• Stroke Care

  • A stroke occurs when the supply of blood to the brain is blocked, so the brain does not get the oxygen and essential nutrients that it needs. There are three types of stroke: ischemic stroke (caused by a blocked blood vessel), hemorrhagic stroke (caused by a burst blood vessel in the brain) and transient ischemic attack (TIA), also known as a warning stroke.
     

    A stroke is a medical emergency that requires immediate attention, as rapid diagnosis and effective treatment can reduce the chance of negative complications and brain damage. Warning signs of a stroke include: sudden blurred or altered vision, weakness or numbness (usually on one side), difficulty speaking or understanding speech, dizziness and imbalance. It is important to recognize stroke signs early, call 911 and seek emergency treatment within three hours of the onset of symptoms. Learn more about stroke signs and symptoms.

    The graphs below show Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center’s performance in following best practices (evidence-based processes of care) and achieving the best results when treating stroke patients.

    A column with N/A indicates one of the following: we did not have enough eligible patients to report on that measure; CMS held the data for one or more quarters; results were unavailable for the reporting period; no cases met the criteria for the measure; or results could not be calculated for the reporting period.

  • Leg Blood Clot Prevention Given

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    Ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients have an increased chance of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE), or blood clots (most often in the leg veins) that break loose and travel to the lungs or brain. Prophylactic, or preventative, medications or tight-fitting stockings are given to at-risk patients to minimize the chance of blood clots forming in the veins. This chart shows the percent of stroke patients who were given VTE prophylaxis or have documentation explaining why they did not receive it the day of or after being admitted to the hospital.

  • Medicine for Irregular Heartbeat Prescribed

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    Ischemic stroke patients who have an irregular heartbeat (also known as atrial fibrillation/flutter) have an increased risk of having another stroke. An irregular heartbeat can cause blood to pool and clot in the heart. Taking an anticoagulant, or a blood-thinning medicine, is a preventative measure that blocks the formation of blood clots and reduces the chance of a second stroke. This chart shows the percent of ischemic stroke patients with irregular heartbeat who received a blood-thinner prescription before leaving the hospital.

  • Blood Clot Medicine Given by Day 2

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    Patients who have had an ischemic stroke have an increased chance of having another stroke while in the hospital. Blood-thinning medicines, called antithrombotic therapies, can prevent new blood clots form forming and reduce existing clots. To reduce the risk of a second stroke and other complications, it is important for patients to receive this medicine in a timely manner. This chart shows the percent of ischemic stroke patients who received this medicine within two days of being at the hospital.

  • Received Stroke Education

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    Education is a key part of stroke recovery for every patient and is critical for preventing the chance of another stroke or other health problems. It is important for patients to receive information about stroke care and prevention, including the warning signs of stroke, risk factors, and instructions on taking medication and follow-up medical care. Patients and caregivers should know to call 911 at the signs of a stroke. This chart shows the percent of stroke patients or caregivers who received written educational information about stroke care and prevention at the hospital.

  • Blood Clot Medicine Prescribed

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    Patients who have an ischemic stroke have an increased chance of having a future stroke. Antithrombotic therapies, or blood-thinning medications that prevent the growth and formation of blood clots, can minimize stroke complications and reduce the chance of a second stroke. This chart shows the percent of ischemic stroke patients who received a prescription for this medicine before leaving the hospital.

  • Clot-Busting Therapy Received Within 3 Hours

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    Thrombolytic therapies are important clot-busting medications used to treat ischemic stroke. Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) is an example of a powerful thrombolytic therapy that dissolves blood clots that cause strokes. This medicine is most effective when given to a patient within three hours after stroke symptoms begin. It may not be an appropriate therapy for all ischemic stroke patients. This chart shows the percent of ischemic stroke patients who went to the emergency department within two hours and received t-PA within three hours after stroke symptoms started.

  • Evaluated for Rehabilitation

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    A patient who has an ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke can have health complications that impair mobility, brain function, memory, speech and the ability to perform daily activities. Rehabilitation is an important part of the recovery process and the path to a healthier, longer life. After receiving stroke care, a patient can begin rehabilitation with trained health care professionals. This chart shows the percent of stroke patients who were evaluated for rehabilitation services at the hospital.

  • Cholesterol-Lowering Medicine Prescribed

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    Ischemic stroke patients often have high levels of LDL, or bad cholesterol. Although the body needs cholesterol, or fat, to function, too much LDL cholesterol is associated with an increased risk of heart disease and stroke. A statin is a medicine that can help decrease LDL cholesterol levels, reducing the chance for complications or future stroke. This measure shows the percent of ischemic stroke patients who received a prescription for cholesterol-lowering medicine before leaving the hospital.

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Disclaimer: The information on this website is for general informational purposes only and SHOULD NOT be relied upon as a substitute for sound professional medical advice, evaluation or care from your physician or other qualified health care provider.

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