2013 Download Center Archive

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center Opens Expanded Comprehensive Cancer Center

The $125 million capital construction project that began in June 2011 opens its doors to patients early December as the region’s first dedicated cancer hospital. The expansion increases the number of acute care oncology inpatient beds and adds a new oncology intensive care unit and four inpatient floors, as well as a day hospital floor and one administrative floor, consolidating all inpatient and outpatient services under one roof to improve convenience and the patient experience.

The opening of the expanded Cancer Center comes on the heels of the 2013 U.S. News & World Report rankings that listed Wake Forest Baptist as the No. 1 cancer hospital in North Carolina and No. 12 in the country. It is also one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers in the country, in what is considered among the most prestigious of cancer designations.

Download Materials:
News Release Gov. Pat McCroy bio Construction Infographic
Event Program John McConnell bio Construction Information
Fact Sheet Edward Abraham bio CCC Accreditation
Q&A    
CCC Floor Directory    


For high resolution versions of the thumbnail images below, please contact Media Relations at 336-716-4587.

 
 
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John D. McConnell, M.D., chief executive officer of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, points out to Governor Pat McCrory how dry erase boards offer a low tech solution for seamless communication between staff, patient and family, especially during shift changes. Dr. McConnell leads Governor McCrory through one of the family waiting areas on the 6th Floor of the newly expanded Comprehensive Cancer Center.
   
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Dr. McConnell explains to Governor McCrory with Edward Abraham, M.D., dean of the Wake Forest School of Medicine, how the design of the Comprehensive Cancer Center is patient and family centered. Governor Pat McCrory answers questions from the media about the statewide impact of the newly expanded Comprehensive Cancer Center.
   
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Bayard Powell, M.D., chief of hematology/oncology, shares with Governor McCrory the additional benefits the expansion offers to patients. Dr. Powell and Dr. McConnell lead Governor McCrory to the Comprehensive Cancer Center program on the 10th Floor of the Comprehensive Cancer Center.
   
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John D. McConnell, M.D., chief executive officer of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, introduces Governor Pat McCrory during the program. Governor Pat McCrory remarks to local officials and special guests during the program how the Comprehensive Cancer Center expansion will help attract the best researchers to the area.
   
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The Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center has been expanded to include all inpatient and outpatient services under one roof, creating ease of access and comfort for patients and their families. Dichroic glass panels are embedded in the exterior walls of the Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, causing an array of colors.
   
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The rooftop courtyard of the Comprehensive Cancer Center at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center is accessible from the fifth floor and is home to a steel sculpture titled “Inspirations.” The Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center’s rooftop courtyard provides a calm and comforting place for patients, families and staff to gather.
   
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A new inpatient room of the Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center offers natural light and family comforts like a recliner and sleeper sofa. Nursing stations, like this one in the inpatient expansion of the Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, are the hub of patient care.

 


 

Wake Forest Baptist Health – Davie Medical Center in Bermuda Run Media Preview

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center announced Tuesday the completion of Phase I of Wake Forest Baptist Health-Davie Medical Center in Bermuda Run. The $89 million project includes Medical Plaza One (a medical office building with cardiac and orthopaedic rehabilitation facilities, lab services and a pharmacy) and Medical Plaza Two (a 24/7 Emergency Department for adults and children; outpatient surgery services in orthopaedics, ophthalmology, cardiology, neurology and podiatry; extensive imaging capabilities in cardiology and neurology in addition to digital mammography, CT, mobile MRI and X-ray).

Download Materials:
Press Release
Program
Fact Sheet
Davie Medical Center map

For high resolution versions of the thumbnail images below, please contact Media Relations at 336-716-4587.

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Click on the individual images below to download PDF flyers. 

DMC Community Day open house flyer Wake Forest Baptist Health-Davie Medical Center Capabilities
DMC Community Day
open house flyer
 Wake Forest Baptist Health-Davie Medical Center Capabilities



 

Institute for Regenerative Medicine to Lead National Effort to Aid Wounded Warriors

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's Institute for Regenerative Medicine has been selected to lead the second phase of the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine (AFIRM). The five-year, $75 million federally funded project focuses on applying regenerative medicine to battlefield injuries.

View the full news release.


For high resolution versions of the thumbnail images below, please contact Media Relations at 336-716-4587.

Anthony Atala, M.D., director, of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, making the announcement about the grant. Edward Abraham, M.D., dean of the Wake Forest School of Medicine, making the announcement about the grant.
Anthony Atala, M.D., director, of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, making the announcement about the grant. Edward Abraham, M.D., dean of the Wake Forest School of Medicine, making the announcement about the grant.
   
Anthony Atala, M.D., director, of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, taking questions from the media about the grant.  
Anthony Atala, M.D., director, of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, taking questions from the media about the grant.  
   
Oxygen-Generating Materials  
Christina Ross, Ph.D., research fellow, prepares research materials in a low-oxygen environment. Prafulla Chandra, Ph.D., research fellow, demonstrates oxygen-generating materials that are used in AFIRM-II research.
Christina Ross, Ph.D., research fellow, prepares research materials in a low-oxygen environment. Prafulla Chandra, Ph.D., research fellow, demonstrates oxygen-generating materials that are used in AFIRM-II research.
   
Muscle Bioprinting  
Young Joon Seol, Ph.D., research fellow, at work on a project to print experimental muscle tissue for reconstructive surgery.  
Young Joon Seol, Ph.D., research fellow, at work on a project to print experimental muscle tissue for reconstructive surgery.  
   
Muscle Bioreactors  
Hannah Baker, B.S., doctoral student, uses an “organ bath” system to evaluate the function of engineered muscle tissue. A “bioreactor” that mimics the work that muscle does in the body is used to engineer experimental muscle tissue in the lab.
Hannah Baker, B.S., doctoral student, uses an “organ bath” system to evaluate the function of engineered muscle tissue. A “bioreactor” that mimics the work that muscle does in the body is used to engineer experimental muscle tissue in the lab.
   
Skin Printer  
Jaehyun Kim, Ph.D., research fellow, demonstrates skin printing technology on a mock hand. Jaehyun Kim, Ph.D., research fellow, demonstrates a scanner that is used to measure wound shape and topography. The data are used to guide the printer as it lays down cell-containing biomaterials.
Jaehyun Kim, Ph.D., research fellow, demonstrates skin printing technology on a mock hand. Jaehyun Kim, Ph.D., research fellow, demonstrates a scanner that is used to measure wound shape and topography. The data are used to guide the printer as it lays down cell-containing biomaterials.
   
Erectile Tissue  
As part of a project to engineer experimental erectile tissue in the lab, Hyunhee Ahn, Ph.D., research fellow, injects a scaffold with cells.  
As part of a project to engineer experimental erectile tissue in the lab, Hyunhee Ahn, Ph.D., research fellow, injects a scaffold with cells.  
   
Anal Sphincter  
An experimental lab-engineered anal sphincter is removed from the mold that is part of the engineering process.  
An experimental lab-engineered anal sphincter is removed from the mold that is part of the engineering process.  
   
Electrospinning  
Scientists designed a two-layer blood vessel scaffold to provide favorable conditions for smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells, the cells that line vessels.  
Scientists designed a two-layer blood vessel scaffold to provide favorable conditions for smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells, the cells that line vessels.  

 


 

Wake Forest Baptist Leads $24 million Project to Develop “Body on a Chip”

Whether it’s the Ebola virus or sarin and ricin, a key to responding to chemical or biological attacks is having effective antidotes at the ready. To accelerate the development of new therapies, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine <http://www.wakehealth.edu/WFIRM/>, a part of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center <http://www.wakehealth.edu/>, is leading a unique $24 million federally funded project to develop a “body on a chip” that will be used to develop these countermeasures.

View the full news release.

Click on the image below to download a high resolution video of Anthony Atala, M.D., Director, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine and b-roll footage from his lab.

For high resolution versions of the thumbnail images below, please contact Media Relations at 336-716-4587.

Developed by scientists at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, this system of pumps and fluid channels houses miniature tissues samples that can be exposed to toxins as well as potential treatments. The ultimate goal is to evaluate heart, lung, liver and blood vessel tissue. Hyun-Wook Kang, Ph.D., instructor, oversees the 3-D printer that will be used to print miniature organs for the Body on a Chip system.
Developed by scientists at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, this system of pumps and fluid channels houses miniature tissues samples that can be exposed to toxins as well as potential treatments. The ultimate goal is to evaluate heart, lung, liver and blood vessel tissue. Hyun-Wook Kang, Ph.D., instructor, oversees the 3-D printer that will be used to print miniature organs for the Body on a Chip system.
   
Aleks Skardal, Ph.D., post-doctoral fellow, assembles part of the Body on a Chip system. A kidney structure being printed by the 3-D printer.
Aleks Skardal, Ph.D., post-doctoral fellow, assembles part of the Body on a Chip system. A kidney structure being printed by the 3-D printer.
   
Ivy Mead, B.S., doctoral student, views cellular images from the microscope. A combination microscope and incubator is used to image tissue over time. This technology will allow scientists to optimize the engineering of organ structures that will form the “Body on a Chip.”
Ivy Mead, B.S., doctoral student, views cellular images from the microscope. A combination microscope and incubator is used to image tissue over time. This technology will allow scientists to optimize the engineering of organ structures that will form the “Body on a Chip.”


 

New Initiative Addresses Physician Assistant Shortage in Underserved Areas throughout the State

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and Appalachian State University have partnered to address the health care provider shortage that plagues rural and underserved areas throughout North Carolina by establishing an extension of the physician assistant program at Wake Forest School of Medicine that will begin in June 2014.

To help address the need for physician assistants in underserved communities, the program will target students from the Appalachian region who want to train and work in these underserved areas, as well as veterans of the United States military.

For high resolution versions of the thumbnail images below, please contact Media Relations at 336-716-4587.

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Study: Limiting contact in practice could greatly reduce risk of head injuries in pre-teen football players

Less contact during practice could mean a lot less exposure to head injuries for young football players, according to researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and Virginia Tech University.

Their study of 50 youth-league players ages 9 to 12 – only the second ever done to measure the effects of head impacts in youth football – found that contact in practice, not games, was the most significant variable when the number and force of head hits incurred over the course of a season were measured.

 


Match Day 2013

Match Day 2013

On March 15, 2013, seniors at Wake Forest School of Medicine learned where they will begin their careers as doctors in the annual Match Day event. Every year graduating medical students across the country simultaneously open envelopes to learn where they “matched” and will spend the next three to seven years of residency training. It’s a tradition that is followed only by medical schools and has occurred for 61 years.

This year 124 Wake Forest medical students, 62 men and 62 women, matched in 25 specialties.

The medical students at Wake Forest were among the more than 40,000 applicants who sought residency positions through the national residency program this year, making this the largest Match in history, according to the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). NRMP is a private, not-for-profit corporation established in 1952 to provide a uniform date of appointment to positions in graduate medical education (GME) in the United States.

For additional information on Wake Forest School of Medicine.

For additional information on the national Match program.

What are the specialties “matched” by Wake Forest medical students?

 

Anesthesiology - 10
Child Neurology - 1
Emergency Medicine - 10
Family Medicine - 10
Internal Medicine - 26
Internal Medicine/Primary - 3
Medicine/Pediatrics - 1
Neurology - 3
Neurosurgery - 2
OBGYN - 2
Ophthalmology - 2
Orthopaedics - 3
Otolaryngology - 4
 Pathology - 4
Pediatrics - 13
Pediatrics/Primary - 1
Pediatrics/Research – 1
Psychiatry – 3
Rehab Medicine – 1
Radiology – 3
Radiation Oncology – 1
Surgery – 9
Surgery Preliminary – 8
Transitional – 2
Urology - 1

 



Wake Forest Innovation Quarter

Download the Wake Forest Innovation Quarter Media KitA new brand for a new research park model where people Work, Live, Learn, and Play.

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center announced a new name for its research park,
'Wake Forest Innovation Quarter'
(www.WakeForestInnovationQuarter.com), and a list of exciting new business developments related to its commercialization enterprise, Wake Forest Innovations.

See our ads.

Look at the new logos.

This new brand builds on the Wake Forest Innovations name and at the same time differentiates the urban-based Innovation Quarter from other research parks in the state and nation. Further, "Wake Forest Innovation Quarter" positions the development of a major eco-system in downtown Winston-Salem as a new national hub for innovation in biomedical technology, materials science, and information technology.

Commercialization

In a move designed to jump-start operations at the new commercialization enterprise, Wake Forest Innovations launched its public website, WakeForestInnovations.com, as the primary way for industry and other business partners to engage with Wake Forest Innovations and its internal business units. 

In combination with this launch, three new dot-com websites also went live. They market the newly organized scientific services of Wake Forest Innovations that are now available on a fee-for service basis. They are:

Preclinical Translational Services (www.WakePreclinical.com)

Core Laboratory Services (www.WakeCoreLabs.com)

Ultrasound Education (www.WakeUltrasoundEducation.com)

Download more information about WakeForest Innovations.

Download the news release.

New Tenants

Also announced today, three companies have located in, or are expanding their operations at, Innovation Quarter. AsInEx (www.asinex.com), a Russian medicinal chemistry company has decided – after consideration of alternative locations in the U.S. – to establish its North American operations in Winston-Salem. When AsInEx learned last fall that a number of medicinal chemists and a nice facility were available in Winston-Salem, this changed the dynamic and made Winston-Salem competitive with well-known drug discovery "hot beds" such as San Francisco and Boston. Coupled with lower costs and less traffic, Winston-Salem won out over a West Coast location.

Two start-ups, Blue Atom Technologies, Inc. provides innovative software tools designed to increase efficiencies and probability of success in chemical research and development, allowing Life Science companies to focus investment dollars on drug candidates with the highest potential of success. Biolucidation, LLC, (www.biolucidation.com) is a privately owned contract research firm that delivers non-clinical abuse liability testing services to Life Science institutions by uniquely blending academic insightfulness with the purpose and discipline of industry.

Download the full media kit.

 For high resolution versions of the thumbnail images below, please contact Media Relations at 336-716-4587.

Click to download high resolution photo. Click to download high resolution photo.
Eric Tomilinson, DSc, PhD, Chief Innovation Officer, declares Wake Forest Innovation Quarter is open for business. Dr. McConnell, CEO WFBMC, expresses confidence in the additional companies and jobs coming to the community thanks to Innovation Quarter.
   
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Allen Joines, Winston-Salem Mayor, states over half the biotech and IT jobs in NC are held by people with a two year technical degree. Daniel Cramer, Executive VP of Wexford, compares Wake Forest Innovation Quarter to the new model of university-based research parks.
   
Click to download high resolution photo.  
David Mounts, MBA, CEO Inmar, says  Innovation Quarter fits for his company and is Winston-Salem's future.  

  

 

 

 

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