Bailey Fearing

Bailey Fearing Photo 2010

Postdoctoral Fellow, Cartilage Mechanics and Tissue Engineering Lab
Lori Setton Laboratory, Duke University
Durham, NC

Year Matriculated: 
2008

Email: bvfearing@gmail.com

Education:

Molecular Medicine and Translational Sciences Graduate Program, Wake Forest School of Medicine; PhD 2014 

Guilford College; BS Biology and Health Sciences, 2007

Current Research:


Despite many promising research advances, outcomes after a spinal cord injury (SCI) remain poor. Much of the complications following a SCI are due to secondary damage. A new intervention being studied for SCI is use of a keratin biomaterial, which has previously been shown to have regenerative properties in the peripheral nervous system.  Keratins derived from human hair have been shown to improve Schwann cell activity via chemotaxis, increasing attachment and proliferation, and the upregulation of genes that contribute to the cell proliferation and differentiation. These findings suggest that a keratin biomaterial is neuroinductive in the peripheral nervous system and can facilitate an outcome similar to that seen using autograft repair. In a recent pilot study, this same keratin biomaterial was tested in a model of SCI with promising results. Higher survival, less inflammation, and better functional recovery was observed in keratin-treated subjects. It was proposed that the keratin treatment resulted in a mitigation of the inflammatory response.
In this study, we are examining the effect of keratin biomaterials on the functional and anatomical recovery following dorsal spinal cord partial transection. We have shown that keratin can improve some parameters of functional recovery following a SCI. Preliminary data suggests enhanced nerve regrowth, bladder function return, diminished cyst formation at the injury site, and a considerable restoration of stride properties with keratin treatment.  We hypothesize this observation is due to keratin’s immunomodulatory abilities. The goal of this project is to investigate the mechanism(s) by which keratin biomaterials may contribute to a decrease in secondary damage by mediating the inflammatory cell response. 

Awards:

1st place in the Integrative category at the Graduate Student and Post Doc Research Day held by Wake Forest University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, March 2013.

Honorable mention - Society for Biomaterials, Student STAR award, 2012-2013.

Poster Presentations:

WFIRM Annual Retreat, February 2012; Pinehurst, NC. A Keratin Biomaterial Promotes a Beneficial Inflammatory Response Following Spinal Cord Hemisection Injury.

US Army Institute for Surgical Research Symposium, San Antonio, TX. December 2011. A Keratin Biomaterial Promotes a Beneficial Inflammatory Response Following Spinal Cord Hemisection Injury

Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society Annual Meeting, Houston, TX. Decemeber 2011.  A Keratin Biomaterial Promotes a Beneficial Inflammatory Response Following Spinal Cord Hemisection Injury.

Bailey Fearing, Christopher Hartley, Orrin Dayton, Tamer AbouShwareb, Mark Van Dyke. Treatment of a Spinal Cord Hemitransection Injury with a Keratin Biomaterial. Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society(TERMIS)-NA Conference 2010; Orlando, FL

Bailey Fearing, Christopher Hartley, Orrin Dayton, Tamer AbouShwareb, Mark Van Dyke. Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury with Keratin Biomaterial Improves Survival and Recovery in Rats. Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES) Annual Meeting 2010; Austin, TX.

Bailey Fearing, Christopher Hartley, Orrin Dayton, Tamer AbouShwareb, Mark Van Dyke.  Survival and Functional Recovery in Spinal Cord Hemitransection Injury in Rats Treated with Keratin Biomaterial Hydrogel. WFU Graduate Student Research Day 2010; Winston-Salem, NC.

Changes in bladder function and histological morphology as a measure of the regenerative
properties of human-hair-derived keratin biomaterials following spinal cord hemitransection injury in the rat. Wake Forest University School of Medicine Medical Student Research Day, October 2009.

Presentations:

WFU Graduate Student Research Day, March 2012; Winston-Salem, NC. A Keratin Biomaterial Promotes a Beneficial Inflammatory Response Following Spinal Cord Hemisection Injury.

Treatment of a Spinal Cord Hemisection Injury with a Keratin-Based Hydrogel – Februrary 2011, Molecular Medicine and Translational Sciences Seminar Series.

Treatment of a Spinal Cord Hemitransection Injury with a Keratin Biomaterial – March 2010, Molecular Medicine Seminar Series; Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Research Update Seminar

Effects of Angiotensin-(1-7) on Radiation-Induced Microglial Proinflammatory Response – April 2009, Molecular Medicine Seminar Series

The Role of Wnt Signaling in Aging Adipose Derived Stem Cells – December 2008, Molecular Medicine Seminar Series.

Conference Abstracts:

First Author on accepted abstracts:

WFIRM Annual Retreat, February 2012; Pinehurst, NC.  A Keratin Biomaterial Promotes a Beneficial Inflammatory Response Following Spinal Cord Hemisection Injury.

WFU Graduate Student Research Day, March 2012; Winston-Salem, NC. A Keratin Biomaterial Promotes a Beneficial Inflammatory Response Following Spinal Cord Hemisection Injury.

Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society Annual Meeting, Houston, TX. Decemeber 2011.  A Keratin Biomaterial Promotes a Beneficial Inflammatory Response Following Spinal Cord Hemisection Injury.

 

Quick Reference

Contact Information
Molecular Medicine and Translational Science Graduate Program

Office 336-713-4259

Kay Collare

336-713-4259

kcollare@wakehealth.edu

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