Joint Replacement

Is Surgery Necessary?

Major joints in the body are the hip, knee and shoulder. A joint is a special structure in the body where the ends of 2 or more bones meet. Cartilage covers the ends of the bones and "cushions" them for smooth, easy movement.

When a joint is diseased, such as with arthritis, the cartilage wears away. The bones become rough and grind together, causing pain and disability.

Examples of Joints Needing Repair

arthritic hip                    arthritic knee            

The main benefit of total joint replacement is pain relief. The decision to undergo surgery is a personal one. The patient and physician should discuss fully the procedure and all risks associated with it fully before reaching a decision.

An orthopaedic surgeon evaluates patients referred to the Joint Replacement Program. A history and physical are performed and a review of medical records and radiological studies is conducted.

Treatment recommendations are based upon findings and diagnosis, in conjunction with age, activity level, and medical history of the patient. Treatment may be surgical or non-surgical. Options are discussed with the patient as part of education and counseling by the orthopaedic surgeon.

Non-surgical treatment includes anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, and/or individually designed home exercise program.

 

Quick Reference

Orthopaedic Services
Appointments

New Patients 336-716-WAKE
Toll-Free 888-716-WAKE
Returning Patients
336-716-8200
Returning Pediatric Patients
336-716-8094

Contact the Department

Main 336-716-8200
Fax 336-716-8018

For assistance after hours, please call 336-716-2011 and ask for the Orthopaedic Surgeon on call.
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Last Updated: 04-10-2014
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Disclaimer: The information on this website is for general informational purposes only and SHOULD NOT be relied upon as a substitute for sound professional medical advice, evaluation or care from your physician or other qualified health care provider.