agency’s toughest “black-box” warning because of an increased risk of heart failure. The agency is currently evaluating whether a warning about heart attack risk should also be included for Avandia. Earlier t

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9/10/2007
A new study shows the number of drug-therapy related deaths and injuries reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) nearly tripled between 1998 and 2005. A researcher at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues reviewed serious and fatal drug events reported in that eight-year period to the FDA by consumers, health professionals and drug manufacturers, and found that serious adverse drug events increased 2.6-fold, from about 35,000 to nearly 89,000, and adverse drug-related deaths increased 2.7-fold, from about 5,500 to more than 15,000. The study is reported in the Sept. 10 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. The FDA receives these reports of serious adverse drug events through its Adverse Event Reporting System. Better known to health professionals as “MedWatch,” this system has been in operation under the same database system since 1998, with consistent regulatory requirements for drug manufactu

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9/5/2007
Vaccinating children against the influenza virus will help prevent many outpatient visits and hospitalizations due to the flu, according to a recent study published in the September issue of Pediatrics by a pediatrician at Brenner Children’s Hospital, part of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. “Less than 45 children between 6 months and up to 5 years old, need to be vaccinated to prevent one outpatient visit,” said senior researcher Katherine Poehling, M.D., M.P.H. “Nationally if half of the U.S. children 6 months to 5 years of age were vaccinated, over 2000 hospitalizations and up to 650,000 outpatient visits due to the flu could be prevented.” The flu commonly causes fever and respiratory illness among children. Each year, many children miss school and other activities due to sickness from the flu. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all children between the ages of 6 months and 5 years receive the flu shot. Flu shots usually become availa

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8/31/2007
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – Richard H. Dean, M.D., president emeritus of Wake Forest University Health Sciences, has been appointed by Gov. Mike Easley to the N.C. Economic Development Board. He will serve through June 2009. The 37-member board oversees state economic development research and planning and makes policy recommendations to the secretary of commerce, the governor and the General Assembly. As a member of the Economic Development Board, Dean will be involved in developing the state’s comprehensive economic development plan, including recruitment strategies, incentives, prioritization and coordination of economic development investments, workforce development and collaboration with educational and research institutions. Dean was a driving force behind the plans to expand the Piedmont Triad Research Park in downtown Winston-Salem, a major economic development initiative for the region. Dean is currently chairman of the Winston-Salem Chamber of Commerce. He served as presid

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8/31/2007
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – G. Douglas Atkinson, associate dean and vice president of networks at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, has been named to the 2007-08 board of directors of the Piedmont Triad Partnership (PTP). The PTP board consists of 23 members representing county and municipal government and private sector companies in the Piedmont Triad. The PTP, one of seven regional economic development partnerships in North Carolina, is the economic development organization representing the 12-county Piedmont Triad region. The PTP is the lead organization for the U.S. Department of Labor-funded Workforce Innovations in Regional Economic Development (WIRED) initiative, which supports the development of an integrated regional economic development and workforce development strategy for the Piedmont Triad. The Piedmont Triad is the nation's 37th largest metro region with more than 1.5 million residents.

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8/27/2007
The 11th Annual Brenner Children’s Classic 5K Run, presented by LeBleu, will be held on Saturday, September 8. The LeBleu Open 5K begins at 8:30 a.m. at the Reynolda Business Center. The race follows a USA Track and Field-certified course through historic Graylyn Estates and Reynolda Gardens. The CommScope 5K Challenge offers a $2,000 prize to the American male and female runner breaking the current North Carolina state 5K record. The Womble Carlyle School Challenge offers $4,000 in cash prizes to local schools that collect the most cash in donations and registration fees for the event. The grand prize of $1,500 goes to the school registering or collecting the most money for Brenner. The Toys R Us Fun Run is a one-mile run for children of all ages. The boy and girl winner, ages 13 or younger, will receive a 26-inch all-terrain bike. The fun run begins at 8 a.m. in the Reynolda Business Center parking lot. After the 5K race there will be a picnic lunch and awards present

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8/27/2007
New findings that one in 20 North Carolina men who have sex with men (MSM) reported using crystal methamphetamine during the previous month suggests increased risk for spreading HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STD), according to researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues. The rate of methamphetamine use among 1,189 MSM was 30 times higher than levels reported in the general U.S. population over the same period. Methampehtamine, or “meth,” is a highly addictive stimulant that has been found to impair judgment, decrease inhibition, increase impulsivity and enhance sexual sensitivity – which can all increase the potential for transmitting HIV. The study’s authors found that participants who reported using methamphetamines were more likely to report inconsistent condom use during anal sex within the past three months, a history of STD infection, being HIV-positive and using medications designed to treat erectile dysfunction.

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8/22/2007
In the first study of its kind, researchers have discovered that in autistic individuals, connections between brain cells may be deficient within single regions, and not just between regions, as was previously believed. Tony Wilson, Ph.D., lead researcher and assistant professor of neurology at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, said he hopes this study will eventually lead to earlier diagnosis and more targeted medications for autism. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG) brain imaging technology to measure brain electrical activity, the researchers administered a test called the 40 hertz (cycles per second) auditory steady-state response test. The test measures electromagnetic wave cycles and indicates brain cell discharges at the 40 hertz frequency.

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8/17/2007
L. Andrew Koman, M.D. has been named Chair of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. He replaces Gary G. Poehling, M.D., who has stepped down as Chair but remains a professor of orthopaedic surgery. Koman, who has been on the faculty of Wake Forest University School of Medicine since 1981, is a professor of pediatrics, associate director for development and research for the division of surgical sciences, and director of the hand fellowship program. He received his medical degree from Duke University and completed an orthopaedic residency and a fellowship in hand and microsurgery at Duke. He was on the Duke faculty prior to joining Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Koman has received more than $3 million in grants and awards. He has been the recipient of the Kappa Delta Award from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery for his work on microcirculation and the Heune Award from the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society in r

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8/15/2007
The North Carolina Baptist Hospital Gift Shop will offer online shopping beginning Aug. 15. The Web site, www.NCBHGiftShop.com, will be available to anyone with Internet access. NCBH is the first hospital in the state to offer an e-commerce Web site. The Web site will feature items such as: flowers, plants, cookies, candy, balloons, gift baskets, plush items, uniforms, shoes, gift items and gift certificates. In-house delivery will be available to customers. The service is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Shoppers can use credit cards and will need to provide billing and delivery information. All personal and financial information is protected and secured.

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8/9/2007
Anthony Atala, M.D., director of the Institute for Regenerative Medicine at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, was one of nine researchers awarded a Health Breakthrough Award on Aug. 7 from Ladies' Home Journal magazine. The awards recognize medical professionals who have transformed their area of health with results that dramatically benefit women and families. The honorees will also be featured in the September issue of the magazine, on sale Aug. 14th. Atala was honored for identifying a new stem cell derived from human amniotic fluid and placentas. The cells can assume the characteristics of many specialized cells in the body, potentially replacing diseased or damaged tissue. Like embryonic stem cells, amniotic cells can be grown in large quantities because they double in number every 36 hours. However, the more mature amniotic cells are less likely than embryonic cells to produce tumors, and they can be used without rejection issues. They are also accessib

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8/9/2007
As national spending on prescription drugs rose faster than any other segment of health care spending, the health plan at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center was able to maintain constant spending, resulting in savings of more than $6.6 million over three years. Four health plan interventions not only averted increases in prescription drug spending but also preserved members’ use of medications for chronic conditions, according to a manuscript published this week in The American Journal of Managed Care. “Other studies have found that single cost-control strategies such as increasing co-payments can decrease prescription drug spending,” said lead author David P. Miller, M.D., assistant professor in the Section of General Internal Medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. “However, we present the results of a combination of strategies used in concert.”

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8/1/2007
A relatively new, minimally invasive treatment was 100 percent successful in eradicating small malignant kidney tumors in a study of more than 100 patients, report researchers from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. The patients underwent CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) at Wake Forest Baptist for kidney tumors ranging in size from 0.6 cm to 8.8 cm. A total of 125 tumors in 104 patients were treated over the period 2000 to 2006. In all of the patients, a biopsy had confirmed the presence of renal cell carcinomas (RCC), a common type of renal malignancy. Of 95 tumors that were smaller than 3.7 cm (about 1.5 in.), all were completely eradicated by a single treatment, along with 14 of the larger tumors. Seven more of the 16 remaining larger tumors were eradicated after a second treatment, for a total 93 percent success rate for all 125 tumors. The results, reported in the August issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology, were based on follow-up exams over an

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7/27/2007
A class of drugs commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes may double the risk of heart failure, according to a new analysis by researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues.

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7/26/2007
Based on their surprising discovery that an obesity drug can kill cancer cells, scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine have made a new finding about the drug’s effects and are working to design more potent cancer treatments.

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7/26/2007
In the event of a radiation or nuclear attack by terrorists, it will be essential to provide the public with accurate information on risks and how to minimize health effects. Working with a team of the nation’s top radiation biologists, a scientist at Wake Forest University School of Medicine is developing an Internet-based training course to help radiation experts meet this challenge. The course, which will also be available on CD, will provide critical information that professionals in radiological sciences need to act as trainers and spokespersons during a radiologic or nuclear incident.

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7/25/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is one of the nation’s “Most Wired” hospitals, according to the results of the 2007 Most Wired Survey and Benchmarking Study released in the July issue of Hospitals & Health Networks magazine. The magazine has named the 100 Most Wired hospitals and health systems since 1999.

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7/24/2007
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – Carlos M. Ferrario, M.D., director of the Hypertension & Vascular Research Center at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, will deliver the Brenner Lecture this fall during Renal Week 2007, the annual conference of the American Society of Nephrology. The event is scheduled for Oct. 31 through Nov. 5 at the Moscone Center, San Francisco, Calif.

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7/23/2007
The Heart Center at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has received a $3.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to see if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to predict why some patients with diabetes, hypertension or prior coronary artery disease develop pulmonary congestion leading to hospitalization.

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7/23/2007
When a vomiting, simulated patient mannequin was rolled into the lecture hall last fall to teach large numbers of first- and second-year Wake Forest University School of Medicine students about the brain and nervous system, Michael T. Fitch, M.D., Ph.D., wasn’t sure what to expect.

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7/17/2007
About 15,000 children and adolescents in the United States are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, and about 3,700 youth are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes each year, according to estimates from a major national study called SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth. A multi-center study of childhood diabetes in racially and ethnically diverse populations, SEARCH is the largest surveillance effort of diabetes among youth under the age of 20 conducted in the United States to date. The study, which is coordinated at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, covers 10 locations across the country where about 5.5 million children live. In a report in the June 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, study investigators identified 2,435 youth who were diagnosed with type 1 and type 2 diabetes in 2002 and 2003. The estimated overall incidence of diabetes in youth is 24.3 per 100,000 per year.

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7/16/2007
Graham Denton of Charlotte, a retired Bank of America executive, is the new chairman of the board of directors of Wake Forest University Health Sciences. Denton, a graduate of Wake Forest, succeeds Marvin Gentry of King, who has served as chairman of the board for 10 years. Gentry continues as a member of the board. Wake Forest University Health Sciences, a division of Wake Forest University, operates the School of Medicine and Wake Forest University Physicians and is a part of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Health Sciences also includes 13 dialysis centers, One Technology Place, Biomedical Research Facility 1 and other buildings in the Piedmont Triad Research Park.

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7/13/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is listed as one of “America's Best Hospitals” in two categories by U.S. News & World Report in the July 25 issue of the magazine, which hits newsstands Monday, July 16. The magazine lists 50 hospitals in each of 16 categories. Wake Forest Baptist ranks 25th nationally in endocrinology on the latest list and 28th in respiratory disorders. The goal of the rankings is to identify facilities that excel at treating a variety of demanding illnesses within a specialty. Out of 5,462 hospitals evaluated, only 173 met that standard in one or more specialties.

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7/12/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has received a Gold Award for television advertising in the 24th Annual Healthcare Advertising Awards. The awards are sponsored by Healthcare Marketing Report, the leading publication covering all aspects of health care marketing, advertising and strategic business development. A record number of 4,300 entries were received in this year's competition, making the awards the largest and most prestigious health care advertising awards competition. Judges for the Healthcare Advertising Awards consisted of a national panel of health care marketers, advertising creative directors, advertising professionals, health care consultants, marketing professors, and the editorial board of Healthcare Marketing Report.

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7/12/2007
Some people have a genetic variation that makes them more susceptible to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) if they smoke tobacco, according to new research from Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues. “The genetic variant we studied seemed harmless on its own,” said Alireza Sadeghnejad, M.D., Ph.D., lead author. “But when someone has this variant, there is more of an adverse effect of smoking on lung function. Therefore, in combination with smoking, this genetic variant represents a risk factor for COPD.” Emphysema and chronic bronchitis are components of COPD, which is the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. and the only top-10 killer that is increasing in frequency. The World Health Organization predicts that by 2020, COPD will be the third-leading cause of death worldwide.

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7/12/2007
James C. Eisenach, M.D., has been selected as the editor-in-chief of Anesthesiology, the journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists with a circulation of 40,000. Eisenach is the FM James III Professor of Anesthesiology and the Department of Anesthesiology’s Vice Chair for Research. He is board certified in anesthesiology and specializes in obstetric anesthesia. Eisenach also conducts laboratory and clinical research focusing on understanding mechanisms of chronic pain and identifying new treatments.

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7/10/2007
As of noon on Tuesday, July 10, CompRehab Outpatient Services is open and seeing patients on site except for Otolaryngology (ENT) and Hearing and Speech departments. Otolaryngology staff are contacting patients who have scheduled appointments on Wednesday, July 11, and Thursday, July 12. If these patients or others have questions about their appointments, they should call 336-716-8200 for more information. The NCBH Fitness Center is temporarily closed until further notice. After experiencing water damage to sections of the building over the weekend due to a burst water pipe, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center administration acted quickly to notify patients and affected staff of the disruption. A specialized cleanup and restoration service is also on-site, as well as additional housekeeping and security personnel. The damage has not been fully assessed at this stage in the recovery process.

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7/9/2007
Entrées Made Easy, a national meal assembly franchise, will host a Charity Grand Opening Event at its newest location on Jonestown Road in Winston-Salem on Saturday, July 14th from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Brenner Children’s Hospital will receive 50% of the grand opening day proceeds. Rather than going through the usual time-consuming steps of shopping for, preparing, and clean up after dinner, an Entrées Made Easy customer needs only to go online to schedule a session at one of the locations. After the session is scheduled, the customer chooses what entrées they would like to prepare from a changing monthly menu. While at the store, customers assemble their chosen meals from fully stocked fresh food stations. The preparation of 12 meals takes less than 2 hours. Entrées can then be taken home to freeze, and can be grilled, sautéed, or slow-cooked in a crock pot at the customer’s leisure.

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6/29/2007
The most common procedure for clearing blocked kidney arteries can also release thousands of tiny particles into the bloodstream that can impair kidney function, according to researchers from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and colleagues. “This is the first data in humans to show that debris released during angioplasty and stenting of the kidney arteries can be harmful to kidney function,” said Matthew Edwards, M.D., M.S., lead researcher and an assistant professor of surgery. “It raises important questions about how to most safely perform this very common procedure.” Edwards said that understanding more about potential complications from the procedure can lead to improved treatments. The study, reported in the current issue of the Journal for Vascular Surgery, suggests that having patients stop aspirin use before the procedure may lead to worse results. It also shows that stent size is important and raises questions about whether blocking or filtering ou

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6/28/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is making final preparations to go tobacco free on July 1. This week the Medical Center disassembled all of its smoking areas. Over the past seven months, signs announcing the new policy were posted at every entrance and on tables in dining areas. The Medical Center became “smoke-free” for all interior spaces in 1994. This new policy applies to all tobacco use and covers parking areas as well as vehicles on the property.

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6/25/2007
A talk on globus, a condition that creates an uncomfortable feeling of a lump in the throat and is potentially dangerous if left untreated, will be held Thursday June 28 at 3 p.m. at BestHealth in Hanes Mall.

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6/25/2007
Studies in female monkeys helped raise important questions about hormone therapy that were addressed in a Women’s Health Initiative study reported last week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The animal research, conducted at the Wake Forest University Primate Center, also suggests the role that stress can play in heart disease development and point to the need for early prevention of heart disease. “Our research in monkeys suggests that stress can affect estrogen levels and may set the stage for heart disease later in life,” according to Jay Kaplan, Ph.D., professor of comparative medicine and director of the primate center. “It also suggests women need to start thinking about heart disease prevention before menopause. We found that the five years before menopause are when heart vessel disease begins to accelerate.” Kaplan and Thomas Clarkson, D.V.M., have published numerous articles from their monkey research on the effects of hormone therapy on heart vessel dise

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6/22/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center’s expertise using computed tomography (CT) scans to image heart vessels played a significant role in a Women’s Health Initiative study on hormone therapy published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine. Wake Forest Baptist developed one of the first cardiac CT systems in the United States and was selected to analyze the results of the study, which involved more than 1,000 women. The study, known as the Women’s Health Initiative Coronary Artery Calcium Study (WHI-CAC), used CT technology to measure calcified plaque in participants’ heart vessels. The presence of plaque documents the very early stages of atherosclerosis, the buildup of fatty deposits that block arteries and can cause heart attacks and strokes.

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6/22/2007
Research in mice suggests that a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil and certain types of fish could potentially improve the prognosis of men who are genetically prone to develop prostate cancer.

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6/15/2007
New research in animals suggests why the commonly prescribed cholesterol-lowering drug ezetimibe (Zetia®) is so potent. The research, reported by scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, is reported online today by the Journal of Clinical Investigation and will appear in the July 2 print issue. It had previously been thought that the drug works by preventing cells in the intestine from absorbing cholesterol. The new research suggests that Zetia also works in the liver. In both locations, the drug’s target is a protein known as NPC1L1 that moves cholesterol into the body’s cells. Zetia blocks the protein’s actions so cholesterol cannot be absorbed. Cholesterol comes not only from the foods we eat, but is also produced by the liver. The organ is involved in making cholesterol, as well as in taking up cholesterol and packaging it for the body’s use.

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6/15/2007
Aegis Family Health Centers will change its name to Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center (WFUBMC) Community Physicians, effective July 1. “Aegis has always been owned and managed by Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center,” said Lewis Thorp, chief executive officer of Aegis. “The name change is being made to more closely align Aegis with Wake Forest Baptist in the minds of patients and the community.” As it has in the past, WFUBMC Community Physicians will continue to participate in the education of interns, residents and other health professionals.

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6/14/2007
Can a fitness program for your brain improve thinking and concentration the way lifting weights can increase muscle strength? Early results from a Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center study suggest that attention training can change brain activity so older adults can block out distractions and improve concentration. Findings from the study, which used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to record brain activity, were presented today (June 14) at the Organization for Human Brain Mapping conference in Chicago. “There are a growing number of activities, from crossword puzzles to Sudoku, promoted as ways to keep our minds young,” said Jennifer Mozolic, a Wake Forest graduate student who presented the results. “Our early data suggest that attention training is indeed a way to reduce older adults’ susceptibility to distracting stimuli and improve concentration.”

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6/7/2007
Wake Forest University Health Sciences has changed the name of its Comparative Medicine Clinical Research Center (Friedberg Campus) to Wake Forest University Primate Center. This new name more accurately reflects the general animal population, research resources and focuses of the center. The Primate Center uses nonhuman primates (monkeys) as clinical surrogates for humans in the investigation of human health and disease. Research projects at the center are generated by basic science in the lab and studies that have progressed from other animal models. Nonhuman primate research also serves to test hypotheses made by physicians as a result of observing and treating human patients. The Primate Center houses about 750 monkeys of several varieties, as well as other animals used in research. Research at the center includes studies of women’s health and cardiovascular disease, breast cancer, uterine cancer, drug addiction, depression, diabetes, and diet and nutrition. Major

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6/7/2007
The music of jazz and popular music composer Cole Porter will be performed at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center on Thursday, June 21 at 12:15 p.m. at Davis Memorial Chapel. Admission is free. The line up of musicians includes bassist Matt Kendrick, saxophonist Wally West, pianist Fred Pivetta, drummer John Wilson, singer Martha Bassett, trumpeter Ken Wilmot and violinist Jacqui Carrasco. The program is part of the Arts Alive! performing arts series, presented by Wake Forest Baptist’s committee on Visual and Performing Arts and the Hawthorne Hill Society.

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6/4/2007
Through participation in a government-sponsored multi-year study, researchers at the Comprehensive Cancer Center at Wake Forest University have helped confirm that arsenic trioxide – marketed as Trisenox® – significantly improves patient survival when coupled with standard chemotherapy treatment in newly diagnosed patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia, or APL. Bayard Powell, M.D., principal investigator of the study and professor and section head of Hematology and Oncology at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, presented the findings today at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

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6/4/2007
Vaughn McCall, M.D., professor and chair of psychiatry at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, has been selected to serve on the American Board of Internal Medicine Sleep Medicine Test and Policy Committee for the new added qualifications examination in sleep medicine that will be offered in November. The examination will be given by the American Boards of Psychiatry and Neurology, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Otolaryngology, and Family Medicine. McCall will be one of only 13 sleep specialists in the United States, including only three psychiatrists, to serve on the sleep testing board. These boards certify physicians who possess the knowledge and skills necessary for the practice of their respective specialties. Those who display the capacity and determination to provide exceptional patient care in sleep medicine will be awarded a certificate of those added qualifications by the sleep medicine board.

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5/30/2007
A survey of 1,812 patients with moderate-to-severe asthma revealed that the disease was not controlled in 55 percent, despite the fact that most had health insurance and visited their health care providers regularly. “Even more shocking was the finding that 38 percent of controlled asthmatics and 54 percent of uncontrolled asthmatics reported having had an asthma attack during which they feared for their life,” said Stephen P. Peters, M.D., Ph.D., lead author and a professor of pediatrics, internal medicine-pulmonary and associate director of the Center for Human Genomics at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. The results from the survey, believed to be the first to assess the prevalence of uncontrolled asthma among a nationally representative sample of patients with moderate-to-severe asthma, are reported in the June issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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5/29/2007
Continuing medical education, newsletters and resource guides were only partially successful in changing the way that pediatricians handled behavioral health problems, according to a follow-up study at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. But external factors, especially “black box warnings” from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration “exerted a powerful effect on prescribing practices,” said Jane Williams, Ph.D., and colleagues, writing in the June issue of Clinical Pediatrics. So did the changes in the public mental health system brought about by North Carolina’s mental health reform. In 2004, the same group reported in Pediatrics that pediatricians were diagnosing and treating growing numbers of children with behavioral health problems – about 15 percent of the children they see – but did not always feel sufficiently trained to fill this new role.

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5/24/2007
J. Jeffrey Carr, M.D., M.S.C.E., professor of radiology, cardiology and public health sciences at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, was named one of Medical Imaging magazine’s “Top 10” in cardiovascular imaging for 2007.

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5/24/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center researchers have been engaged by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to participate in the first large-scale cardiovascular disease study of African-Americans.

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5/23/2007
Len B. Preslar Jr., who led North Carolina Baptist Hospital to new heights in quality of service, financial strength and state-of-the-art facilities, will retire June 30 as president and CEO.

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5/22/2007
Richard H. Dean, M.D., who has led Wake Forest University Health Sciences to a premier position in American medical education, will retire June 30 as president and CEO.

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5/22/2007
Maintaining a healthy body weight throughout adulthood may help prevent or delay the onset of physical disability as we age, according to researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues. The study, reported on-line by the International Journal of Obesity, found that older adults with a history of excess weight in midlife or earlier had worse physical performance than those who were normal weight throughout adulthood or became overweight in late adulthood. “The data suggest that interventions to prevent overweight and obesity in young and middle-age adults may be useful in preventing or delaying the onset of physical disability later in life,” said Denise K. Houston, Ph.D., R.D., lead author and an instructor in internal medicine-gerontology.

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5/21/2007
A diet rich in fruits, grains and low-fat dairy products has been shown to significantly lower blood pressure, but few Americans with high blood pressure are following it, according to research from Wake Forest University School of Medicine reported at the 22nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Society of Hypertension. A review of self-reported dietary habits of more than 4,000 adults with hypertension found that only 22 percent were following the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet. National guidelines call for the diet to be part of lifestyle changes recommended for all hypertensive patients. “Our study highlights the need to find better ways to implement these recommendations – from clear public health messages to reimbursement for dietary counseling for high-risk patients,” said lead researcher Philip Mellen, M.D., M.S., an assistant professor of internal medicine.

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5/21/2007
Francis M. James III, M.D., professor- and chair-emeritus of anesthesiology at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, has received the 2007 Distinguished Service Award of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology. The presentation was made today at the society’s meeting in Banff, Alberta, Canada. The society is dedicated to the practice of and research of obstetric anesthesiology and perinatology. The society’s 1,142 members, mostly from the United States and Canada, include anesthesiologists, obstetricians, pediatricians, neonatologists, and others interested in the perinatal period and the well-being of expectant mothers and their newborn children.

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5/18/2007
Seven faculty members of the Division of PHS at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center were recently recognized for contributions ranging from mentoring to research to service at the first-ever PHS Faculty Awards Banquet held March 28 at SciWorks. Gregory Burke, M.D., director of the division, served as the master of ceremonies.

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5/17/2007
In one of the first studies of its kind, researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine explored why blacks are less likely than other races to become living kidney donors, and the reasons are obesity and failure to complete the donor evaluation. “Obesity is a growing problem in the African-American community, particularly among women, and this reflects what we found in the study,” said Amber Reeves-Daniel, D.O., an instructor in internal medicine-nephrology. “The other issue is the social reasons for non-donation, including failure to complete the donor evaluation process. This issue is just not well understood.” Reeves-Daniel reported the results today at the 2007 American Transplant Congress in San Francisco.

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5/16/2007
People with mild asthma that is well-controlled with twice-daily use of inhaled steroids may be able to reduce inhaler use to once a day – or switch to a daily pill – according to new research conducted at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and 20 other centers.

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5/16/2007
Sara Quandt, Ph.D., a professor of public health sciences at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, has been named this year’s “Outstanding Researcher” by the National Rural Health Association (NRHA). The organization annually recognizes rural health leaders “whose dedication and commitment exemplify the highest standards of care and service in health.” The winners were nominated by and selected from their peers around the country. "The men, women and organizations honored here today were selected because of their outstanding contributions, significant achievements, and the innovative methods they use to make rural health care the quality standard," said Paul Moore, NRHA president-elect and emcee of the awards program.

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5/11/2007
A new professorship within the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has been created as part of one of the largest private gifts ever given to the Medical Center. The Snider Professorship is the leadership position of the groundbreaking Geropsychiatry Outreach (GO) Program that was created by Arnold H. Snider and his wife, Katherine, to reach frail elderly at home, improve their mental health, and prevent crisis institutionalization. The Sniders just recently added the professorship to the GO Program endowment, which is now called the Kate Mills Snider Geropsychiatry Outreach Program and Professorship Fund. The Snider Professor will direct the GO Program and serve as a professor in the Psychiatry Department. Not only does the Snider endowment provide salary support for the professor, the fund also supports the GO Program’s clinical nurse specialist and project manager.

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5/11/2007
The governing board of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has elected four new members, as the implementation begins of the integrated organizational structure. Arthur A. Gibel of Winston-Salem, CEO of Goodwill Industries of Northwest North Carolina, and William C. Warden Jr. of Wilkesboro, retired executive from Lowe’s, represent North Carolina Baptist Hospital on the Medical Center Board. Donald E. Flow of Winston-Salem, CEO of Flow Automotive, and K. Wayne Smith, a retired business and government executive from Newton, represent Wake Forest University Health Sciences on the Medical Center Board.

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5/10/2007
A diet high in whole grain foods is associated with a significantly lower risk of developing cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, according to an analysis conducted by researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. “Consuming an average of 2.5 servings of whole grains each day is associated with a 21 percent lower risk of cardiovascular disease compared to consuming only 0.2 servings,” said Philip Mellen, M.D., lead author and an assistant professor of internal medicine. “These findings suggest that we should redouble our efforts to encourage patients to include more of these foods in their diets.” These results were published on line in Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases and will appear in a future print issue.

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5/10/2007
Can an omega-3 fatty acid slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease? Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is one of 52 centers nationwide launching a study to help find the answer. Nutritionists have long endorsed fish as part of a heart-healthy diet, and now some studies suggest that omega-3 fatty acids found in the oil of certain fish, algae and human breast milk may also benefit the brain by lowering the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers at Wake Forest Baptist, supported by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health, will evaluate the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic (DHA) in a clinical trial, the gold standard for medical research.

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5/9/2007
Dana Plocheck, the current Terlingua International Chili Champion of the Chili Appreciation Society International (CASI), will lend her cooking expertise to the 17th annual Jim Crawford Memorial CASI State Championship Chili Cook-off on May 12 at the Piedmont Triad Farmers Market. A competitive chili cook since 1988, Plocheck cooks under the banner of “Lady Bug” chili. When asked the secret to her winning recipe, Dana credits “a couple of tablespoons of Mexene chili powder and a large dose of Lady Bug Luck.”

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5/8/2007
A new study in mice raises a tantalizing possibility – that humans may one day be able to eat any kind of fat they want without raising their risk of heart disease. “We deleted an enzyme in mice and they could eat any type of fat and not get heart disease,” said Lawrence Rudel, Ph.D., a professor of comparative medicine. “If you’re a mouse, it’s great. Of course, we don’t know yet if it will be the same in humans.” Rudel’s findings are reported online by Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology and will appear in a future print issue.

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5/7/2007
Some high blood pressure medicines may help protect older adults from declines in memory and other cognitive function, according to new research from Wake Forest University School of Medicine, reported today at the annual meeting of the American Geriatrics Society in Seattle. The drugs that researchers believe are protective are part of a class known as ACE inhibitors – specifically those types that reach the brain and may help reduce the inflammation that might contribute to Alzheimer’s disease. “For older adults who are going to take an ACE inhibitor drug for blood pressure control, it makes sense for their doctors to prescribe one that goes into the brain,” said Kaycee Sink, M.D., M.A.S., lead researcher and an assistant professor of internal medicine – gerontology.

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5/4/2007
Unintentional weight loss in older adults often leads to frailty, a decline in physical function and even death. So is it wise for older, overweight women to embark on a weight loss program? New research from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center suggests that these women are better off trying to lose weight – even if they regain some of it. “Our results suggest that losing weight through calorie cutting won’t lead to increased disability in older women,” said Jamehl Demons, M.D., lead investigator on a project evaluating the effects of weight loss on physical performance. And even when some of the weight was regained, the women still came out ahead.

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5/3/2007
Preserving the kidneys of deceased older donors on a pump – as opposed to the conventional method of storing and transporting organs in a cooler – may lower hospital costs, improve initial organ function, and promote greater use and more sharing of organs, according to new research by Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. “By placing kidneys on a portable pump, preservation times can be safely extended to permit more time for sharing organs across the country,” said Robert Stratta, M.D., lead researcher of the study, which is reported in the May issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. In addition, Stratta said, the pump can be used to project the kidney’s initial function – allowing for more appropriate matching of donor organs and recipients.

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5/2/2007
Final results from a multi-center study shows that repeated treatments of botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA or BOTOX®) over one year is well tolerated and results in a significant decrease in spasticity, pain frequency and average pain intensity in upper limbs following stroke, according to research from a neurologist at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Significant improvements in these outcome measures indicate a better quality of life for post-stroke patients suffering from spasticity-related pain, according to the researchers who presented their findings today at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology in Boston. Spasticity is a disabling condition that leaves the muscles and tendons permanently shortened and inhibits movement. “In the clinical setting, limb stiffness and pain are the most commonly reported symptoms of spasticity following a stroke, and relief of spasticity-related pain is a priority treatment goal for many patients,” said

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5/1/2007
Strokes strike about 700,000 people each year. Knowing your risk factors could prevent you from becoming a statistic. The Comprehensive Stroke Center at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is offering a free stroke screenings on Wednesday, May 8 from 2 - 7 p.m. Our experts in stroke care and rehabilitation from our nationally-recognized stroke center will be on hand to answer your questions. The screenings are free and open to those over 40 years of age who have not participated in a stroke screening in 2007. Two hundred appointments are available. Each stroke screening will include: total cholesterol, HDL, cholesterol ratio, glucose check, blood pressure check, counseling from experts at Wake Forest Baptist and a stroke risk assessment. In addition, some participants will receive a Doppler ultrasound screening if they meet certain stroke risk factors. Results follow-up will be provided by registered nurses. Participants must complete a consent form prior to

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5/1/2007
A national congenital heart disease (CHD) awareness campaign, “Miles and Millas Across America Heart Shadow Buddies™: Spreading Hope and Encouragement to Families Affected by CHD,” will visit Brenner Children’s Hospital from May 7 -11. The program is sponsored by the Angel's Pediatric Heart House (APHH), in collaboration with The Shadow Buddies Foundation and the Congenital Heart Information Network.

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4/30/2007
Frank Torti, M.D., M.P.H, director of the Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest University Health Sciences, will speak on “The Future of Cancer Therapeutics” at the next Tech Café, an informal gathering organized by the Technology Council of the Winston-Salem Chamber of Commerce. The event will be held from 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday May 15 at Foothills Brewing, 638 W. Fourth St. Admission is free, but an R.S.V.P. is requested to (336) 728-9204.

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4/30/2007
Drama certainly has the power to entertain, but can it also change behavior? A play about substance abuse was successful at prompting audience members to participate in substance abuse prevention activities, according to Allyn Howlett, Ph.D., from Wake Forest University School of Medicine. “This study provides evidence that drama can be an effective mechanism to educate and motivate,” said Howlett, who was team leader for the research. “The combination of emotion and information had a significant impact on personal activism.” The project involved creating and producing a play to educate the Durham, N.C., community about substance abuse issues and to encourage involvement in substance abuse prevention activities. The research was conducted while Howlett was a faculty member at the Julius L. Chambers Biomedical/Biotechnology Research Institute at North Carolina Central University in Durham.

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4/26/2007
David L. Kelly, Jr., M.D., was the honored guest and Meritorious Award recipient at the 23rd Annual Meeting of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves (AANS/CNS) in March.

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4/26/2007
The Women's Health Center of Excellence for Research, Leadership and Education at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center will hold its 10th annual Excellence Triathlon at Tanglewood Park in Clemmons on Saturday, May 12.

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4/25/2007
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has caused an unnecessary scare about some pain relievers by adding a warning to drugs that are safe, says Curt Furberg, M.D., Ph.D., from Wake Forest University School of Medicine. At the same time, he says the agency has failed to recognize the harm of a pain reliever that should be taken off the market. “The FDA is adding ‘black box’ warnings to all prescription and over-the-counter pain relievers – even to naproxen – which the evidence shows is safe,” said Furberg, who serves on the FDA Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. “This is based on the false assumption that all nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increase the risk of heart attacks. In fact, there are major differences between these agents.” In a commentary published by Trials (http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/8/1/13), an online journal of BioMed Central, Furberg says the FDA has failed to recognize current scientific evidence when it made decis

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4/24/2007
The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center announces the reappointment of Walton Wright Curl, M.D. as professor, orthopaedic surgery.

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4/23/2007
Older adults who don’t get enough vitamin D – either from their diets or exposure to the sun – may be at increased risk for poor physical performance and disability, according to new research from Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues. “With a growing older population, we need to identify better ways to reduce the risk of disability,” said lead author Denise Houston, Ph.D. “Our study showed a significant relationship between low vitamin D levels in older adults and poorer physical performance.” The results are reported in the April issue of the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences.

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4/19/2007
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has announced that reimbursements for Medicare heart transplant cases performed at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center will continue uninterrupted.

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4/18/2007
Dermatologists from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and the community will conduct a free skin cancer screening from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Thursday, May 3 at the Medical Center’s dermatology clinic, ninth floor, Richard Janeway Clinical Sciences Tower.

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4/18/2007
The physician assistant (PA) program at Wake Forest University School of Medicine is ranked 23rd in the nation by the 2008 edition of the book “America’s Best Graduate Schools” from U.S. News & World Report.

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4/16/2007
Neurologists at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center have found many patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) are not taking or being prescribed drugs approved to treat the disease. “When we looked at patients who are being seen by family practitioners and by neurologists, we were surprised at the number of people who are not benefiting from drugs proven to help reduce the side effects of MS,” said Cormac O’Donovan, M.D., a neurologist and co-investigator of the study. “Hopefully by educating physicians about the benefits of these drugs and beginning treatment early, we can slow the progression of this disease.” O’Donovan’s research was published this month by Biomed Central Medicine on their website at biomedcentral.com.

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4/12/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center will hold a dessert auction to benefit the Komen NC Triad Race for the Cure® on Monday, April 30, from noon to 1 p.m., in the Medical Center’s Ardmore Cafeteria. The public is invited to attend and bid on their favorite dessert. All proceeds from this event will be donated to Komen.

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4/12/2007
Scientists from Wake Forest University School of Medicine are the first to report that the stress hormone epinephrine causes changes in prostate and breast cancer cells that may make them resistant to cell death. “These data imply that emotional stress may contribute to the development of cancer and may also reduce the effectiveness of cancer treatments,” said George Kulik, D.V.M., Ph.D., an assistant professor of cancer biology and senior researcher on the project. The study results are reported on-line in the Journal of Biological Chemistry and will appear in a future print issue.

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4/11/2007
The Heart Center at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center will host the second annual “Heart and Sole” five-kilometer run and one-mile walk Saturday April 21 at 4th of July Park, 702 W. Mountain St., Kernersville. The event raises money for the Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program at Wake Forest Baptist. “Heart and Sole is a scenic run through the center of Kernersville, said Heart Center community outreach coordinator Stephanie Starling-Edwards, R.N. “We’ll get started bright and early at 7:30 a.m. handing out packets to the runners.”

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4/11/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is one of 60 sites in the country participating in a new research study to determine if two medications taken together are better for treating heart disease and stroke. The five-year study, known as AIM-HIGH, will evaluate the effectiveness of prescription extended-release niacin and Zocor taken together – versus taking Zocor alone. The study is being sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, with support from Abbott Laboratories. The study’s goal is to determine if the combination therapy reduces rates of heart attacks, strokes, and other related events. The Triad has two sites that are enrolling participants: the Department of Internal Medicine-Endocrinology at Wake Forest Baptist and the Kulynych Center for Research, Green Valley Drive, Greensboro.

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4/10/2007
Three Wake Forest University students, two from the School of Medicine and one from the School of Divinity, have been chosen as 2007-08 N.C. Schweitzer fellows. Shayla Nesbitt, Bryant Cameron Webb and John Lawrence are among 21 graduate students from health professional schools in North Carolina who will participate in the Schweitzer Fellows Program. Nesbitt, a post-baccalaureate premedical student, will provide HIV/Sexually-Transmitted Disease education to the Spanish-speaking population of Forsyth County.

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4/9/2007
Because of the 4,035 Forsyth County residents who participated in a long-running study of heart disease risk factors, researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and colleagues have made major findings such as how being overweight is associated with becoming disabled and that passive smoking increases the risk of hardening of the arteries. Participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study have been invited to hear an update on the study at a 20th anniversary observance on April 12 at the Hawthorne Inn and Conference Center. “This study has made important findings about heart disease that wouldn’t have been possible without this large group of people who participated,” said Lynne E. Wagenknecht, DrPH, professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Prevention at Wake Forest Baptist. “What we’ve learned from this study has been used by national health organizations to make recommendations to improve heart health for two decade

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4/9/2007
An international study involving 467 hospitals in 12 countries found that doctors do a good job of aggressively treating the early stages of heart attacks – even before laboratory tests confirm the diagnosis. “There has always been a concern that patients may be treated less aggressively when they present with heart attack symptoms before laboratory tests are able to confirm the diagnosis,” said Chadwick Miller, M.D., lead author and an emergency medicine physician at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. “But these findings suggest doctors are doing an appropriate job of aggressively treating these patients.” Results from the research, which included more than 8,000 patients, are reported on-line in the European Heart Journal and will appear in a future print issue.

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4/2/2007
A vaccine has been shown to help reduce the number of infants and toddlers developing frequent ear infections, according to new research from Katherine A. Poehling, M.D., a pediatrician at Brenner Children’s Hospital, part of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Results from her study were published in the April issue of Pediatrics. “This is exciting news for parents whose children suffer from frequent and painful ear infections,” she said. Poehling and a team of researchers followed about 27,000 children in New York and 150,000 children in Tennessee who were born between 1998 and 2002. Her goal was to determine the how the introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) into the vaccination schedule in mid-2000 affected the proportion of children developing frequent ear infections. The vaccine was approved to help protect children from invasive pneumococcal diseases such meningitis.

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3/30/2007
Wake Forest University School of Medicine ranks 18th in primary care and 44th in research among the nation's 145 medical and osteopathic schools in the 2008 edition of the book “America’s Best Graduate Schools” from U.S. News & World Report. The magazine also ranks training programs in other health disciplines. Wake Forest’s joint program with the University of North Carolina at Greensboro to train nurse anesthetists is ranked 11th. In primary care, Wake Forest tied with Dartmouth Medical School, Michigan State University, the University of California at Los Angeles, the University of Iowa, the University of Missouri at Columbia, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Southwestern Medical Center and Yeshiva University.

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3/27/2007
Is that pain in your chest a heart attack or indigestion? New research from Wake Forest University School of Medicine reveals that more areas of the brain than previously thought are involved in determining the location of pain. Spatial aspects of pain are a common problem in diagnosis, said Robert Coghill, Ph.D., senior researcher on the study and a neuroscientist at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Patients cannot always distinguish pain from indigestion and pain from a heart attack, for example. Pain from a nerve injury is often felt at sites other than at the injury. And, in some cases, an injury on one side of the body results in pain on both sides. “The scientific understanding of spatial aspects of pain is so limited that patients with widespread pain may get sent to a psychiatrist rather than a pain clinic,” said Coghill.

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3/26/2007
An international study using ultrasound technology has found that the most potent cholesterol-lowering drug is also effective at halting early changes in the blood vessels that can lead to atherosclerosis. “Rosuvastatin arrested the progression of thickened carotid arteries compared to a placebo,” said John R. Crouse, M.D., lead researcher and a professor of endocrinology at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. “The findings show that the benefits of cholesterol management on arteries can be extended to low-risk patients.” Results from the study were reported today at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology in New Orleans and will appear in the March 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. The research involved people with moderately elevated cholesterol levels who didn’t qualify for treatment under national guidelines.

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3/17/2007
Using blood and DNA samples from 4,000 women who participated in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), as well as information about the foods they consumed, researchers in the Center for Human Genomics at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine will explore the role of inflammation in colon, breast, and lung cancer – three of the most common types of cancer in women. Researchers will also attempt to identify how the women’s diets interacted with their genetic make-up.

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3/16/2007
The governing boards of North Carolina Baptist Hospital and Wake Forest University Health Sciences have agreed on a new, integrated organizational structure with a shared vision and strategy for Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. The boards endorsed a structure that will have a single overarching Medical Center governing body with the responsibility and authority to develop a unified vision, joint strategy and implement a coordinated plan. Building on considerable national recognition, the new structure “prepares the Medical Center for a distinguished future in a changing healthcare environment,” according to Steve Robertson, chairman of the Medical Center board. The structure will have one chief executive officer for the entire Medical Center, which, with more than 11,000 employees, is the largest employer in the Piedmont Triad. The combined net revenue of the organizations is projected to be $1.6 billion this year.

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3/15/2007
A hormone that is important in the control of blood pressure also shrinks lung cancer tumors in mice, suggesting a new way to prevent or treat the deadly cancer, according to scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Reporting in the journal Cancer Research, the scientists said that in mice treated with the hormone, angiotensin-(1-7), tumor volume decreased by 30 percent. In mice that did not receive the treatment, the tumor size more than doubled. Patricia E. Gallagher, Ph.D., and E. Ann Tallant, Ph.D., senior researchers on the project, had previously reported a similar effect in lung cancer cells studied in the laboratory.

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3/13/2007
College students who participate in date fighting are more likely to drink alcohol and engage in other health risk behaviors, according to a pediatric researcher at Brenner Children’s Hospital, part of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Robert H. DuRant, Ph.D., and his colleagues’ research results were published in the March/April issue of The Journal of American College Health. “For physicians and other health care providers of adolescents, screening for date fight involvement is an important component of well child care.” DuRant said. “Date fighting also tends to cluster with other health risk behaviors, such as illegal drug use and risky sexual behaviors.” Violence among young adults has become a significant public health problem, DuRant said. Previous research has found the percentage of adolescents in grades six through 12 who have engaged in dating violence ranges from 7 to 51 percent, depending on how the researchers define dating violence. In the cu

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3/12/2007
It is important for obesity surgery patients to take their prescribed vitamin supplements and to be alert for symptoms such as vomiting, confusion, lack of coordination and visual changes – signs of a serious neurological condition that can develop after the surgery. “There are more than 170,000 obesity surgeries performed annually in the United States and this neurologic condition, known as Wernicke encephalopathy, is increasingly being reported after the operation,” said Sonal Singh, M.D., lead author and an instructor in internal medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Wernicke encephalopathy is caused by a deficiency of thiamine and is often associated with severe alcoholism or chronic malnutrition. In obesity surgery patients, it can develop when patients stop taking their vitamin supplements, or when frequent vomiting prevents the vitamins from being absorbed. Vomiting can also occur after the surgery either as a complication of the procedure or if

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3/9/2007
Four new faculty members have joined the Continence Center at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Gopal Badlani, M.D., professor of urology, is a world expert in the field of urinary incontinence. He has been invited nationally and internationally as a visiting professor. He is managing editor of the Journal of Endourology, is editor of several textbooks and has published more than 200 manuscripts and book chapters. Badlani completed his urology residency at Long Island Jewish Medical Center and a fellowship in neurourology at Baylor University. He specializes in urinary incontinence in women and men and in minimally invasive treatments for pelvic organ prolapse and prostate obstruction. His lab has done basic research in the etiology of pelvic organ prolapse.

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3/6/2007
The largest study ever conducted on acne and stress reveals that teenagers who were under high levels of stress were 23 percent more likely to have increased acne severity, according to researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues. “Acne significantly affects physical and psychosocial well-being, so it is important to understand the interplay between the factors that exacerbate acne,” said Gil Yosipovitch, M.D., lead author and a professor of dermatology. “Our study suggests a significant association between stress and severity of acne.” The results of the study, which involved 94 adolescents from Singapore, are reported today in Acta Derm Venereol, a Swedish medical journal.

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3/2/2007
“Neuroscience of the Ailing Brain: New Horizons of Mechanism and Treatment,” A major regional symposium on neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's, ALS, Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia and dyslexia will be held in Babcock Auditorium at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center on March 16.

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2/12/2007
About 250 older adults in Scotland and Hoke Counties will be contacted soon and asked about how they manage their health by using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The interviews will be part of a research project by Wake Forest University School of Medicine aimed at understanding the use of these products and services and their relationship with the use of conventional health care. The information will be collected in participants’ homes by interviewers who will be trained by the Wake Forest research team. The study will involve black and white adults who are 65 and older. The use of CAM is growing in popularity in the United States. In 2002, about two-thirds of adults reported using some form of CAM to manage their health. An estimated $50 billion dollars are spent on CAM therapies each year in the United States. Some research suggests that CAM use is more common in the rural South, and among older adults.

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2/7/2007
When it comes to body fat, today’s older adults face a double whammy, according to new research from Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues. Up until age 80, older adults not only gain fat as they age – but because of the obesity epidemic – they actually begin their older years fatter. The result is an increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, arthritis and disability, according to Jingzhong Ding, M.D., Ph.D., lead author and a researcher on aging at Wake Forest Baptist. The study, reported in the current issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, focuses on changes in body composition related to aging and in the population over time. It is significant because the researchers used DEXA (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) to measure actual body fat to determine the proportion of fat versus lean mass (muscle and organs).

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2/6/2007
An approved drug for fighting obesity is helping scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine uncover clues about how to stop the growth of cancerous tumors. “Our discovery makes an exciting treatment target because theoretically you don’t have to worry about harming nearby healthy tissue,” said senior researcher Steven J. Kridel, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Cancer Biology. In the current issue of Cancer Research, Kridel and colleagues are the first to report that a tubular network within cells, known as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), is regulated by an enzyme that is tightly linked to tumor growth and development.

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2/5/2007
The length of time it can take to rid homes of lead hazards is “unacceptable” according to researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine and colleagues in this month’s American Journal of Public Health. “This is the first study that looks at the time that it takes from a child’s first blood lead level (BLL) test to the time when their home is made lead safe,” said Kristina M. Zierold, Ph.D., lead author. “We knew there were a lot of kids with elevated BLLs, but nobody really knew how long it was taking to remove the exposure.” The study was conducted in Wisconsin while Zierold was an epidemic intelligence service officer with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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2/1/2007
The time is ripe for scientific organizations to adopt codes of ethics, according to a scientist and bioethicist from Wake Forest University School of Medicine in the current issue of Science and Engineering Ethics. “Medical practice and human subject research is influenced by the Hippocratic tradition,” said Nancy L. Jones, Ph.D., “but no similar code of ethics has been formalized for the life and biomedical sciences. Like the Hippocratic oath, a code of ethics for the life sciences can provide a continual standard to shape the ethical practice of science.” Jones, an adjunct associate professor at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, is an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) science and technology policy fellow at the National Institutes of Health. She is a fellow at the Center for Bioethics and Human Dignity and is a recent member of the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protection of the U.S. Department of Health and Human

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2/1/2007
Women have conflicting attitudes about participating in clinical trials because of uncertainties about trusting the experimenters, fear of the trial itself, and hope that the research will result in medical progress, according to a new study at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Researchers in the Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy said in the February issue of the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved that they especially focused their research on black women and low socio-economic status white women. “Enrolling representative populations is essential to the generalizability of study findings,” wrote the team – Deborah F. Farmer, Ph.D., Sharon A. Jackson, Ph.D., and Mark A. Hall, J.D. The researchers noted that Congress mandated including women and minorities in clinical trials in 1993, yet women and minorities continue to be under-represented.

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1/31/2007
A new procedure for predicting heart attack, developed by Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center physicians, will be demonstrated in a live webcast Tuesday Feb. 20 at 5 p.m. By speeding up the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner and creating new software, Medical Center researchers have made it possible for physicians to see heart movement within seconds after it happens — compared to an average of five minutes to see images previously. Wake Forest Baptist is one of two sites nationwide using the software, called CardioVue. The software analysis system is particularly useful in emergencies due to its rapid real-time capabilities. This unique tool enables physicians to perform a real-time evaluation of a patient’s cardiac system by taking a large volume of raw cardiac magnetic resonance images and transforming them into superior images previously unavailable.

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1/30/2007

Reeves Named Director of Nursing Reeves Named Director of Nursing WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Bonnie Reeves joined Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center as a director of nursing. She has over 25 years of experience in nursing leadership. Prior to joining Wake Forest Baptist, Reeves served as the

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1/24/2007

Transplant Program Performs More Than 100 Transplants for Fifth Year Transplant Program Performs More Than 100 Transplants for Fifth Year WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - For the fifth consecutive year, the Abdominal Organ Transplantation Program at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center has performed more than 1

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1/22/2007
Cardiologists at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center are helping to lead a large international study involving 83 other sites that will test 3,000 patients in an effort to determine whether exercise really is good for heart failure patients. Though doctors have promoted the value of exercise for a variety of disorders for years, “exercise training has not been definitively established as safe in the group of patients who primarily have heart failure,” said Dalane W. Kitzman M.D., a cardiologist who is principal investigator at Wake Forest Baptist, and colleagues, writing in the American Heart Journal.

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1/19/2007
The Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest University will receive an additional five years of funding as a National Cancer Institute- designated comprehensive cancer center. It is one of only 39 cancer centers in the United States to hold this distinction. “Since we were awarded our first designation from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in 1974, our Comprehensive Cancer Center has received continuous funding in the face of increased competition and decreased funding,” said Frank M. Torti, M.D., M.P.H., director of the center. It has held the comprehensive status since 1991.

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1/18/2007
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center is offering a two-hour clinic designed to teach young throwing athletes appropriate strengthening and flexibility exercises to enhance throwing performance while reducing the risks of injury. Clinics will be held Saturday, January 20 from 9am to 11am and Saturday, January 27 from 9am to 11am. Registration fee is $10 for the first athlete and $7 for each additional sibling or friend. Participants should be between the ages of 9 and 16. Parents are encouraged to attend and participate at no charge. Call 716-8113 to register or for more information. CompRehab is located at 131 Miller Street.

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1/18/2007
Thomas F. Slaughter, M.D., professor of anesthesiology, has been named head of the Section of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia in the Department of Anesthesiology. The section oversees the anesthesia care of more than 600 patients undergoing heart and lung surgeries each year. “Dr. Slaughter is a nationally recognized expert in blood transfusion and clotting abnormalities,” said Raymond C. Roy, Ph.D., M.D., chairman of anesthesia, in making the announcement. “We are extremely pleased to have a physician of his caliber to lead the section.”

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1/18/2007
Brenner Children’s Hospital is sponsoring a new exhibit at the Winston-Salem Children’s Museum called Circulate It!, beginning this month. Circulate It! is a fun, interactive exhibit that encourages children to keep their hearts healthy by moving around. The children’s museum will hold an official ribbon cutting on Friday, January 26 at 10 a.m. The opening ceremony will be followed by preschool discovery story time at 11 a.m. for children and their siblings. In addition, staff at the museum will be doing the "Snowflake Shuffle" all day with fun for children of all ages. There will be fun, snow-related arts and crafts, snow stories and a huge lost-mitten hunt through the museum.

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1/18/2007
Jeff D. Williamson, M.D., M.H.S., has been named head of the Section on Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine in the Department of Internal Medicine. His role includes leading the clinical programs for aging adults that are part of the J. Paul Sticht Center on Aging and Rehabilitation. “Dr. Williamson is well prepared for this important position,” said Thomas D. DuBose Jr., M.D., the Tinsley R. Harrison Professor and Chair of the Department of Internal Medicine. “His national reputation and superb credentials, particularly his experience and proven capabilities in research, patient care, education and administration, renders him an excellent choice for this position.”

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1/11/2007
Students at Wake Forest University School of Medicine will sponsor a “Share the Health” fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday Jan. 20 at Marketplace Mall, 2101 Peters Creek Parkway. The health fair will include screenings for cholesterol, glaucoma, high blood pressure, diabetes, osteoporosis, lung function, HIV/AIDS, sickle cell anemia and hepatitis B. Admission is free. Members of Wake Forest University athletic teams will be on hand to sign autographs, and speakers from the medical school faculty will discuss topics such as pediatric obesity, nutrition, exercise and diabetes. Last year, a record 625 people participated in the fair; this year co-chairs Blair Simpson and Lindsay Chaney are hoping for more than 1,000 participants.

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1/10/2007
Researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine are the first to report that in animal studies, a common diabetes drug prevents the memory and learning problems that cancer patients often experience after whole-brain radiation treatments. “These findings offer the promise of improving the quality of life of these patients,” said Mike Robbins, Ph.D., senior researcher. “The drug is already prescribed for diabetes and we know the doses that patients can safely take.” Whole-brain radiation is widely used to treat recurrent brain tumors as well as to prevent breast cancer, lung cancer and malignant melanoma from spreading to the brain. About 200,000 people receive the treatment annually, and beginning about a year later, up to one-half develop progressive cognitive impairments that can affect memory, language and abstract reasoning.

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1/9/2007
A research team at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and the University of Heidelberg has proven that a gene protects some people with diabetes from developing severe kidney failure or "end-stage renal disease." Diabetes is the leading cause of end-stage kidney disease worldwide, an illness that requires either kidney dialysis treatments or a kidney transplant for survival. The carnosinase 1 gene, located on human chromosome 18, produces the protective factor, said Barry I. Freedman, M.D., the John H. Felts III Professor and head of the Section on Nephrology, in an article in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation published online.

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1/7/2007
Scientists have discovered a new source of stems cells and have used them to create muscle, bone, fat, blood vessel, nerve and liver cells in the laboratory. The first report showing the isolation of broad potential stem cells from the amniotic fluid that surrounds developing embryos was published today in Nature Biotechnology.

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