Medical Expert - William P. Bozeman, MD

Area of Expertise: Emergency Medicine - Trauma
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William P. Bozeman, MD

Professor of Emergency Medicine

Dr. Bozeman is a national advocate of law enforcement use of less lethal weapons in order to reduce or eliminate injuries and deaths among police officers, suspects, and the public whenever possible. He has conducted national studies on the use of conducted electrical weapons or TASER®, including the first large, independent study of injuries from their use. Bozeman's clinical and research interests include trauma resuscitation, cardiac arrest resuscitation, emergency medical services, tactical (SWAT team) medicine, and disaster medicine. In past experience, he has served as a tactical physician for several SWAT teams and served on federal Disaster Medical Assistance Teams in both Florida and North Carolina. From 1999 to 2003, he served as a NASA Space Shuttle support physician. He is one of a few Emergency Medicine doctors nationwide who is specially trained in trauma and critical care by the Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, Md. Bozeman earned his medical degree from the Medical University of South Carolina and completed his residency at Johns Hopkins University.

Keywords

Emergency Trauma, Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation, Emergency Management Services, SWAT (tactical physician), disaster management, TASER

IN THE NEWS

Tasered Youth Fare as Well as Adults, New Research Says
Adolescents who are tasered by law enforcement officers do not appear to be at higher risk for serious injury than adults, according to new a new study from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center researchers.
Wake Forest Baptist Research Provides Clue to Unexplained Excited Delirium Deaths

William P. Bozeman, M.D., an emergency medicine physician at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, has conducted new research into unexpected deaths that may be caused by an abnormal cardiac condition called Long QT Syndrome (LQTS), compounded by a situation of Excited Delirium (ExD) Syndrome.

Wake Forest Baptist Study Suggests Tasers Dont Cause Cardiac Complications

 William P. Bozeman, M.D., an associate professor of emergency medicine at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, and colleagues reviewed 1,201 cases of real-life Taser uses by law enforcement agencies but found none in which the devices could be linked to cardiac complications, even when the Taser probes landed on the upper chest area and may have delivered a shock across the heart.

 

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Bret A. Nicks, M.D.
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Assistant Dean of Global Health

Chief Medical Officer (CMO) at Wake Forest Baptist Health – Lexington Medical Center and Wake Forest Baptist Health –  Davie Medical Center
Area of Expertise: Emergency Medicine - Trauma

Dr. Nicks is an American College of Emergency Physicians spokesperson and the assistant medical director in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Wake Forest Baptist. He also serves as the medical director for the emergency department at Moses Cone Memorial Hospital, in


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