Heart Center

The Heart Center at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center is a national leader in cardiovascular care, surgery and collaborative research. Recognized for the highest standards of care by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the National Cardiovascular Data Registry®, the Heart Center specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of heart and vascular disease, including cardiovascular imaging, valve repair and replacement, bypass surgery, pediatric procedures and device placement.

Heart Center Research Expertise 

Heart Center researchers are actively involved in multicenter studies exploring new therapies and preventative measures for cardiovascular disease. Professor of Cardiology David M. Herrington, MD, MHS, recently received an $8.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to examine genetic variants associated with premature development of atherosclerosis.

Current Heart Center research initiatives also examine:

  • Vascular stents
  • Genetic markers leading to the prevention of heart disease
  • Treatments for atrial fibrillation
  • The impact of obesity on heart disease
  • The repair of congenital defects
  • Imaging to predict and prevent future cardiovascular events

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) 

Heart Center surgeons are pioneering innovative options for patients in need of heart valve replacement and other cardiovascular procedures. Wake Forest Baptist Health is participating in the Medtronic CoreValve® U.S. clinical study to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a new percutaneous technology that enables aortic valve replacement without traditional open-heart surgery.

Leaders in Transradial Cardiac Catheterization 

Wake Forest Baptist's Heart Center performs 70 percent of its catheterization procedures through the radial artery, totaling more than 2,000 procedures each year.  This advanced treatment option results in lower rates of bleeding, bruising and other complications than traditional catheterization.

 

 

Find A Doctor Ways to Give

Spotlight

Patient Jim Pepper

“I had heart trouble and didn’t know it.”

Jim Pepper considers it fortuitous that he participated in a research study at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

Genetics and Genes

Genetics and Genes

The end-stage result from atherosclerotic heart disease  is congestive heart failure, a condition that afflicts more than five million Americans. Cardiologists at Wake Forest Baptist are helping to develop novel therapies to deal with this devastating disease.

Last Updated: 01-16-2014
USNWR 2013-2014Magnet Hospital RecognitionConsumer Choice2014 Best DoctorsJoint Commission Report

Disclaimer: The information on this website is for general informational purposes only and SHOULD NOT be relied upon as a substitute for sound professional medical advice, evaluation or care from your physician or other qualified health care provider.