Hematopathology

Overview

Hematopathology/Clinical Microscopy training is a multifaceted program designed to instruct the resident in the multi-modality methods used for detection, analysis, and measurement of hematologic specimens for interpretation and diagnosis of hematopoietic diseases/disorders. The overall curriculum consists of three specific educational/training components:

1. Program in Medical Laboratory Science

Program in Medical Laboratory Science is taken in the second year of residency as part of six month PMLS Course. The Hematology PMLS course includes a series of daily lectures, laboratory sessions, and examinations which focus on the subject of Hematology from a laboratory perspective. Areas of study include automated instrumentation, differential cell morphology, coagulation, hemoglobin/protein electrophoresis, urinalysis/body fluids. The Hematology PMLS course instructor is responsible for assigning specific educational/teaching responsibilities to the resident. The resident is expected to successfully complete the Hematology PMLS course and to be an active participant while in the course. Satisfactory completion of the hematology/clinical microscopy portions of the Program in Medical Laboratory Science course is required prior to beginning the core hematopathology rotations. See Program in Medical Laboratory Science for more detailed information.

2. Comprehensive Hematology Course

Four month didactic lecture series is given by the hematopathology fellows and faculty emphasizing the aspects of diagnosing hematological disorders. Areas of study include anemias, reactive leukocytic disorders, neoplastic hematology, bleeding/thrombotic disorders, and special ancillary diagnostic techniques. See attached Syllabus for more detailed information.

3. Core Hematopathology Rotation

Four months total in Surgical Hematopathology/Clinical Hematology Laboratories, with time spent within different laboratory sections, including:

  • Surgical Hematopathology - morphologic examination and interpretation of bone marrow aspirates/biopsies and lymph nodes, extranodal tissues, and integration/correlation of pertinent ancillary phenotypic and genotypic studies
  • Clinical Hematology Laboratory - performance/preparation and interpretation of bone marrow/peripheral blood staining for examination, and preparation and examination of body fluids, including urines, CSF, effusions, etc.
  • Flow Cytometry Laboratory - phenotypic analysis on clinical specimens for CD34 stem cell enumeration, CD4/CD8 T-cell enumeration, lymphoma/leukemia immunophenotyping, etc.
  • Special Hematology - performance/preparation and interpretation of procedures for hemoglobin electrophoresis, and serum/urine protein electrophoresis/immunofixation assays
  • Participation in daily and weekly hematopathology conferences

Duration

The required core Hematopathology rotation is four months, split into two two-month blocks during second, third, and/or fourth year residency, with a maximum of two residents per rotation. Additional time may be arranged at the approval of the Residency Program Director or the Rotation Director

Absence Policy: A maximum of one week’s absence per 2 month rotation (vacation or locum tenens time). Such time is to be approved by the Residency Program Director or Rotation Director prior to beginning the rotation.

Goals and Objectives

  • Understand the basis and diagnostic criteria for the classification scheme of hematopoietic disorders/neoplasms. Formulate differential diagnoses of hematopoietic disorders, through the correlation and interpretation and correlation of morphology, clinical data, and relevant phenotypic/genotypic ancillary studies. [Medical Knowledge]
  • Morphologic evaluation and interpretation of peripheral blood smears, body fluid preparations and bone marrow specimens (aspirate smears, aspirate clot, particle preparation and biopsy sections). Morphologic evaluation and interpretation of lymph node, spleen and thymic specimens and other extranodal specimens obtained for the evaluation of reactive and neoplastic hematopoietic disorders. [Patient Care, Medical Knowledge, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement]
  • Understand work-up of patients with anemia to include interpretation of hemoglobin electrophoresis, Heinz body stains, hemoglobin H stains, and osmotic fragility, etc. To be able to utilize this information in proposing laboratory test selection to establish diagnoses. [Patient Care, Medical Knowledge, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement]
  • Learn interpretation and diagnosis of immunophenotypic analysis of hematolymphoid malignancies, including immunohistochemistry technology, flow cytometry, and cytochemistry. Correlate data with histologic findings. Describe the decisions involved in antibody selection. [Patient Care, Medical Knowledge, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice]
  • Learn molecular diagnostic applications and interpretation of hematopoietic lesions, including PCR, in situ hybridization, conventional cytogenetics procedures, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Discuss the use of molecular assays in the diagnosis of hematolymphoid malignancies. Correlate data with histologic findings. Describe the decisions involved in test selection. [Patient Care, Medical Knowledge, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice]
  • Interpret hemoglobin electrophoresis, serum protein electrophoresis, and protein immunofixation assays. Become familiar with other tests, including plasma hemoglobin, serum viscosity, osmotic fragility, sickle solubility, and G6PD [Patient Care, Medical Knowledge, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement]
  • Understand work-up of patients with coagulopathies, including appropriate specimen collection and interpretation. Obtain proficiency/familiarity in interpretation with various coagulation procedures, including prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen determination, coagulation factor assays, coagulation factor inhibitor studies, fibrin-fibrinogen degradation product determination, bleeding time, platelet aggregation studies, and special molecular assays, etc. To be able to utilize this information in proposing laboratory test selection to establish diagnoses. [Patient Care, Medical Knowledge, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement]
  • Understand the principles, interpret the findings, and know the clinical significance of normal and abnormal results obtained on urine specimens. [Patient Care, Medical Knowledge, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement]
  • Understand importance of gathering and reviewing relevant previous pathologic studies and information for correlative review [Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement]
  • Make management/triage decisions regarding lymph node and/or extranodal biopsies for possible use in ancillary studies, including flow cytometry, cytogenetics, paraffin immunohistochemistry, molecular/genotypic analysis, and/or tissue culture as indicated [Patient Care, Medical Knowledge, Systems-Based Practice]
  • Develop the ability to write concise, informative and comprehensive reports on specimens submitted for examination; to develop communication/liaison skills to discuss pertinent findings with submitting physicians, pathologists, laboratory staff, and serve as an effective consultant with clinicians [Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Professionalism, Medical Knowledge, Systems-Based Practice]
  • Obtain current literature or information in the field of hematopathology [Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism]
  • Discuss issues of quality assurance and lab administration related to hematology laboratories. Be familiar with and participate in Quality Control, Automation/Instrument operation, LIS, and lab management. [Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice]
  • Demonstrate competence in the use of microscopic photography, including digital imaging technology through active participation and presentation in conferences. Recognize role as a important member of hematopathology diagnostic team and role as educator [Medical Knowledge, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Interpersonal and Communication Skills]

Resident Responsibilities

Orientation to service: On the first day of the rotation, the resident will meet with the on-service hematopathology attending and/or hematopathology fellow for orientation and to establish a detailed schedule. New residents on this rotation will be given approximately two (2) weeks to familiarize themselves with the operation and routine of the section.

The resident will rotate through each of the laboratory sections in such variable time as required to develop proficiency in the above goals and objectives, with graduated responsibilities to include unsupervised, independent work in the lab sections. A typical rotation will include hands-on performance and interpretation experience in the following areas:

1. Surgical Hematopathology

Over the course of the Core Hematopathology rotation the resident participates in the evaluation and sign-out of adult and pediatric hematopoietic disorders, which includes correlating peripheral blood data, marrow aspirate smears, trephine core biopsies/clot sections, nodal/extranodal tissues, as well as any/all relevant phenotypic/genotypic ancillary studies, including flow cytometry, cytochemical and immunohistochemical stains, molecular/cytogenetic studies. In addition, the resident is responsible for gathering and reviewing relevant previous pathologic studies and information from patient’s medical record.

All studies are reviewed in detail and final sign-out of cases will be done with the attending hematopathologist at a multi-headed microscope, correlating the relevant clinical and biological features into a final diagnosis. As graduated responsibility, the resident is required for dictation of the final report, with appropriate levels of guidance from the attending physician, and is expected to work nearly independently by the end of rotation training. The resident is also responsible for contacting the appropriate submitting clinician, and communicating unexpected or urgent results. The resident will ultimately be able to discuss the pertinent findings with the submitting physician, and to serve as an effective consultant.

Specific activities include:

  • Learning/practicing indications, principles, logistics, and general operation procedures for processing/triaging surgical hematopoietic samples
  • Morphologic examination of marrow aspirate slides, biopsy touch preps, peripheral blood smears, and trephine core biopsies
  • Morphologic examination of lymph node biopsies and other lymphoreticular specimens
  • Correlation with clinical presentations/features
  • Diagnostic/interpretation and correlation with phenotypic analyses, including cytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry
  • Diagnostic/interpretation and correlation with genotypic analyses, including PCR, in situ hybridization, FISH, cytogenetics/karyotypic analysis at daily Cytogenetics Sign-Out
  • Schedule meeting for daily sign-out/rounds with faculty for case reviews
  • Formation of final integrative written report, including benign or malignant bone marrow and lymphoid specimens, in a timely manner (to be completed on the day the specimen is received) and pass the completed report to the attending pathologist. All pertinent laboratory data, including CBCs, flow cytometry results and special stains should be used in generating this provisional report. The attending staff pathologist will review each case with the resident via a multi-headed microscope, or give immediate follow-up on any disagreements in the resident’s provisional report and the final report.
  • Liaison and consultation with other pathology or clinical services, e.g. Cytopathology, Hematology/Oncology, etc.

2. Hematology Laboratory

The resident will learn the basic principles and operation of a general hematology laboratory. While in the general hematology laboratory, the resident will be required to assist in the marrow aspirate slides and biopsy touch preparations, stain samples, and participate in trouble shooting/triaging when less than optimal material is obtained. The resident will be instructed in basic and advanced morphology of marrow and peripheral blood, and perform differential counts. The resident will identify normal and abnormal blood cells/features, and assess WBC, RBC, and platelet morphology on a daily basis.

Urinalysis and medical microscopy training for residents is part of the rotation in the MT course in which the residents receive specific hands on training and expertise including urine physical characteristics, urine chemical tests, aminoacidurias, and urine sediment. Practice case studies are used in addition. Other areas of study include standard dip-stick urinalysis testing as well as automated urinalysis instrumentation. Medical microscopy for cellular morphology and crystal and cast identification is studied. Medical microscopy of cerebrospinal, pleural, peritoneal, synovial and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens is covered. The resident is expected to be available for consultation during the day, i.e., interpretation of morphologic findings, and issue a referral report form. Abnormal and unusual microscopy findings and all BALs are referred to cytology.

Other tests the trainee will become familiar with include plasma hemoglobin, serum viscosity, osmotic fragility, sickle solubility, and G6PD. The resident will help to process patient samples from start to finish using automated cell counters and integrated/interfaced laboratory computer systems, and learns principles of procedure, reagents, equipment, and materials.

Specific activities include:

  • Learning indications, principles, logistics, and general operation procedures for laboratory reagents and equipment in processing hematologic samples
  • Preparing of marrow aspirate slides, biopsy touch preps, peripheral blood smears, and body fluids
  • Performing bone marrow (500 cell count) and peripheral blood (100 cell count) differentials
  • Processing and interpreting other special hematologic work-ups, e.g. serum viscosity, osmotic fragility, sickle solubility, G6PD, etc.
  • Processing and interpreting urinalysis and medical microscopy of cerebrospinal, pleural, peritoneal, synovial and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens.

3. Flow Cytometry

The resident spends time while rotating through the flow cytometry laboratory to learn the basic principles and operation of the flow laboratory. The resident uses the first experience of the rotation to follow at least one specimen of each type from accession, through specimen preparation, cell staining, acquisition on the flow cytometer, results analysis, interpretation of results and report generation. Practical points such as pitfalls vs. advantages, direct versus indirect staining, whole blood lysis vs. gradient separation, quality control, gating practices, and computer analysis are all discussed.

On every day of the rotation, the resident is responsible for reviewing the histograms and slides on all leukemia/lymphoma or other hematologic cases, completing the write-up sheet and presenting the case to the attending hematopathologist. The resident will be expected to communicate the results to the submitting physician and correlate the flow cytometry findings with other studies available for review, e.g. paraffin section, cytogenetics, and molecular diagnostics.

Specific activities include:

  • Reviewing the histograms and slides on all current /pending leukemia and lymphoma cases
  • Completing the write-up sheet and presenting the case to the pathologist. The resident is involved in result reporting under the supervision of the attending physicians and lab directors in each section. The resident will participate in, but is not primarily responsible for, interpretation and sign-out of final patient reports under the supervision of the attending hematopathologist
  • Report and communicate the results to the submitting physician, with other pathology or clinical services, e.g. Cytopathology, Hematology/Oncology, etc.
  • In addition to the routine, daily, clinical work research projects are available.

4. Special Clinical Chemistry/Hematology

The rotation in the Specialty Hematology Section includes instruction in serum and urine protein electrophoresis, immunofixations, and hemoglobin gel electrophoresis, including both acetate and agar electrophoresis procedures. The resident will learn correlation and integration with CBC data, peripheral blood smear morphology, clinical features, and other relevant laboratory data (direct antiglobulin test, reticulocyte counts, serum heptoglobin, serum bilirubin, etc.) to arrive at a diagnosis.

Specific activities include:

  • Performance/preparation and interpretation of procedures for hemoglobin electrophoresis, and serum/urine protein electrophoresis/immunofixation assays
  • Written/result reporting under the supervision of the attending physicians. The resident will participate in, but is not primarily responsible for, interpretation and sign-out of final patient reports under the supervision of the attending hematopathologist
  • The resident will be expected to report and communicate the results to the submitting physician.

5. Concurrent activities

a. Conference attendance/presentations

  • Bone Marrow Rounds - daily.The resident attends these daily clinicopathologic correlation conferences while on general surgical hematopathology rotation. Marrow Rounds are a primary didactic specialty-specific conference performed at a multi-headed microscope, held in conjunction with the clinical hematology team to review all current bone marrow specimens. The rounds allow the resident to interact with the clinical hematology team on a daily basis. Topics include case-relevant pathobiologic features, treatment and therapeutic options, prognostic factors, etc., with both attending hematopathologist and attending clinical hematologist. The resident participates in teaching of fellows, junior residents, medical students, in morphologic evaluation and interpretation of peripheral blood smears and bone marrow specimens.
  • Cytogenetics Sign-Out - daily.The resident attends and participates in the daily cytogenetics and molecular genetics sign-out of current hematopoietic malignancies, including acute/chronic leukemia, myeloproliferative neoplasms, myelodysplastic disorders, and lymphoproliferative disorders. Topics of discussion principally relate to correlating cytogenetic and molecular data with all case work-ups as part of a multi-modality diagnostic approach.
  • Hematology/Oncology Case Conference - 2nd/4th Wednesday of month.The resident attends and participates in this bi-monthly case-based interdisciplinary conference held in conjunction with the Section on Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, in which the residents/fellows present and discusses morphologic features, pertinent laboratory findings, and diagnostic interpretations of cases. This is a graduated responsibility, and cases (one or more) are designated by the hematopathology fellow as the resident acquires more experience, typically during the second rotation. The resident is responsible for photography using digital camera apparatus, review of appropriate diagnostic materials, and presenting cases using slide projection or digital presentation formats.
  • Hematopathology Consensus Conference - 3rd Wednesday of month.This is a monthly intradepartmental case conference held by attending hematopathologist(s) involving the entire Hematopathology Section, attendings, fellows, and residents. Discussion involves presentation of cases posing problematic or difficult diagnosis, cases representing particularly atypical or typical pathologic characteristics, and/or any case of interest. Residents may present current cases, with varying degrees of difficulty depending on level of training/experience in advance of the conference. The resident is responsible for higher-level contributions in case discussions, including review of relevant/current literature on the topic, review of pertinent pathology materials, including previous pathology and ancillary studies, be knowledgeable about clinical and laboratory findings, and be able to discuss diagnostic interpretations.

b.Laboratory Quality Assurance/Improvement

  • Review/interpretation of abnormal laboratory reports, i.e. "Path Box Referral Forms" in the Core Hematology Laboratory. As part of required resident participation in laboratory Quality Assurance programs, the resident is responsible for reviewing, interpreting, and sign-out of daily abnormal laboratory reports, with completion of Path Box Referral Form, in accordance with the Hematopathology/Clinical Microscopy criteria/guidelines in the Resident Reference Manual.
  • This duty is shared with the pathology house officer on call
  • Weekdays, 8 AM - 5 PM: Hematopathology resident
  • All other times: Resident on call

This is a graduated responsibility, as junior residents may need assistance or consultation with hematopathology fellow and/or attendings. Any cases not resolved are brought to the attention of the hematopathology fellow/attending pathologist for presentation and discussion typically at a multi-headed microscope. This review of problem slides often includes body fluid slides such as CSF, joint fluids and urine, and HbF by the Kleihauer-Betke staining method.

  • Participation in CAP surveys and/or laboratory inspection

c. Bone Marrow Biopsy/Aspirate Training

As part of their hematopathology training, residents are required to perform bone marrow biopsy and aspiration procedures on a minimum of five patients. This training experience is provided and directed by the hematology/oncology division of the Department of Internal Medicine.

  • Residents assigned to the hematopathology rotation will carry the assigned pager so they can respond immediately to notification from the hematology/oncology attending that a bone marrow biopsy/aspiration is about to be performed. The pager designated for this purpose is 806-9018. This beeper should not be used for any purpose other than coverage of the biopsy/aspiration on-call function.
  • The process usually involves initial training with an intraoperative marrow harvest on an anesthetized patient or donor, followed subsequently by diagnostic biopsy/aspirate procedures on patients in the clinics or hospital beds. The hematopathology resident should reply immediately to the page and report promptly to the patient’s location in order to avoid delays in the procedure.
  • If the hematopathology resident is not available or has completed the minimum requirements, the beeper must be passed to another resident or to the Chief Residents so that another house officer can respond immediately to notifications from the clinical hematology/oncology staff. Failure to respond immediately to a page results in delays in patient care.
  • Residents who have completed their hematopathology rotation but have not performed the required minimum of five biopsy/aspirates will be assigned by the Chief Residents to carry the beeper or otherwise ensure they complete the required number of procedures prior to the end of their training program at WFBMC.
  • The hematopathology residents and Chief Residents should coordinate this on-call process with the hematopathology fellow in order to ensure that all parties obtain the biopsy/aspirate experiences required by the ACGME.
  • Residents must record the details of all biopsy/aspirates they perform as part of their ACGME Case Log record of required procedures. 

d. Self Study/Teaching 

  • The resident is expected to utilize the extensive reference materials available in the section, including standard clinical pathology, hematology and coagulation reference books. In addition there are numerous supplementary textbooks, web-based materials, extensive slide study sets, ASCP CheckSample and CheckPath case studies, and CAP cases available for self-study.
  • During the rotation the resident will able to perform pertinent/topical literature reviews, and review current laboratory hematology journals and clinical pathology journals. Additional reading materials on specific topics can be obtained from the attendings.
  • Participate in the instruction of rotating medical students, residents, and other clinical fellows

6. Optional activities

  • Coagulation and thrombopathies - rounds with a clinical hematologist with expertise in coagulopathies and thrombopathies, as well as the laboratory tests utilized in their diagnoses, is a requirement of the Blood Bank rotation (see the objectives of that section), however, additional time may be given during the core hematopathology rotations at the discretion of the director or attending hematopathologist.
  • Research - develop specific project, including case report, abstract, or paper for publication
  • The resident may be involved in the screening and implementation of new techniques or methods introduced into the surgical hematopathology service for diagnostic or research purposes.

7. Graduated Responsibilities

The resident will, over the course of training from 1st rotation to 2nd rotation, assume progressive levels of graduated responsibilities. The residents will be assigned graded service responsibilities based on the individual’s performance. Expectations/duties for residents will include increase caseload work-ups, increased conference participation and presentation, as well as unsupervised, independent work in the Core Hematology Laboratories.

Specific activities include:

  • Residents in 1st rotation will be given limited caseload (1-2 cases/day), while residents in 2nd rotation will be expected to carry more caseload burden, 3 or more per day.
  • As training progresses, the fellow will be expected to make management/triage decisions regarding lymph node biopsies, as well as a wide variety of extranodal lymphoreticular lesions.
  • Full participation and presentation in conferences is required by 2nd rotation.
  • Residents returning to specific laboratory areas for further training during their fourth year are expected to assume a higher level of responsibility in the laboratory, including more hands on experience with specimen preparation, cell staining, data acquisition, results analysis, interpretation of results and report generation.
  • The senior resident is expected to provide increased consultation, supervision, and liaison with laboratory medical technologists and junior residents to provide guidance with respect to reviewing, interpreting, and sign-out of daily abnormal laboratory reports.

Resources

Reading Materials

Carstens KS, et al. Introduction to High Resolution Protein Electrophoresis and Associated Techniques. Helena Laboratories Inc., Beaumont, TX. 1986.
Coleman, WB. Molecular Diagnostics for the Clinical Laboratorian, 2nd Edition. Human Press. 2006.
Colman RW, et al. Hemostasis and Thrombosis: Basic Principles and Clinical Practice, 5th Edition. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore. 2006.
Glassy, EF. Color Atlas of Hematology: An Illustrated Field Guide Based on Proficiency Testing. CAP Press, Northfield, IL. 1998.
Goodnight SH and Hathaway WE. Disorders of Hemostasis and Thrombosis: A Clinical Guide, 2nd edition. McGraw-Hill, Inc., New York. 2001.
Greer JP, et al (ed). Wintrobe's Clinical Hematology, 12th edition. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore. 2008.
Gulati G and Caro J. Blood Cells: An Atlas of Morphology with Clinical Relevance. ASCP Press, Chicago. 2007.
Helm, S. and Mitelman, F. Cancer Cvtogenetics, 2nd Edition. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1995.
Henry JB (ed). Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods, 21st edition. W.B. Saunders. 2006.
Hodgson, S. V. and Maker, E. R. A Practical Guide to Human Cancer Genetics. Cambridge. 1993.
Hoffman R, et al. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice, 4th edition. Elsevier Inc., Phildelphia. 2005.
Hoyer JD, Kroft SH (ed). Color Atlas of Hemoglobin Disorders: A Compendium Based on Proficiency Testing. CAP Press, Northfield, IL. 2003.
Jaffe ES, et al (ed). Hematopathology. Elsevier Inc., Phildelphia. 2010
Keren DF, McCoy JP, Carey JL. Flow Cytometry in Clinical Diagnosis, 3rd edition. ASCP Press, Chicago. 2001.
Kjeldsberg C, et al. Practical Diagnosis of Hematologic Disorders, 5th edition. ASCP Press, Chicago. 2010.
Kjeldsberg C, Joseph Knight J. Body Fluids, 3rd Edition. ASCP Press, Chicago. 1993.
McPherson RA and Pincus MR (ed). Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods, 21st edition. Saunders Elsevier, Inc. 2007.
Nguyen DT, Diamond LW, Braylan RC. Flow Cytometry in Hematopathology: A Visual Approach to Data Analysis and Interpretation. Human Press, Totowa, NJ. 2003.
O'Connor BH. Color Atlas and Instruction Manual of Peripheral Blood Cell Morphology. Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore. 1984.
Sun, T. Flow Cytometry Analysis of Hematologic Neoplasms: A Color Atlas and Text, 2nd edition. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Philadelphia. 2002.
Swerdlow S, et al (ed). Pathology and Genetics Tumours of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. WHO Classification of Tumours. IARC Press, Lyon, France. 2008.

• Electronic:
A large list of flow cytometry resources, including the Flow cytometry E-mail user group, maintained by Purdue University: http://www.cyto.purdue.edu/index.htm
Johns Hopkins University flow cytometry online tutorial: http://162.129.103.34/leuk/toc.htm
WFBMC flow cytometry online tutorial: http://intranet.wfubmc.edu/pathology/teaching/hempath/flow_cytometry/index.html
Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology:
http://www.infobiogen.fr/services/chromcancer/
Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=OMIM

• Study Sets - extensive case library has been established and maintained with original case data and pertinent patient history. These collections are an excellent resource for adjunctive teaching as well as an outstanding study material.
All diagnostic material including glass slides & reports of bone marrow and lymph node material, archived since the 1950s, are available for review
Flow Cytometry case folders
Detailed volume Glass Slide Study Set with approximately 1000 slides
Hemoglobin and serum/urine protein electrophoreses, immuno fixations
ASCP CheckSample Case Series in Hematology, 2003 - present
ASCP CheckPath Slide Series in Hematopathology, 2010 - present
CAP Surveys
Study sets from Society for Hematopathology workshops, each containing microscopic slides (+/- 100) with accompanying clinical data, panel lists diagnoses, and discussion notes.
Hematology RISE examination practice questions
Platelet aggregation study sets

Evaluation

Resident
The resident will be evaluated by the rotation faculty and Hematopathology Fellows. Methods of evaluation may include 360 evaluations by clinical laboratory staff, "on-the-fly" spot evaluations, oral/written/unknown case work-ups, and written documentation of activities including procedure/case log and conference presentations. Resident assessment will be based on performance in the following areas:

  • Daily morphology sign-out/rounds
  • Daily review of written provisional reports
  • Assistance and availability to the attending hematopathologists

Faculty/Rotation
At the completion of each rotation, the resident will be given the opportunity to evaluate the rotation and the faculty.

Faculty/Staff

Michael W. Beaty, M.D. (Director of Hematopathology)
David D. Grier, M.D. (Director of Flow Cytometry)
Changlee S. Pang, M.D. (Hematopathology) 
Mark Pettenati, Ph.D., FACMG (Director of Cytogenetics)
John Owen, M.D. (Director of Coagulation Laboratory)
Mary Ann Knovich, M.D. (Clinical Hematology)
Jennifer Moorefield, MT ASCP, Hematology Specialist (Coagulation)
Natalie Walker, MT ASCP, Hematology Specialist (Flow Cytometry)
Jane Propst, MT ASCP, Hematology Specialist (Bone Marrow)
LuAnn Mascorro, MT ASCP (Hematology Instructor, Medical Technology Course)

Quick Reference

Pathology Residency Training Program
Program Director:
Ryan T. Mott, MD

Tel: 336-716-4311
Fax: 336-716-7595

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center
Medical Center Boulevard
Winston-Salem, NC 27157
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Last Updated: 03-14-2014
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