About Us > News & Media > News Releases > 2012

Wake Forest Baptist Receives $8.9 Million NIH Grant to Study Genomic Link to Premature Cardiovascular Disease

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C., –Sept. 10, 2012– Researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center are leading a four-year, $8.9 million national project to identify variations in the human genome and corresponding changes in the arterial proteins associated with premature development of atherosclerosis.


The other institutions collaborating with Wake Forest Baptist in this project are Harvard Medical School, The Johns Hopkins University–Bayview Campus, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Va., The University of Texas Science Center at Houston, and Louisiana State Health Sciences Center, New Orleans.


The purpose of this collaborative study is to provide novel insights into the interdependent networks of genes and proteins that put some individuals at risk of premature cardiovascular disease. Ultimately, such information could lead to new screening strategies and help identify new therapeutic targets to reduce the human and financial costs of cardiovascular disease worldwide.
Researchers will analyze data from a unique, NIH-funded repository held at Louisiana State Health Sciences Center that provides data, DNA and tissue samples from 3,400 young (15- to 34-year-old) multi-ethnic subjects who died of non-cardiovascular causes.


David M. Herrington, M.D., MHS, professor of Cardiology, and principal investigator for this national collaboration, says the aim is to create a detailed molecular characterization of arterial tissue with the purpose of identifying the genetic variants associated with premature cardiovascular disease. “By using state-of-the-art molecular and analytic methods, we will be able to determine the genomic and proteomic architecture of premature atherosclerosis,” Herrington said. “This will add fundamentally new knowledge about the link between the genome and the proteome in the artery wall.”


Herrington is joined by three Wake Forest colleagues, Randolph L. Geary, M.D., Vascular Surgery, Timothy D. Howard, Ph.D., Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine Research and Yongmei Liu, M.D., Ph.D., Public Health Sciences-Epidemiology and Prevention, as co-investigators in this project.


Note: This collaborative project titled Genomic and Proteomic Architecture of Atherosclerosis is funded by the National Institutes of Health grant number 1R01HL111362-01A1.

Media Relations Contacts:

Quick Reference

News Media Resources

Media Inquiries
336-716-4587
Patient Information
336-713-0000
Satellite Interviews
336-716-4434

Ways to Give

Spotlight

PHS

The Division of Public Health Sciences (PHS) identifies strategies to enhance public health and prevent disease.

Last Updated: 08-02-2013
USNWR 2013-2014Magnet Hospital RecognitionConsumer Choice2014 Best DoctorsJoint Commission Report

Disclaimer: The information on this website is for general informational purposes only and SHOULD NOT be relied upon as a substitute for sound professional medical advice, evaluation or care from your physician or other qualified health care provider.