Medical Expert - Floyd Ski Chilton, Ph.D.

Area of Expertise: Omega 3
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Floyd Ski Chilton, Ph.D.

Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology

Chilton, director of the Center for Botanical Lipids at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, is widely recognized for his work on the role of fatty acid metabolism in human diseases, plus the role that inflammation plays in so many diseases such as cardiac, diabetes, arthritis. Based on his own and others' research, Chilton is a major proponent of the addition of fiber to the diet, balancing the omega fats and increasing specific families of polyphenols.

Chilton founded the program in Molecular Medicine at Wake Forest University Health Sciences and helped build it into one of the most successful programs of its kind in the United States. In 1999, he founded a biotechnology company, Pilot Therapeutics, and served as the President, CEO and Chief Technology Officer from late 2000 to early 2003. At Pilot Therapeutics, Chilton developed a medical food called Airozin™ that blocks lipid mediators that cause asthma and arthritis. In 2003, Chilton was named as an Ernst and Young Entrepreneur of the Year Finalist for the Carolinas (1 of 3 finalists from over 400 CEOs in North and South Carolina in the Biotechnology/Life Sciences category).

He is the author or co-authored more than 110 scientific articles and book chapters. He holds 32 issued and 17 pending patents.  He is the author of three books, “Inflammation Nation,” “Win The War Within,” and his latest “The Gene Smart Diet,” that outlines an anti inflammatory diet and exercise program to help reduce risk of chronic diseases.

Keywords

Omega-3 rich fish, omega fats, inflammation, botanical lipids, fiber, Nordic or Scandinavian diet, lean meat, whole grains, vegetables, berries and low-fat dairy

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