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Women's Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS)

Download Dr. Espeland's comments on the study.Mark Espeland, Ph.D., professor biostatistical sciences in the Public Health Sciences division at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, discusses findings from new research he and colleagues conducted that found postmenopausal hormone therapy with conjugated equine estrogens (CEEs) was not associated with overall sustained benefit or risk to cognitive function when given to women ages 50 to 55 years.

The Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study of Younger Women (WHIMSY) tested whether prescribing CEE-based hormone therapy to postmenopausal women ages 50 to 55 years had longer-term effects on cognitive function. WHIMSY is part of the groundbreaking Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS) that demonstrated that postmenopausal hormone therapy with CEEs, when prescribed to women 65 years and older, caused deficits in global and domain-specific cognitive functioning.

The findings are published Online First by JAMA Internal Medicine, a JAMA Network publication. 

Download Dr. Espeland's comments on the study.


National Institute of Medicine Sodium Report

Download Dr. Ard’s comments on the studyDr. Jamy Ard, associate professor of epidemiology and prevention and co-director of the Weight Management Center at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, was one of 12 members of a national committee who reviewed the data for the Institute of Medicine’s report on Sodium Intake in Populations: Assessment of Evidence released today. The report examines links between sodium consumption and health outcomes and supports recommendations to lower sodium intake from the very high levels some Americans now consume. Evidence from this report does not support reduction in sodium intake to below 2,300 mg per day, according to the Institute of Medicine, part of the NIH.  

Download Dr. Ard’s comments on the study.


Scientists Develop New Way to Measure Cumulative Effect of Head Hits in Football

Download Dr. Stitzel's comments about the study.Scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have developed a new way to measure the cumulative effect of impacts to the head incurred by football players.

The metric, called Risk Weighted Cumulative Exposure (RWE), can capture players’ exposure to the risk of concussion over the course of a football season by measuring the frequency and magnitude of all impacts, said senior author of the study Joel Stitzel, Ph.D., chair of biomedical engineering at Wake Forest Baptist and associate head of the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences.

The study is published in the current online edition of the Annals of Biomedical Engineering.

Download Dr. Stitzel's comments on the study


Match Day 2013

Match Day 2013

On March 15, 2013, seniors at Wake Forest School of Medicine learned where they will begin their careers as doctors in the annual Match Day event. Every year graduating medical students across the country simultaneously open envelopes to learn where they “matched” and will spend the next three to seven years of residency training. It’s a tradition that is followed only by medical schools and has occurred for 61 years.

This year 124 Wake Forest medical students, 62 men and 62 women, matched in 25 specialties.

The medical students at Wake Forest were among the more than 40,000 applicants who sought residency positions through the national residency program this year, making this the largest Match in history, according to the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). NRMP is a private, not-for-profit corporation established in 1952 to provide a uniform date of appointment to positions in graduate medical education (GME) in the United States.

Download high resolution video of Wake Forest’s Match Day 2013 celebration.

Download web resolution video of Wake Forest’s Match Day 2013

For additional information on Wake Forest School of Medicine.

For additional information on the national Match program.

What are the specialties “matched” by Wake Forest medical students?

 

Anesthesiology - 10
Child Neurology - 1
Emergency Medicine - 10
Family Medicine - 10
Internal Medicine - 26
Internal Medicine/Primary - 3
Medicine/Pediatrics - 1
Neurology - 3
Neurosurgery - 2
OBGYN - 2
Ophthalmology - 2
Orthopaedics - 3
Otolaryngology - 4
 Pathology - 4
Pediatrics - 13
Pediatrics/Primary - 1
Pediatrics/Research – 1
Psychiatry – 3
Rehab Medicine – 1
Radiology – 3
Radiation Oncology – 1
Surgery – 9
Surgery Preliminary – 8
Transitional – 2
Urology - 1

 


ACC Mascots Visit Brenner Children's Hospital

ACC Mascots Visit Brenner Children's HospitalThe mascots of the Atlantic Coast Conference spent Thursday afternoon at Brenner Children’s Hospital, part of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. They stopped by as part of an outreach initiative for the 2013 ACC Men’s Basketball Tournament. Young patients got to meet and have their photo taken with their favorite mascot during the visit. Brenner Children’s Hospital is the pediatric arm of Wake Forest Baptist. It is the only children's hospital in northwest North Carolina serving western North Carolina, as well as parts of Virginia, South Carolina, and Tennessee. More than 4,500 children are admitted to Brenner Children's Hospital each year. In addition, more than 21,000 pediatric subspecialty visits occur annually at the hospital-based outpatient clinics.

Download a high resolution/broadcast ready video.


Wake Forest Baptist Marks 20th Anniversary of Star Lighting at Annual Ceremony

 A fixture of the Winston-Salem skyline, the star shines atop Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center for the 20th year.

Perched 12 stories up on top of the roof of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, a 31-foot Moravian star, one of the largest in the world, will usher in the holiday season for the 20th year.

"We really didn't know how much it mattered until one year we had it lit and the star went out," said Mike Cheek, electrical section manager at Wake Forest Baptist, "and we received so many phone calls wondering why the star was not on. So, we know it means a lot to the community and the facility."

Download the complete news release  

Download video about history and assembly of the star with music background or without music background.

Download a time-lapse video of the nearly eight hour process to put together the 3,400-pound star.

Media is invited to attend the annual Christmas star lighting and worship service which will be held Monday, Nov. 26, from 5:45 p.m. to 6:15 p.m. The service, which is free and open to the public, will be held on the top level of Wake Forest Baptist's Eden Terrace parking deck off Hawthorne Road.

For more information contact Mac Ingraham, mingraha@wakehealth.edu, (336) 716-3487 or Main Number (336) 716-4587. 

Click on the individual images below to download high resolution photographs.
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Staff members place the star's 27 points on the roof in order of assembly. Electrician Jamie Reece walks on the edge of the skyline to ready the star's assembly.
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A team of technicians anchors the first point in place. Each technician knows his role as the second point is secured.
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Having waited for a calm day, two team members carry one of the points across the roof. The technicians take a top-down approach to assembling the star.
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Covering the star's base - the 27th point - is the final step in putting together the 31-foot star. A fixture of the Winston-Salem skyline, the star shines atop Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center for the 20th year. 

Research in Spider-Man Movie Similar to Actual Science

But Real-Life Researchers Use Safer Methods to Grow Body Parts

In the new Spider-Man movie, scientists delve into the field of regenerative medicine as they work to re-grow a human limb. Koudy Williams, D.V.M., a self-described “Spider-Man geek” and real-life regenerative medicine researcher, says the movie’s plot isn’t as far-fetched as some people might think.

“We’re working on long-term projects to regenerate fingers and limbs,” says Williams, a professor at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center’s Institute for Regenerative Medicine. “But we have safer ways to do it than the researchers in Spider-Man.”

Download the complete news release

Download interview video and Regenerative Medicine B-roll

Download audio of interview with Williams

Download high-resolution photos of regenerative medicine research at Wake Forest Baptist (below)

Williams is available for individual broadcast interviews via our studio (fiber to satellite uplink) on Wednesday, July 25. To arrange an interview, contact Karen Richardson, krchrdsn@wakehealth.edu, (336) 716-4453 or Main Number (336) 716-4587.

Click on the individual images below to download high resolution photographs.
 
Bladders engineered in the lab were first implanted in patients more than 13 years ago. Urine tubes engineered in the lab were successfully implanted in five young boys.
Bladders engineered in the lab were first implanted in patients more than 13 years ago. Urine tubes engineered in the lab were successfully implanted in five young boys.
   
 A device in the lab shoots out a spider-web-looking material that is caught on a spinning rod. The resulting tubular shapes are used to engineer blood vessels. One of the most recent technologies is a 3-D printer designed to print cells – and the biomaterials that hold them together – into organ and tissue prototypes.
A device in the lab shoots out a spider-web-looking material that is caught on a spinning rod. The resulting tubular shapes are used to engineer blood vessels. One of the most recent technologies is a 3-D printer designed to print cells – and the biomaterials that hold them together – into organ and tissue prototypes.
   
3-D printing projects under way at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine include prototype kidneys, finger bone and ears.  
3-D printing projects under way at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine include prototype kidneys, finger bone and ears.  

Vice President Biden Speaks at Wake Forest Biotech Place

 Download video of Vice President Biden Speaking at Wake Forest Biotech Place
 Download video of Vice President Biden speaking at Wake Forest Biotech Place
(file size 368MB)

Vice President Joe Biden today praised Wake Forest Biotech Place as a shining example of scientific innovation serving as a locus for the new biotechnology-based economy in Winston-Salem.

Biotech Place, a part of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, is a state-of-the-art biotechnology research and innovation center and the sixth building Wake Forest Baptist has opened in the growing Piedmont Triad Research Park.

Speaking to a crowd of 600, Biden hailed those in the audience as "fighters," referring to the city's vision and ability to shift from an economy built on tobacco and textiles to one based on medical innovation and research.

"The people of North Carolina are fighters," Biden said. "The American people are fighters. That's why I'm so optimistic, even in these tough times." During an official visit to Winston-Salem, Biden devoted most of his speech to the Obama administration's efforts to create jobs and boost the economy for the middle class.  

Biden was welcomed by Jan Wagner, D.V.M., Ph.D., vice president and senior associate dean for research at Wake Forest Baptist, and Graydon Pleasants, Piedmont Triad Research Park administrator.

The vice president's speech was preceded by remarks from Winston-Salem Mayor Allen Joines and Phil Shugart, president of Carolina Liquid Chemistries, a tenant of Wake Forest Biotech Place and success story that began with two employees in a Wake Forest incubator and is now a company of 70 employees nationwide.

Wake Forest Baptist is driving the redevelopment and economic revitalization of a large section on the eastern edge of downtown Winston-Salem. The latest evidence of this development is Biotech Place.

The new research building is a world-class 242,000 square foot historic structure comprised of two former R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. warehouses that have been redeveloped into a modern biotech research laboratory where internationally renowned Wake Forest Baptist researchers are pioneering new fields of medicine discovering tomorrow's treatments today.

Wake Forest Baptist is Biotech Places's largest tenant and includes the Departments of Physiology/Pharmacology, Biomedical Engineering, Immunology and Microbiology, the Childress Institute for Pediatric Trauma and the Piedmont Triad Research Park offices.

Download Vice President Biden at Wake Forest Biotech Place Photos

Click on the individual images below to download high resolution photographs.
 
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Match Day 2012

 Download video of WFSM Match Day 2012
 

Download video of WFSM Match Day 2012
(file size 577MB)

On March 16, 2012, seniors at Wake Forest School of Medicine learned where they will begin their careers as doctors in the annual Match Day event. Every year graduating medical students across the country open envelopes to learn where they “matched” and will spend the next three to seven years of residency training. It’s a tradition that is followed only by medical schools and has occurred for the past 60 years.

This year 113 Wake Forest medical students, 70 men and 43 women, matched in 15 specialties.

The medical students at Wake Forest were among the more than 38,377 applicants who sought residency positions through the national residency program this year, making this the largest Match in history, according to the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). NRMP is a private, not-for-profit corporation established in 1952 to provide a uniform date of appointment to positions in graduate medical education (GME) in the United States.


The Battelle Report

Battelle Report Cover Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center delivers extensive economic benefits locally, regionally and statewide and is accelerating growth of the nation’s scientific base of knowledge, innovation and technology, according to an in-depth economic analysis by Battelle Memorial Institute. The report by the world’s largest, nonprofit, independent research and development organization details the many social and economic contributions by Wake Forest Baptist.

 

Downloadable Photos
(Click for Larger)
  
SE021312-032_150.jpg   02/13/2012; John D. McConnell, MD, CEO, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center addresses media and Winston-Salem business leaders. The Battelle Memorial Institute was commissioned to analyze the medical center’s economic impact in Forsyth County, the service area and North Carolina.
   
SE021312-039_150.jpg   02/13/2012: Simon J. Tripp, Senior Director of Battelle Memorial Institute’s Technology Partnership Practice, provides a detailed analysis of the report’s findings to members of the media.
   
SE021312-077_150.jpg   02/13/2012: McConnell and Tripp field questions from local media during the news conference on Monday, February 13, 2012.

 

 

 

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About the Rebranding

Wake Forest Baptist unveils its new brand identity, including a new name, logo and visual identity. The public-facing name that consumers and the public will see throughout the region is Wake Forest Baptist Health.

Last Updated: 03-17-2014
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