Fracture Liaison Service

Factors Affecting Osteoporosis

Age: The older you get, the greater the risk.


Race: If you are white or of Asian descent.


Gender: One out of two women and one out of four men are likely to develop osteoporosis.


Family history: If someone in your family has had osteoporosis or a hip fracture.


Lifestyle: Inactive lifestyle.


Diet: A diet low in calcium and vitamin D.


Frame size: The smaller your frame, the greater your risk.


Certain medical conditions: Having type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis or inflammatory bowel disease.


Sex hormones: A reduction of hormones. In women, estrogen loss occurs primarily during and after menopause; in men, testosterone loss occurs gradually. A diet rich in calcium and vitamin D becomes particularly important during these years.


Smoking: Recent studies have shown a direct relationship between tobacco use and decreased bone density. In addition, most studies on the effects of smoking suggest that smoking increases the risk of having a fracture. Not all studies support these findings, but the evidence is mounting.


Eating disorders: Anorexia or bulimia.

Quick Reference

Orthopaedic Services
Appointments

New Patients 336-716-WAKE
Toll-Free 888-716-WAKE
Returning Patients
336-716-8200
Returning Pediatric Patients
336-716-8094

Contact the Department

Main 336-716-8200
Fax 336-716-8018

For assistance after hours, please call 336-716-2011 and ask for the Orthopaedic Surgeon on call.
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Last Updated: 07-28-2014
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Disclaimer: The information on this website is for general informational purposes only and SHOULD NOT be relied upon as a substitute for sound professional medical advice, evaluation or care from your physician or other qualified health care provider.