Pediatric Orthopaedics

What to Do At Home

In order to protect your back until your muscles become strong again,

You may:

  • Walk as much as possible. Begin at least 5 minutes per day, then add 5 minutes each day, up to 1 to 2 hours per day.
  • Get in and out of bed the way your nurses and therapists have shown you.
  • Sit in any chair.
  • Sleep in any bed.
  • Take sponge baths. DO NOT get your incision wet. If the doctor says it is okay, then you can take a shower letting the water spray your front. It is okay if some water gets on your incision, just don't rub. Pat your wound dry. The paper tape over your wound will peel up. Cut the parts of tape that are curling up, if they bother you. The tape may be pulled off 10 to 14 days after surgery. There also may be a stitch at either end of the incision (it looks like fishing line). You may trim this at the skin with a clean pair of scissors.
  • Ride in a car. Use shoulder/lap belt.
  • Take acetaminophen, Tylenol or any medication your doctor prescribes for you to take for pain.

You may NOT:

  • Bend or stoop to pick up any item. This includes making your bed.
  • Run or jump.
  • Lift anything over 5 to 10 pounds.
  • Play any sports until it is approved by your doctor.
  • Ride a bike, horse or go swimming until approved.
  • Drive a car.
  • Take medication with acetylsalicylic acid on the label such as Aspirin, Ibuprofen (Motrin, Aleve, Advil, etc.). These medications decrease bone healing.

Quick Reference

Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery
Appointments

New Patients 336-716-WAKE
Toll-free 888-716-WAKE
Returning Patients
336-716-8094

Contact the Department

Main 336-716-8200
Fax 336-716-8018

For assistance after hours, please call 336-716-2011 and ask for the Orthopaedic Surgeon on call.
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Last Updated: 04-11-2014
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Disclaimer: The information on this website is for general informational purposes only and SHOULD NOT be relied upon as a substitute for sound professional medical advice, evaluation or care from your physician or other qualified health care provider.